dunnettreader + historicism   100

Kenneth R Westphal - 'Analytic Philosophy
The definitive version of this article appears in:
The Owl of Minerva , 42.1–2 (2010–11):1–18.
Rejection of the philosophical relevance of history of philosophy remains pronounced within contemporary Anglophone analytic philosophy. The two main reasons for this rejection presuppose that strict deduction isboth necessary and sufficient for rational justification. However, this justificatory ideal of scientia holds only within strictly formal domains. This is confirmed by a neglected non-sequitur in van Fraassen’s original defence of ‘Constructive Empiricism’. Conversely, strict deduction is insufficient for rationaljustification in non-formal, substantive domains of inquiry. In non-formal, substantive domains, rational justification is also, in part, ineliminably social and historical, for sound reasons Hegel was the first to articulate. -- Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
history_of_philosophy  historical_sociology  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  deduction  contextualism  evolution-social  development_process  Hegel  contingency  intellectual_history  logic  historicism  evolution-as-model  philosophy_of_social_science  van_Frassen  article  downloaded  analysis-logic  epistemology  epistemology-social  empiricism 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - 1750, Casualty of 1914: Lest We Forget the preKantian Enlightenment | Academia.edu
Draft of chapter for upcoming Crisis and Reconfigurations: 100 years since World War 1 collection. Argues that philosophical understanding (or increasingly, study and reading) of the French, British and preKantian German enlightenments, their intellectual origins and ends, has been a retrospective victim of the European horrors set in chain by 1914, despite a growing volume of excellent, countervailing studies (by Rasmussen, Lloyd, Israel, Wade, and others) in the history of ideas.
Research Interests: Critical Theory, Enlightenment, and Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  neo-Kantian  critical_theory  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  historians-and-politics  Early_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-sceptical  theodicy  progress  Löwith  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  Blumenberg  historiography-19thC  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Sylvie Taussig - Déclin et progrès chez Blumenberg (2011) - Cairn.info
La question du sens de l’histoire est un leitmotiv de la pensée moderne. La cosmologie issue de la révolution copernicienne a remis en cause la vision chrétienne qui posait de la Parousie au terme de l’histoire. Que des philosophies de l’histoire totalisantes aient pris le relais constitue une part de la sécularisation. Hans Blumenberg affirme la dimension indépassable de l’historicité tout en s’opposant aux tentatives de conférer un sens global à cette condition d’historicité de l’existence. Les Temps modernes, débarrassée des interminables discussions sur le progrès ou le déclin, sont légitimes. La sécularisation est ce processus dans lequel les ruines de l’âge ancien hantent la pensée moderne et l’aveuglent sur les enjeux de sa nouveauté – la mise à nu de sa contingence existentielle et du rôle humanisant de la culture
evolution-as-model  declinism  evolution-social  Blumenberg  progress  anti-modernity  secularization  secularism  modernity  historicism  Counter-Enlightenment  politico-theology  article  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
R. G. Collingwood - The Limits of Historical Knowledge (1928) | JSTOR - Journal of Philosophical Studies
The Limits of Historical Knowledge, R. G. Collingwood, Journal of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 3, No. 10 (Apr., 1928), pp. 213-222 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  Collingwood  British_Idealism  20thC  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
J DEN HOLLANDER, H PAUL & R PETERS - INTRO: THE METAPHOR OF HISTORICAL DISTANCE | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 1-10 -- What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontological, epistemological, moral, aesthetic, as well as methodological connotations. This implies that historical distance cannot be reduced to a single "problem" or "concept." At the same time, this wide variety of meanings associated with distance helps explain why an easily recognizable tradition of scholarly reflection on historical distance does not exist. In a broad survey of nineteenth-and twentieth-century historical theory, this article nonetheless attempts to show that distance has been a major, if seldom explicitly articulated, theme in European and American philosophy of history. In doing so, it pays special attention to those few authors who in recent years have taken up the metaphor for critical study. Finally, the paper summarizes some of the main arguments put forward in the articles comprising this issue on historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  postmodern  epistemic_virtue  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JAAP DEN HOLLANDER - CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND THE ART OF SELF-DISTANCING | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 51-67 -- According to founding fathers like Ranke and Humboldt, temporal distance is required to discern historical "ideas" or forms. The argument may have some plausibility, but the presupposition is plainly false, since we cannot see the past at all. This leaves us with the question of what to make of the so-called historical forms. This article discusses three different views. The first, historicist, view is objectivist and localizes historical forms in the past. The second, narrativist, view is subjectivist and localizes historical forms in the realm of imagination and representation. The third view goes beyond the other two in that it considers both sides. It does not use a one-sided but a two-sided concept of form, which hinges on the idea of a distinction. This means that historical forms occupy both sides of the subject-object distinction or the present-past distinction. Because the subject-object terminology is confusing, the essay employs an alternative distinction between first-and second-order observation. With the help of this distinction, it is possible to redescribe the distance metaphor in such a way that the theoretical status of contemporary history becomes less enigmatic. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
HERMAN PAUL - DISTANCE AND SELF-DISTANCIATION: INTELLECTUAL VIRTUE AND HISTORICAL METHOD AROUND 1900 | JSTOR History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 104-116 -- What did "historical distance" mean to historians in the Rankean tradition? Although historical distance is often equated with temporal distance, an analysis of Ernst Bernheim's Lehrbuch der historischen Methode reveals that for German historians around 1900 distance did not primarily refer to a passage of time that would enable scholars to study remote pasts from retrospective points of view. -- the metaphor rather conveys a need for self-distanciation. Self-distanciation is not a Romantic desire to "extinguish" oneself, but a virtuous attempt to put one's own ideas and intuitions about the working of the world between brackets in the study of people who might have understood the world in different terms. Although Bernheim did not explicitly talk about virtue, the article shows that his Lehrbuch nonetheless considers self-distanciation a matter of virtuous behavior, targeted at an aim that may not be fully realizable, but ought to be pursued with all possible vigor. For Bernheim, then, distance requires epistemological virtue, which in turn calls for intellectual character, or what Bernheim's generation considered scholarly selfhood {wissenschaftliche Persönlichkeit). Not a mapping of time onto space, but a strenuous effort to mold "scholarly characters," truly able to recognize the otherness of the past, appears to be characteristic of Bernheim's view of historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  historians  epistemology-history  virtue  epistemic_virtue  character  character-formation  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK BEVIR - WHY HISTORICAL DISTANCE IS NOT A PROBLEM | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 24-37 -- concerns about historical distance arose along with modernist historicism, and they disappear with postfoundationahsm. The developmental historicism of the 19thC appealed to narrative principles to establish continuity between past and present and to guide selections among facts. In the 20thC, modernist historicists rejected such principles, thereby raising the specter of historical distance: that is, the distorting effects of the present on accounts of the past, the chasm between facts and narrative. The modernist problem became: how can historians avoid anachronism and develop accurate representations of the past? Instead of using narrative principles to select facts, modernist historicists appealed to atomized facts to validate narratives. However, in the late 20thC, postmodernists (Frank Ankersmit and Hayden White) argued that there was no way to close the distance between facts and narratives. The postmodern problem became: how should historians conceive of their writing given the ineluctable distance between facts and narratives? Today, postfoundationahsm dispels both modernist and postmodernist concerns with historical distance; it implies that all concepts (not just historical ones) fuse fact and theory, and it dissolves issues of conceptual relativism, textual meaning, and re-enactment. