dunnettreader + historical_sociology   103

Harry Garretsen and Ron Martin - Rethinking (New) Economic Geography Models: Taking Geography and History More Seriously | Spatial Economic Analysis: Vol 5, No 2 (2010)
Harry Garretsen and Ron Martin -- Spatial Economic Analysis, Vol. 5 , Iss. 2, 2010 -- Two aspects of New Economic Geography models are often singled out for criticism, especially by geographers: the treatment of geography, typically as a pre-given, fixed and highly idealized abstract geometric space; and the treatment of history, typically as ‘logical’ time (the movement to equilibrium in a model's solution space) rather than real history. In this paper we examine the basis for these criticisms, and explore how far and in what ways NEG models might be made more credible with respect to their representation of geography and history, and particularly whether and to what extent the work of geographers themselves provides some insights in this regard. We argue that the conceptualization of space and time is in fact a challenge for both NEG theorists and economic geographers, and that, notwithstanding their ontological and epistemological differences, both groups would benefit from an interchange of ideas on this front. -- downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  economic_theory  economic_sociology  geography-and-economics  geography  economic_models  philosophy_of_social_science  historical_sociology  historiography 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Failed states and the paradox of civilisation - Ernesto Dal Bó, Pablo Hernandez-Lagos, Sebastián Mazzuca | Vox.EU - July 2016
While cases of state failure have risen in the last decade, most notably in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, they are not a new phenomenon. Historical evidence from the early modern period, and even the Bronze Age, shows that the majority of formed states have failed rather than thrived. This column introduces the ‘paradox of civilisation’ to characterise the obstacles settlements face in establishing civilisations. The paradox defines the success of a civilisation as a trade-off between the ability to produce economic surplus and to protect it. It is therefore important to correctly balance military and economic support when providing aid. - Summary of NBER paper- downloaded vox version to Tab S2
paper  downloaded  ancient_history  civilization-concept  state-building  institutional_capacity  institution-building  failed_states  military  economic_growth  historical_sociology  agriculture  ancient_Near_East  ancient_Egypt  Sub-Saharan_Africa  MENA  Iraq  Syria  ISIS 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - 'Analytic Philosophy
The definitive version of this article appears in:
The Owl of Minerva , 42.1–2 (2010–11):1–18.
Rejection of the philosophical relevance of history of philosophy remains pronounced within contemporary Anglophone analytic philosophy. The two main reasons for this rejection presuppose that strict deduction isboth necessary and sufficient for rational justification. However, this justificatory ideal of scientia holds only within strictly formal domains. This is confirmed by a neglected non-sequitur in van Fraassen’s original defence of ‘Constructive Empiricism’. Conversely, strict deduction is insufficient for rationaljustification in non-formal, substantive domains of inquiry. In non-formal, substantive domains, rational justification is also, in part, ineliminably social and historical, for sound reasons Hegel was the first to articulate. -- Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
history_of_philosophy  historical_sociology  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  deduction  contextualism  evolution-social  development_process  Hegel  contingency  intellectual_history  logic  historicism  evolution-as-model  philosophy_of_social_science  van_Frassen  article  downloaded  analysis-logic  epistemology  epistemology-social  empiricism 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Alvin Gouldner: "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science" | Ralph Dumain: "The Autodidact Project"
Gouldner, Alvin W. "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science," in For Sociology: Renewal and Critique in Sociology Today (New York: Basic Books, 1973), Chapter 11, pp. 323-366. Bibliographical note, pp. 464-465. -- "Bibliographical Note (by A Gouldner) -- 'Romanticism and Classicism' is part of my ongoing, larger commitment to the study of the origins of Western social theory. This essay is the programmatic statement that has been guiding my joint work on Romanticism with Nedra Carp these last few years. Previouly unpublished." -- Dumain copied the text from the 1973 book of Gouldner's collected essays
social_theory  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  18thC  19thC  20thC  Romanticism  German_Idealism  Hegel  Hegelian-Left  elites  elite_culture  historicism  historical_sociology  Hellenophiles  Antiquarianism  classicism  Methodenstreit  Gouldner  class_conflict 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Gianfranco Poggi , review - Lawrence Scaff, Weber and the Weberians - Books & ideas - Nov 2015
Reviewed: Lawrence Scaff, Weber and the Weberians, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 199 p. -- Proving his mastery of Weber’s oeuvre, Scaff’s new book considers the imprint left by various aspects of Weber’s work on the imagination and production of three generations of authors from Europe and North America. He shows that the confrontation between contemporary scholars and Weber’s legacy is a show that will run and run… -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  intellectual_history  20thC  Weber  historical_sociology  social_theory  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Pier Giovanni Guzzo - Pompéi italique et sa structuration urbaine - Techniques et économies de la Méditerranée antique - Collège de France - 24 novembre 2014
Pier Giovanni Guzzo -- Professeur, ancien surintendant de l'archéologie de l'Emilie-Romagne de la Calabre, de Pompéi et de Naples, Membre du conseil de direction de l'Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell'Arte -- 24 novembre 2014 16:00 -- Conférencier invité -- Salle 2 - Marcelin Berthelot
video  lecture  Collège_deFrance  archaeology  ancient_Rome  Pompeii  economic_history  urbanization  Mediterranean  ancient_history  antiquity  antiquity-economics  historical_sociology 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Hoffman, P.T.: Why Did Europe Conquer the World? (eBook and Hardcover).
Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84% of the globe. But why did Europe rise to the top, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? Why didn’t these powers establish global dominance? ...distinguished economic historian Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations— eg geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if variables had been at all different, Europe would not have achieved critical military innovations, and another power could have become master of the world. In vivid detail, he sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development and military rivalry. Compared to their counterparts in China, Japan, South Asia, and the Middle East, European leaders—whether chiefs, lords, kings, emperors, or prime ministers—had radically different incentives, which drove them to make war. These incentives, which Hoffman explores using an economic model of