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  Modernism  postmodern  post-foundational  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK SALBER PHILLIPS - RETHINKING HISTORICAL DISTANCE: FROM DOCTRINE TO HEURISTIC | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 11-23 -- I argue that distance needs to be reconceived in terms of the wider set of engagements that mediate our relations to the past, as well as the full spectrum of distance-positions from near to far. Re-imagined in these terms, distance sheds its prescriptiveness and becomes a valuable heuristic for examining the history of historical representation. When distance is studied in relation to the range of mediations entailed in historical representation, it becomes evident that the plasticities of distance/proximity are by no means limited to gradients of time; rather, temporality is bound up with other distances that come from our need to engage with the historical past as (simultaneously) a realm of making, oí feeling, of doing, and of understanding. Thus for every historical work, we need to consider at least four basic dimensions of representation as they relate to the problem of mediating distance: 1. the genres, media, and vocabularies that shape the history's formal structures of representation; 2. the affective claims made by the historical account, including the emotional experiences it promises or withholds; 3. the work's implications for action, whether of a political or moral nature; and 4. the modes of understanding on which the history's intelligibility depends. These overlapping, but distinctive, distances—formal, affective, ideological, and conceptual—provide an analytic framework for examining changing modes of historical representation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historicism  philosophy_of_history  historians  genre  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  reception  epistemology-history  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
CHINATSU KOBAYASHI and MATHIEU MARION - GADAMER AND COLLINGWOOD ON TEMPORAL DISTANCE AND UNDERSTANDING | JSTOR History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 81-103 -- we begin by suggesting an intuitive model of time embodying a notion of temporal distance that we claim is at work in Gadamer's hermeneutics, while it is rejected in Collingwood's theory of interpretation. To show this, after a brief review of the influence of Collingwood on Gadamer and of their disagreement over the possibility of recovering an author's intention, we examine in turn their answers to the problem of transposition, upon which the philosophy of Dilthey supposedly foundered. We show that Gadamer embraced the idea of temporal distance in his solution, which consisted in claiming that the distance between an author from the past and us is filled in by tradition, which opens access to the text for us, while Collingwood considered explanations of the actions of historical agents, and by extension understanding of a text, in intentional or rational terms. Furthermore, he thought that such explanations are not causal, and that the thoughts involved in them do not stand within the flow of physical time, which is involved in any notion of temporal distance. This is why Collingwood felt entitled to anti-relativistic conclusions about the recovery of authorial intentions, conclusions that prompted Gadamer to claim that "the dimension of hermeneutical mediation which is passed through in every act of understanding" escaped him. We then discuss the underlying notions of time at work in both Gadamer and Collingwood, showing that Ricoeur had a better appreciation of the issue, since he saw that Collingwood's moves parallel, up to a point, Heidegger's critique of "vulgar time," albeit with an entirely different result. We also point to the importance in Collingwood's thinking of his notion of "incapsulation." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  phenomenology  hermeneutics  20thC  Gadamer  Collingwood  Ricoeur  Heidegger  historicism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Alvin Gouldner: "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science" | Ralph Dumain: "The Autodidact Project"
Gouldner, Alvin W. "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science," in For Sociology: Renewal and Critique in Sociology Today (New York: Basic Books, 1973), Chapter 11, pp. 323-366. Bibliographical note, pp. 464-465. -- "Bibliographical Note (by A Gouldner) -- 'Romanticism and Classicism' is part of my ongoing, larger commitment to the study of the origins of Western social theory. This essay is the programmatic statement that has been guiding my joint work on Romanticism with Nedra Carp these last few years. Previouly unpublished." -- Dumain copied the text from the 1973 book of Gouldner's collected essays
social_theory  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  18thC  19thC  20thC  Romanticism  German_Idealism  Hegel  Hegelian-Left  elites  elite_culture  historicism  historical_sociology  Hellenophiles  Antiquarianism  classicism  Methodenstreit  Gouldner  class_conflict 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
G. A. Wells - Herder's Determinism | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (1958)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Jan., 1958), pp. 105-113 -- see also his follow up on how the German historicist school (Meinecke et al) found what they wanted to in Herder's works, distorting Herder in the process -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-18thC  German_scholars  historicism  relativism  causation  causation-social  Herder  determinism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
G. A. Wells - Herder's Two Philosophies of History (1960) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas - Vol. 21, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1960), pp. 527-537 - reviews reception of Herder's 2 stages of writing about history, how they have been characterized and debated since the late 18thC, and which he thinks says as much re German intellectual currents and historicism than Herder's own thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Herder  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  declinism  cycles  metaphor  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, trans. F.W. Maitland (CUP 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 10/2/2015. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> A translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  ebooks  political_history  political_culture  political_philosophy  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  German_scholars  German_historical_school  historicism  legal_history  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot - Jack Goody’s Historical Anthropology: The Need to Compare - Books & ideas - 4 February 2013
translated by John Zvesper - French version Nov 2012 -- A highly respected figure in African studies, Jack Goody has become a distinctive voice in the torrent of academic critiques of western ethnocentrism. His work, spanning more than sixty years, has been based on a single ambition: comparison, for the sake of more accurately locating European history within Eurasian and world history. -- serves as a useful intro to stages of debates within the post-WWII social sciences -- he retired in 1984, though a very active retirement -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  social_sciences-post-WWII  anthropology  Sub-Saharan_Africa  oral_culture  literacy  language-history  writing  alphabet  ancient_Greece  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  world_history  Eurocentrism  Eurasia  Eurasian_history  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  cultural_exchange  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  epistemology-history  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS CONCLUSION - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS PART TWO - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS PART ONE - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Panel discussion - Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing (Dec 2014) :: German Historical Institute London (GHIL)
Chair: Andreas Gestrich (German Historical Institute London) -- Discussants: David d’Avray, Peter Ghosh and Joachim Radkau -- Max Weber is one of the most prestigious social theorists in recent history. Many of his academic works are modern classics. Even 100 years after his death, his books are still read, edited, translated and interpreted. In recent years a number of biographies have shed new light on Weber’s life and work. In commemoration of Max Weber’s 150th anniversary, the German Historical Institute hosts a discussion with three Weber experts, British historians David d’Avray and Peter Ghosh and German historian Joachim Radkau, on Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing. **--** Peter Ghosh is Jean Duffield Fellow in Modern History at St Anne’ College, University of Oxford. His research interests focus primarily on the history of ideas, both social and political theory and also the history of historiography. His latest publication Max Weber and The Protestant Ethic: Twin Histories (Oxford University Press, 2014) offers an intellectual biography of Weber framed along historical lines. **--** David d’Avray, Professor of Medieval History at University College London, has worked on medieval marriage, on preaching, on attitudes to kingship and death, on rationalities, and on ‘longue durée’ structures of papal history. In Rationalities in History: a Weberian Analysis (Cambridge University Press 2010), he writes a new comparative history in the spirit of Max Weber. Reassessing seminal Weberian ideas, he applies value rationality to the comparative history of religion and the philosophy of law. **--** Joachim Radkau is Professor for Modern History at the University of Bielefeld. His latest research interests concentrate on environmental history, the history of nature conservation, and Max Weber’s self and social perception. In his extensive biography Max Weber: Die Leidenschaft des Denkens (Carl Hanser Verlag, 2005) (Max Weber: Passion for thinking), Radkau embeds Weber’s life and work in their historical context. -- MP3 download, 113 min, 64.2 MB -- downloaded to Note
audio  intellectual_history  Weber  social_theory  comparative_history  historiography-19thC  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  philosophy_of_law  sociology_of_religion  medieval_history  longue_durée  Papacy  biography  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  religious_history  rationality  environment  ecology-history  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Abdelmajid Hannoum, review essay - What is an Order of Time? - History & Theory, 2007 | Majid Hannoum - Academia.edu
Discussion of François Hartog, Regimes of Historicity (French, 2003), English translation 2015, Columbia University Press -- bookmarked and downloaded pdf to Note
reviews  books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  Koselleck  modernity  progress  teleology  presentism  historicism  anthropology  structuralist  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Carl Menger - Investigations into the Method of the Social Sciences - Books | Mises Institute
The famed Methodenstreit of the late 19th century was the battle of method. It pitted the emerging Austrian School against the German Historical School over a critically important question: what is the proper way to do social science? Here, Carl Menger, the founder of the School, vindicates the importance of theory, and lays the foundation for later developments by Mises and others. The book was written twelve years after his principles book, and it sought to deal with the hostility with which that book was greeted in the German world. Menger argues that economics can and must be more than an effort at observing, collecting, and assembling data. It can make general observations about the laws of economics that operate independently of time and place. -- No Austrian can overlook this very important treatise on method. This edition includes an introduction by Lawrence White that frames up the debate over method in light of modern trends in economic theory. -- This edition copyright NYU in 1960s and Mises Institute 2009 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  economic_theory  economic_sociology  social_theory  social_sciences  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  causation-social  covering_laws  Austrian_economics  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Marshall Brown, ed. - The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Romanticism, Vol. 5 (pbk 2007) | Cambridge University Press
This latest volume in the celebrated Cambridge History of Literary Criticism addresses literary criticism of the Romantic period, chiefly in Europe. Its seventeen chapters are by internationally respected academics and explore a range of key topics and themes. The book is designed to help readers locate essential information and to develop approaches and viewpoints for a deeper understanding of issues discussed by Romantic critics or that were fundamental to their works. Primary and secondary bibliographies provide a guide for further research. **--** Introduction *-* 1. Classical standards in the Romantic period - Paul H. Fry *-* 2. Innovation and modernity Alfredo De Paz *-* 3. The French Revolution - David Simpson *-* 4. Transcendental philosophy and romantic criticism - David Simpson *-* 5. Nature - Helmut J. Schneider *-* 6. Scientific models - Joel Black *-* 7. Religion and literature - E. S. Shaffer
8. Romantic language theory and the art of understanding - Kurt Mueller-Vollmer *-* 9. The Romantic transformation of rhetoric - David Wellbery *-* 10. Romantic irony - Gary Handwerk *-* 11. Theories of genre - Tilottama Rajan *-* 12. Theory of the novel - Marshall Brown *-* 13. The impact of Shakespeare - Jonathan Arac *-* 14. The vocation of criticism and the crisis of the republic of letters - Jon Klancher *-* 15. Women, gender, and literary criticism - Theresa M. Kelley *-* 16. Literary history and historicism - David Perkins *-* 17. Literature and the other arts - Herbert Lindenberger **--** downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  philosophy_of_language  Shakespeare-influence  classicism  modernity  German_Idealism  science-public  reason  irony  professionalization  authors-women  subjectivity  nature  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Rita Felski - "Context Stinks!" | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 42, No. 4 (AUTUMN 2011), pp. 573-591
This essay draws on the work of Bruno Latour to question conventional methods of "historicizing" and "contextualizing" works of art. Context is typically equated with original historical context, and the act of historicizing a text becomes a matter of linking it to other texts and events in the same slice of time. Such historicist approaches, I argue, cannot account for the transtemporal movement of texts, their ability to resonate across different periods, and the ways in which they speak to us now. Moreover, traditional models of context and its correlates (society, power, ideology, etc.) tend to downplay or actively deny the agency of artworks. What if we were to think of these artworks as nonhuman actors who modify states of affairs by making a difference? Such an approach calls on us to recognize the specificity of works of art as well as their sociability and wordliness. Artworks are not heroic actors engaged in endless opposition, subversion, and resistance; rather they are coactors and codependents, enmeshed in multiple attachments and associations that enable them to survive. -- Project MUSE
article  jstor  paywall  Project_MUSE  historiography  literary_history  literary_theory  art_history  historicism  contextualism  influence-literary  influence-art  Latour  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-17thC  historians  historiography-19thC  Mabillon  historicism  German_scholarship  Eliot_George  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Papacy  Restoration  Charles_II  US_Civil_War  biography-writing  Calvin  Franco-Prussian_war  Napoleon  British_history  French_Revolution  Spanish_Empire  Latin_America  imperialism  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  reviews  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Talleyrand  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabrielle M. Spiegel - Above, about and beyond the writing of history: a retrospective view of Hayden White's "Metahistory" | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Since its publication 40 years ago, Hayden White's Metahistory has been recognized as a foundational work for the literary analysis of historical writing. Long thought to be primarily concerned with questions of narrative, new interpretations have recently revised our understanding of White's principal aims as a theorist and philosopher of history. What has emerged from these works is a novel view of the status and meaning of tropes in Metahistory, the underlying existentialist engagements that guided White's thinking about them, and the ways in which both served his encompassing goal not only to critique the reigning Rankean paradigm of ‘history’ but to free contemporary historians and historiography altogether from the ‘burden of history’ for the sake of a morally responsible future. The article analyses the ways in which these new interpretations of White alter our understanding of the corpus of his work, from his early article on the ‘burden of history’ to his most recent writings on ‘the practical past’, with a principal focus on the re-readings of Metahistory itself. -- Gabrielle M. Spiegel is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of history at Johns Hopkins University and a past president of the American Historical Association. She has written extensively on historical writing in the Middle Ages in Latin and Old French and on the implications of contemporary critical theory for the practice of historiography.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  lit_crit  philosophy_of_history  constructivism  usable_past  historicism  historiography-19thC  Ranke  existentialism  White_Hayden 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David D. Roberts - Rethinking Hayden White's treatment of Croce | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Hayden White began as a partisan of the earlier Italian thinker Benedetto Croce. After 1963, however, White gradually turned against Croce, finally, in Metahistory, casting Croce's position as the limiting ironic outcome of nineteenth-century historiographical realism. Croce putatively left the historian as a passive observer, cut off from using historical understanding to help shape events. Whereas most students of White say little about White's encounter with Croce, this article argues that both thinkers were seeking to establish a post-realist cultural framework. Although White had plausible reasons to dissent from Croce, he sidestepped the challenge of the Crocean alternative by forcing Croce into a limiting mold as a time-bound, bourgeois ideological spokesman. This was to restrict unnecessarily and unfortunately the terms of post-realist debate. -- David D. Roberts is Albert Berry Saye Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of Georgia (U.S.A.). His most recent books are The Totalitarian Experiment in Twentieth-Century Europe: Understanding the Poverty of Great Politics (Routledge, 2006) and Historicism and Fascism in Modern Italy (Toronto, 2007). Among his earlier writings on Benedetto Croce are Benedetto Croce and the Uses of Historicism (California, 1987); Nothing but History: Reconstruction and Extremity after Metaphysics (California, 1995); and Una nuova interpretazione del pensiero di Croce: Lo storicismo crociano e il pensiero contemporaneo (Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, 1995).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  realism  narrative  philosophy_of_history  historicism  White_Hayden  Croce  postmodern  epistemology-history  historians-and-politics 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE DEATH OF GOD AND THE FALL OF MAN | Pandaemonium July 2014
Transcript of talk for Institute of Ideas -- The moral vision of modernity may have been, in other words, nourished by the crumbling of the God-ordained order. It was – it had to be – however, also rooted in faith, but a faith of a different kind – faith that humans were capable of acting rationally and morally without guidance from beyond. It was through the 19thC that religious faith truly began to crumble. But it was also in the 19thC that faith in the human capacity to act without God began also to erode. The optimism that had once suffused the humanist impulse began to ebb away and there began to develop a much darker view of what it meant to be human. By the late 19thC European societies came to experience both a crisis of faith and a ‘crisis of reason’, the beginnings of a set of trends that were to become highly significant in the 20thC – the erosion of Enlightenment optimism, a disenchantment with ideas of progress, a disbelief in concepts of truth, the growth of a much darker view of human nature. -- The death of God, in other words, went hand in hand with what we might call, if we were to continue to use religious symbolism, the Fall of Man. And the Fall of Man transformed the meaning of the Death of God. God is a metaphor for the desire for an authority beyond ourselves to frame our existence and guide our lives, the death of God for the insistence on acting without guidance from beyond. There are two aspects to the death of God. The decline of religious belief and the growth of a new faith in the capacity of humans to act without guidance from beyond. The first has always been overstated. The second has always been undervalued. - frames talk around Anscombe and MacIntyre
intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  morality-Christian  religious_belief  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  pagans  gods-antiquity  monotheism  teleology  human_nature  morality-conventional  morality-objective  progress  Enlightenment  Fin-de-Siècle  humanism  anti-humanism  Counter-Enlightenment  political_philosophy  reason  Anscombe  MacIntyre  tradition  identity  autonomy  individualism  community  communitarian  social_order  change-social  historical_change  historicism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David Carr - Place and Time: On the Interplay of Historical Points of View | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 153-167
A historian's account of a past action must take into account the agent's point of view, and that point of view may differ radically from that of the historian. This difference of points of view, I argue, may extend to the very place and time of the action in question. In this paper, by exploring the spatial and temporal aspects of action, agency, and the description of past action, I try to describe the interplay of points of view between historian and historical agent. Because of these differences, actions may be embedded in radically different realities for agent and historian, different conceptions of the spatially and temporally real. This is especially true of time: an action may have a very different future for the agent from the future it has in retrospect. These discrepancies, I claim, do not constitute an obstacle that can be overcome, but are structural features of the relation between description and action. This is because they are merely extensions into a particular domain of certain features of relations between persons. I try to show that these features also have implications for the concepts of narrative and of counterfactual history. -- Carr has been doing a lot on post postmodern historiography -- this piece looks useful for thinking about how to position a biographical narrative that gets at the protagonist's point of view -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  narrative  perspectivism  historicism  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law [1948], ed. Stephen Presser - Online Library of Liberty
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law, ed. Stephen Presser (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/671> Roscoe Pound, former dean of Harvard Law School, delivered a series of lectures at the University of Calcutta in 1948. In these lectures, he criticized virtually every modern mode of interpreting the law because he believed the administration of justice had lost its grounding and recourse to enduring ideals. Now published in the U.S. for the first time, Pound’s lectures are collected in Liberty Fund’s The Ideal Element in Law, Pound’s most important contribution to the relationship between law and liberty. The Ideal Element in Law was a radical book for its time and is just as meaningful today as when Pound’s lectures were first delivered. Pound’s view of the welfare state as a means of expanding government power over the individual speaks to the front-page issues of the new millennium as clearly as it did to America in the mid-twentieth century. Pound argues that the theme of justice grounded in enduring ideals is critical for America. He views American courts as relying on sociological theories, political ends, or other objectives, and in so doing, divorcing the practice of law from the rule of law and the rule of law from the enduring ideal of law itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  legal_theory  legal_system  legal_culture  legal_realism  US_legal_system  judiciary  sociology  social_history  social_sciences  liberty  liberalism  welfare_state  historicism  civil_liberties  civil_society  modernity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 5 (Historical & Financial Essays; The English Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
A UNIVERSAL MONEY. (1869.) Deals with international exchange, seignorage etc-- *-- HENRY CRABB ROBINSON.1 (1869.) *--* BAD LAWYERS OR GOOD? (1870.) *--* THE EARL OF CLARENDON. (1870.) *--* MR. GROTE. (1870?) *--* ON THE EMOTION OF CONVICTION. (1871.) *--* MR. LOWE AS CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER. (1871.) **--**--**--**-- THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION. (2nd edition)
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-17thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  political_philosophy  constitutionalism  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  public_finance  sovereign_debt  Clarendon_1st_Earl  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  UK_Government  Bagehot  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-17thC  historicism  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Papacy  Henry_VIII  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  German_Idealism  philosophy_of_history  US_Civil_War  Italy  diplomatic_history  Talleyrand  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleon_III  empires  French_Empire  Eliot_George  Franco-German_relations  Franco-Prussian_war  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Depkat - The 'Cultural Turn' in German and American Historiography | JSTOR: Amerikastudien / American Studies, Vol. 54, No. 3 (2009), pp. 425-450
This article analyzes the academic debates about the 'cultural turn' in U.S. and German historiography in terms of convergence and divergence. While the 'new cultural history' in the United States and Germany seem to be pretty much alike on the conceptual and theoretical level, the political, social, cultural and institutional contexts of historiography are significantly different in both countries. This explains the rather different dynamics of the cultural turn on both sides of the Atlantic. In Germany, the debate about the cultural turn stood in the long shadow of historicism, and it evolved as a largely academic discussion between post-historicist social historians revolving around the question of how to arrive at a deeper and more complex understanding of why people in the past acted the way they did. In the United States, the cultural turn, while it was moving on the academic plane, was still inseparably tied to the 'identity politics' and 'culture wars' of an American society that became increasingly self-aware of its diversity and multi-ethnicity. Against this backdrop the role of Germany-based experts on U.S. history in the debates about culture on both sides of the Atlantic is assessed critically. -- 200 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  19thC  20thC  Germany  US  cultural_history  historicism  social_history  historical_sociology  culture_wars  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Grumley - Theorizing Modernity: Unit of Study Guide 2014 - Sydney, Australia
Lecture notes on each class plus extensive reading lists, - see especially the post on alternative paper questions, each with a reading list -- PHIL 2633 Theorising Modernity -- The popular image of 19th century modernity was of a speeding locomotive clear of form, direction and ultimate destination. In reality, however, and despite unbounded optimism, the great thinkers of the 19th century were at least aware of deep contradictions and these tempered their assessments of modernity. This course will survey the best of these classical theories to discover to what extent they were able to capture the contradictions and problems we know only too well. The work of Hegel, de Tocqueville, Marx and Nietzsche will serve as paradigmatic attempts to discover the essence of modernity. Recurring themes and features will be examined through the prism of these thinkers: these include questions of meaning after the collapse of tradition, and problems arising from capitalism, industrialisation, the nation-state, democracy, bureaucratisation, individualism and the rise of secularism-- their main tendencies, antinomies and problems. The course will demonstrate how much we owe these thinkers for our understanding of modernity, as well as, considering their respective shortcomings from a contemporary perspective.
intellectual_history  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  Marx  Nietzsche  modernity  Industrial_Revolution  individualism  secularization  nation-state  nationalism  democracy  mass_culture  elite_culture  class_conflict  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  social_process  historicism  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Andrew Bowie - schelling, adorno and all that jazz » 3:AM Magazine - June 2014
Andrew Bowie is the ice cool jazz-playing philosopher whose musical riffs can be heard here and gigs checked out here. But when he’s not laying down mood and mellow he’s thinking all the time about how philosophy can fit in with other interests, about the importance of Schelling for the debate about freewill, about the importance of metaphor for Schelling and metaphysics, about Schellings’ links to Heidegger, Davidson and Wittgenstein, about the German philosophical tradition and Romanticism, about what’s wrong with the way analytic philosophers do philosophy of music, about why the East-West Divan Orchestra is an important example, about whether he is a strange pragmatist, about Adorno and how he helps us see what is wrong with some of the contemporary forms of philosophy, and how it might be fixed, about the role of historicism, about Adorno and his criticisms of analytics and Hegelians, about Adorno’s aesthetics, about whether Adorno is an Hegelian, and about Adorno’s writing style.
intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Germany  German_Idealism  Schelling  Romanticism  Heidegger  Adorno  analytical_philosophy  continental_philosophy  aesthetics  music  Hegelian  historicism  Wittgenstein  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (2012) eBook: Amazon.com
Biddick explores the 19thC foundations of medieval studies as an academic discipline as well as certain unexamined contemporary consequences of these origins. By pairing debates over current academic trends and issues with innovative readings of medieval texts, Biddick exposes the presuppositions of the field of medieval studies and significantly shifts the objects of its historical inquiry. Biddick describes how the discipline of medieval studies was defined by a process of isolation and exclusion—a process that not only ignored significant political and cultural issues of the 19thC but also removed the period from the forces of history itself. Wanting to separate themselves from popular studies of medieval culture, and valuing their own studies as scientific, 19thC academics created an exclusive discipline whose structure is consistently practiced today, despite the denials of most contemporary medieval scholars. Biddick supports her argument by discussing the unavowed melancholy that medieval Christians felt for Jews and by revealing the unintentional irony of nineteenth-century medievalists’ fabrication of sentimental objects of longing (such as the “gothic peasant”). The subsequent historical distortions of this century-old sentimentality, the relevance of worker dislocation during the industrial revolution, and other topics lead to a conclusion in which Biddick considers the impact of an array of factors on current medieval studies. Simultaneously displacing disciplinary stereotypes and altering an angle of historical inquiry, this book will appeal to readers who are interested in how historicizing processes can affect the development of academic disciplines
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  medieval_history  19thC  historicism  social_history  economic_culture  political_culture  intelligentsia  Industrial_Revolution  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  academia  disciplines  scientism  national_ID  folklore  nostalgia  sentimentalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
On Compromise (1874) -- The works of Lord Morley, Vol 3 - John Morley - Google Books
Concerned about erosion of acting according to moral and political principles. Analysis of causes (1) French example of claiming that policies deduced from general principles gives principle a bad name (2) historicism (1st rumbles of "relativism" accusation) (3) newspapers responding to short term opinions and prejudices of buyers (4) State Church puts important part of educated elite into defense of status quo and rejection of thinking through implications of new information, conditions etc - as well as encourage hypocrisy (5) nouveau riche that has neither the class tradition of noblesse oblige nor what he takes to be widely shared American attachment to the notion of the common good -- a political and intellectual_history of 19thC England, including reaction to Enlightenment - last chapter focus on free thought vs free speech, Locke, JS Mill, liberty and toleration, ending with remarks by Diderot -- added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  France  Anglo-French  Enlightenment  Hume  Diderot  Locke-religion  Mill  tolerance  free-thinkers  free_speech  public_opinion  newspapers  haute_bourgeoisie  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  historicism  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  liberalism  Victorian  Morley  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Corey W. Dyck, review - Avi Lifschitz, Language and Enlightenment: The Berlin Debates of the Eighteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
For its competition of 1771, the Berlin Academy of Sciences asked: "Supposing men abandoned to their natural faculties, are they in a position to invent language? And by what means will they arrive at this invention?" The winning essay was Herder's "On the Origin of Language." This was actually the Academy's 2nd on language. In 1759 they asked: "What is the reciprocal influence of the opinions of people on language, and of language on opinions?" The winner was the orientalist Johann David Michaelis. Lifschitz's lucid and engaging book is about the 1759 contest, as he considers the historical, philosophical, and political circumstances that led to its proposal and the broader scholarly views of Michaelis. -- While one might quibble with Lifschitz's attempt to find deep roots in the Leibnizian-Wolffian philosophy for the 1759 Academy question, there is no doubting that in Berlin of the 1750s a number of thinkers took an active interest in language, its role in framing social institutions, and its relation to the mind, primarily under the influence of the work of Condillac and Rousseau. These include the president of the Academy, Maupertuis, and Moses Mendelssohn There was also lively discussion among Academy members regarding the (synchronic) connection between language and opinions, esp French as the language of the Academy. -- Already in the 1750s ...mainstream Enlightenment figures recognized the "linguistic rootedness of all human forms of life" and the importance of language as a "tool of cognition". Lifschitz rightly contends [this counters the story that such a view ], with its focus on the historical and non-rational aspects of human nature, [came from counter-Enlightenment figures] such as Herder and Hamann. [This directly] challenge[s] the characterization ... in Isaiah Berlin's seminal studies [as well as more recent studies] such as Michael Forster's work on Herder's philosophy of language. ...Herder's claim, as characterized by Forster, that "thought is essentially dependent upon and bounded by language" and that "one cannot think unless one has a language and one can only think what one can express linguistically" must be taken in the broader context of these earlier philosophical (and political) debates.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  1750s  1760s  1770s  Enlightenment  Germany  French_Enlightenment  philosophy_of_language  human_nature  language-national  language  language-history  Biblical_criticism  perception  cognition  historicism  Hobbes  Locke  Condillac  Rousseau  Leibniz  Wolff  Mendelssohn  Herder  Hamann  academies  social_theory  Counter-Enlightenment  Berlin_Isaiah  Frederick_the_Great  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Ali Hasan, review - Albert Casullo, Essays on A Priori Knowledge and Justification // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The last thirty years or so have seen a significant resurgence of interest in the a priori. Albert Casullo's collection of excellent essays spans this period. The first six published essays (from 1977 to 2002) provide background to and central arguments for a number of themes covered in A Priori Justification (2003): (1) a defense of a minimal analysis of a priori justified belief as nonexperientially justified belief; (2) a critique of traditional criteriological arguments both for and against the existence of the a priori -- arguments that appeal to necessity, certainty, and empirical irrefutability or indefeasibility as criteria for a priori knowledge (or justification); (3) a critique of Laurence BonJour's (1998) argument that rationalism is preferable to empiricism since the rejection of the a priori leads to radical skepticism; (4) an assessment of the reliabilist approach to the a priori, including a defense of reliabilist responses to concerns with the coherence of the approach and its consistency with fallibilism and epistemological naturalism; and (5) a defense, on the basis of these critiques and the resulting stalemate between rationalism and empiricism, of the coherence of, and need for, empirical investigation into the existence of non-experiential sources of justification. The next four, published after A Priori Justification, explore some of the above issues in more detail. These include an extension of the critique of traditional arguments by considering Mill's, Quine's, Putnam's and Kitcher's arguments against the existence of the a priori ... and other topics such as the relationship between testimony and the a priori, and the relevance of socio-historical accounts of knowledge to the a priori.The final four pieces are unpublished essays that address some issues in the recent literature. The first is an extension of critiques of skeptical arguments for the a priori (like theme 3 above).... The second and third essays raise problems for some recent accounts of modal knowledge or knowledge of the modal status of propositions. The final piece defends the a priori/a posteriori distinction from recent attempts to challenge its cogency and significance, arguing that these attacks all miss their target, and ending by pointing to a different challenge raised by reflection on entitlement theories: that perhaps some warrant or justification is neither a priori nor a posteriori.
books  reviews  epistemology  apriori  rationalist  empiricism  evidence  historicism  fallibility  Putnam  Quine  Mill  scepticism  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nietzsche and Antiquity (Edited by Paul Bishop) 9781571132826 - Boydell & Brewer
This volume collects a wide-ranging set of essays examining Friedrich Nietzsche's engagement with antiquity in all its aspects. It investigates Nietzsche's reaction and response to the concept of "classicism," with particular reference to his work on Greek culture as a philologist in Basel and later as a philosopher of modernity, and to his reception of German classicism in all his texts. The book should be of interest to students of ancient history and classics, philosophy, comparative literature, and Germanistik. Taken together, these papers suggest that classicism is both a more significant, and a more contested, concept for Nietzsche than is often realized, and it demonstrates the need for a return to a close attention to the intellectual-historical context in terms of which Nietzsche saw himself operating. An awareness of the rich variety of academic backgrounds, methodologies, and techniques of reading evinced in these chapters is perhaps the only way for the contemporary scholar to come to grips with what classicism meant for Nietzsche, and hence what Nietzsche means for us today. The book is divided into five sections -- The Classical Greeks; Pre-Socratics and Pythagoreans, Cynics and Stoics; Nietzsche and the Platonic Tradition; Contestations; and German Classicism -- and constitutes the first major study of Nietzsche and the classical tradition in a quarter of a century.
books  find  intellectual_history  literary_history  cultural_critique  cultural_history  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  historicism  philology  pre-Socratics  Platonism  Plato  Stoicism  German_Idealism  German_lit  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall review - Erich Auerbach, Time, History and Literature » 3:AM Magazine
Erich Auerbach, Time, History, and Literature, Princeton University Press 2013 - blurb -- "Time, History, and Literature presents a wide selection of Auerbach’s essays, many of which are little known outside the German-speaking world. Of the 20 essays culled for this volume from the full length of his career, 12 have never appeared in English before, and one is being published for the first time. Foregrounded in this major new collection are Auerbach’s complex relationship to the Judaeo-Christian tradition, his philosophy of time and history, and his theory of human ethics and responsible action. Auerbach effectively charts out the difficult discovery, in the wake of Christianity, of the sensuous, the earthly, and the human and social worlds. A number of the essays reflect Auerbach’s responses to an increasingly hostile National Socialist environment. These writings offer a challenging model of intellectual engagement, one that remains as compelling today as it was in Auerbach’s own time.” -- James I. Porter is professor of classics and comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. His books include Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future and The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece. Jane O. Newman is professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. Her books include The Intervention of Philology and Benjamin’s Library.’ They’ve put together a terrific book.
books  reviews  amazon.com  intellectual_history  philology  historicism  historiography  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Hegel  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  bildung  Judaism  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Christianity  Early_Christian  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History [forum re Bevir's Logic] | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2, May, 2002
This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails. -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  philosophy_of_history  historiography  philosophy_of_social_science  historicism  intentionality  hermeneutics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Symposium: Assessing and Extending Bevir's "The Logic of the History of Ideas" | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 4, October 2012
(1) Revisiting the Middle Way: "The Logic of the History of Ideas" after More Than a Decade (pp. 583-592) Daniel I. O'Neill *--* (2) "The Logic of the History of Ideas": Mark Bevir and Michael Oakeshott (pp. 593-607) Martyn P. Thompson. *--* (3) A Moderate Logic of the History of Ideas (pp. 609-625) A. P. Martinich. *--* (4) "The Logic of the History of Ideas" and the Study of Comparative Political Theory (pp. 627-641) Sara R. Jordan and Cary J. Nederman. *--* (5) The Logic of the Historian and the Logic of the Citizen (pp. 643-655) Amit Ron. *--* (6) Post-Analytic Historicism (pp. 657-665) Mark Bevir -- update - no longer behind paywall - downloaded all to Note
books  journal  article  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  postanalytic_philosophy  post-foundational  historicism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy [eScholarship] (2009)
Original Citation:
Mark Bevir, “Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy”, Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (2009), 211-224

Keywords:
Historicism, Modernism, Postanalytic Philosophy, Quentin Skinner
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  historicism  Modernism  positivism  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  concepts  meaning  Skinner  Cambridge_School  contextualism  postanalytic_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Georg G. Iggers - Historicism: The History and Meaning of the Term | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 129-152
Supplements his discussion in his historiography book, I hope. Published before but same year as Ankersmit's article. Jstor information page has no abstract or bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  19thC  20thC  Germany  historicism  Ranke  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  Methodenstreit  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
HERMAN PAUL -- WHO SUFFERED FROM THE CRISIS OF HISTORICISM? A DUTCH EXAMPLE | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 49, No. 2 (May 2010), pp. 169-193
Was the crisis of historicism an exclusively German affair? Or was it a "narrowly academic crisis," as is sometimes assumed? Answering both questions in the negative, this paper argues that crises of historicism affected not merely intellectual elites, but even working-class people, not only in Germany, but also in the Netherlands. With an elaborated case study, the article shows that Dutch "neo-Calvinist" Protestants from the 1930s onward experienced their own crisis of historicism. For a variety of reasons, this religious subgroup came to experience a collapse of its "historicist" worldview. Following recent German scholarship, the paper argues that this historicism was not a matter of Rankean historical methods, but of "historical identifications," or modes of identity formation in which historical narratives played crucial roles. Based on this Dutch case study, then, the article develops two arguments. In a quantitative mode, it argues that more and different people suffered from the crisis of historicism than is usually assumed. In addition, it offers a qualitative argument: that the crisis was located especially among groups that derived their identity from "historical identifications." Those who suffered most from the crisis of historicism were those who understood themselves as embedded in narratives that connected past, present, and future in such a way as to offer identity in historical terms. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  historicism  religious_culture  religious_history  identity  Dutch  groups-identity  memory-group  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Wim Weymans - Michel de Certeau and the Limits of Historical Representation | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 43, No. 2 (May, 2004), pp. 161-178
The polymath Michel de Certeau is traditionally seen as one of a group of French post-structuralist thinkers who reject constructs in the social sciences in favor of the diversity of the everyday or the past. However, in this paper I will show that, as a historian, Certeau did not discard these constructs, but rather valued them as a means of doing justice to the "strangeness" of the past. The position that Certeau adopts can be seen most clearly from his theoretical debate with Paul Veyne, which is the starting point of this article. I then show how Certeau's first major historical work, The Possession at Loudun, exemplifies his theoretical position. An analysis of this work demonstrates how the historian's active reconstruction of interactions between exorcists, medical doctors, state officers, and possessed nuns helps us to perceive the complexity of the past in a way that can be seen as a microhistory avant la lettre. I will suggest that during his writing of the history of Loudun, Certeau implicitly raises more theoretical and epistemological problems, and in so doing he "practices" a theory of history. The most elusive aspect of the story at Loudun turns out to be the drama around the priest Grandier. This article demonstrates how Certeau pays tribute to Grandier by using "scientific" methods, thus showing the "limits of representation" through disciplinary means. Finally, the article explores the implications of Certeau's theory and practice of the writing of history for understanding historiography at large. The historian not only appears as a tramp who looks for remains that are forever lost to us, but is also a "scientist" who uses both models and concepts in order to put them to the test. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  20thC  historicism  new_historicism  poststructuralist  postmodern  microhistory  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
F. R. Ankersmit - Reply to Professor Iggers | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 168-173
Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory -- Professor Iggers's main target in his critique of my essay is my preference for the historicist over the Enlightenment conception of the past. I agree with Iggers that in contemporary historical theory and contemporary philosophy of language many effective arguments against historicism can be found. I argue, however, that these arguments lose much of their cogency if we recognize that the historicist notion of "the historical idea" can be redefined to satisfy both the requirements of actual historical practice and contemporary philosophy of language. The main task of the contemporary theoretician is not to reject historicism but to recognize and to discover its intellectual riches, and to repair it whenever and wherever necessary. -- see both Ankersmit's original article and Iggers response to article -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  historicism  style-history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Georg G. Iggers - Comments on F. R. Ankersmit's Paper, "Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis" | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 162-167
"Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- My differences with F. R. Ankersmit's essay are historiographical and theoretical. On the historiographical plane I disagree with the sharp distinction he draws between the "ontological realism" of Enlightenment historiography and the historical outlook of classical historicism. An examination of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire shows that Gibbon indeed takes into account internal changes in the Roman Empire. Ranke and Droysen on the other hand assume that the subjects of their study, whether the Papacy or the Prussian state, preserve their identity through time. And in their attempt to "raise history to the rank of a science" (Droysen), historicists in seeking to show wie es eigentlich gewesen (Ranke), go farther in the direction of realism than do Enlightenment historians who are keenly aware of the role of perspective and of the literary and aesthetic aspects of historical writing. On the theoretical plane, although I agree with Ankersmit that metaphor occupies a central role in historical discourse, I disagree when he writes that "coherence has its source either in reality or in the language we use for speaking about it. There is no third possibility." I argue that while reality can be approached only through the mediation of language and metaphor, these presuppose a reality which can be known, no matter how complex and mediated the process of cognitive approximation may be. Rejecting historical realism, Ankersmit nevertheless wants to "encounter the past with the same directness with which anthropologists encounter the alien culture," and thus to escape "all the ideological and emancipatory pretensions of its historiographical predecessor." Yet the very "new cultural history" he takes as an example shows that this cannot be done. -- see both Ankersmit's original article and Ankersmit's response essay downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Gibbon  Germany  historicism  historical_change  style-history  metaphor  Ranke  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
George Steinmetz - Charles Tilly, German Historicism, and the Critical Realist Philosophy of Science | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 312-336
This paper examines Charles Tilly's relationship to the schools of thought known as historicism and critical realism. Tilly was committed to a social epistemology that was inherently historicist, and he increasingly called himself a "historicist." The "search for grand laws in human affairs comparable to the laws of Newtonian mechanics," he argued, was a "waste of time" and had "utterly failed." Tilly's approach was strongly reminiscent of the arguments developed in the first half of the 20th century by Rickert, Weber, Troeltsch, and Meinecke for a synthesis of particularization and generalization and for a focus on "historical individuals" rather than abstract universals. Nonetheless, Tilly never openly engaged with this earlier wave of historicist sociology, despite its fruitfulness for and similarity to his own project. The paper explores some of the possible reasons for this missed encounter. The paper argues further that Tilly's program of "relational realism" resembled critical realism, but with main two differences: Tilly did not fully embrace critical realism's argument that social mechanisms are always co-constituted by social meaning or its normative program of explanatory critique. In order to continue developing Tilly's ideas it is crucial to connect them to the epistemological ideas that governed the first wave of historicist sociology in Weimar Germany and to a version of philosophical realism that is interpretivist and critical. -- 199 references! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  intellectual_history  20thC  Germany  historicism  Weber  positivism  covering_laws  scientism  critical_realism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
F. R. Ankersmit - Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 143-161
Lead article in "Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- According to German theorists historicism was the result of a dynamization of the static world-view of the Enlightenment. According to contemporary Anglo-Saxon theorists historicism resulted from a de-rhetoricization of Enlightenment historical writing. It is argued that, contrary to appearances, these two views do not exclude but support each other. This can be explained if the account of (historical) change implicit in Enlightenment historical writing is compared to that suggested by historicism and, more specifically, by the historicist notion of the "historical idea." Aspects of the contemporary debate about the nature and the task of historical writing can be clarified from the perspective of the differences between Enlightenment and historicist historical writing. -- see response article by Iggers and Ankersmit's response -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Germany  historicism  philosophy_of_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  belles-lettres  rhetoric-writing  historical_change  prose  style-history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
J. D. Braw - Vision as Revision: Ranke and the Beginning of Modern History | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2007), pp. 45-60
It is widely agreed that a new conception of history was developed in the early nineteenth century: the past came to be seen in a new light, as did the way of studying the past. This article discusses the nature of this collective revision, focusing on one of its first and most important manifestations: Ranke's 1824 Geschichten der romanischen und germanischen Völker. It argues that, in Ranke's case, the driving force of the revision was religious, and that, subsequently, an understanding of the nature of Ranke's religious attitude is vital to any interpretation of his historical revision. Being aesthetic-experiential rather than conceptual or "positive," this religious element is reflected throughout Ranke's enterprise, in source criticism and in historical representation no less than in the conception of cause and effect in the historical process. These three levels or aspects of the historical enterprise correspond to the experience of the past, and are connected by the essence of the experience: visual perception. The highly individual character of the enterprise, its foundation in sentiments and experiences of little persuasive force that only with difficulty can be brought into language at all, explains the paradoxical nature of the Rankean heritage. On the one hand, Ranke had a great and lasting impact; on the other hand, his approach was never re-utilized as a whole, only in its constituent parts-which, when not in the relationship Ranke had envisioned, took on a new and different character. This also suggests the difference between Ranke's revision and a new paradigm: whereas the latter is an exemplary solution providing binding regulations, the former is unrepeatable. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- useful re the 3 types of historiography Ranke opposed -- Bolingbroke wouldn't have had much to dispute
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  19thC  Germany  historicism  Ranke  revisionism  Lutherans  German_Idealism  Hegelian  Biblical_criticism  Bolingbroke  Study_and_Uses  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomasa H. Brobjer - Nietzsche's Relation to Historical Methods and Nineteenth-Century German Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 2 (May, 2007), pp. 155-179
Nietzsche is generally regarded as a severe critic of historical method and scholarship; this view has influenced much of contemporary discussions about the role and nature of historical scholarship. In this article I argue that this view is seriously mistaken (to a large degree because of the somewhat misleading nature of Vom Nutzen und Nachtheil der Historie für das Leben). I do so by examining what he actually says about understanding history and historical method, as well as his relation to the founders of modem German historiography (Wolf, Niebuhr, Ranke, and Mommsen). I show, contrary to most expectations, that Nietzsche knew these historians well and that he fundamentally affirmed their view of historical method. What he primarily objected to among his contemporaries was that historical scholarship was often regarded as a goal in itself, rather than as a means, and consequently that history was placed above philosophy. In fact, a historical approach was essential for Nietzsche's whole understanding of philosophy, and his own philosophical project.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  19thC  Nietzsche  historicism  Germany  Study_and_Uses  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC -- De la vérité: Pragmatisme, historicisme et relativisme | JSTOR: Rue Descartes, No. 5/6, Novembre 1992
Avant-propos (pp. 9-10) *-* PART 1 *-* A-t-on besoin du vrai ? Le défi pragmatique *-* *-- (1) Qu'est-ce que le pragmaticisme ? (pp. 13-21) Charles Sanders Peirce and Jacques Poulain. *-- (2) Le partage de l'héritage anticartésien de C.S. Peirce : D. Davidson, H. Putnam et R. Rorty (pp. 23-52) Jacques Poulain. *-- (3) Dewey entre Hegel et Darwin (pp. 53-71) Richard Rorty and Patrick Sauret. *-- (4) Wittgenstein, la vérité et le passé de la philosophie (pp. 73-93) Hilary Putnam and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 2 *-* Historicisme ou essentialisme ? L'alternative épistémologique. *-- (5) L'état de la théorie du langage chez Richard Rorty (pp. 97-109) Henri Meschonnic. *-- (6) Des tournants historiques (pp. 111-120) Jonathan Rée. *-- (7) La réalisation linguistique de la vérité (pp. 121-141) Aldo G. Gargani and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 3 Les fins de l'histoire pragmatique : la justice libérale et le Bien communautaire *-* *-- (8) Les limites du libéralisme. De l'éthique politique aux États-Unis aujourd'hui (pp. 145-157) Axel Honneth and Patrick Sauret. *-- (9) Les Lumières et l'esprit juif ou la raison des vaincus (pp. 159-175) Reyès Maté and Catherine Ballestero. *-- (9) Vérité, contingence et modernité (pp. 177-194) Albrecht Wellmer and Marie-Noëlle Ryan. *-* PART 4 *-* Le « bonheur » de l'homme pragmatique *-* *-- (10) L'esthétique pragmatique de Rorty (pp. 197-208) Rainer Rochlitz. *-- (11) L'esthetique postmoderne du rap (pp. 209-228) Richard Shusterman
journal  article  jstor  20thC  historiography  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  aesthetics  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  cultural_critique  modernity  contingency  continental_philosophy  pragmatism  historicism  relativism  postmodern  liberalism  critical_theory  Peirce  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
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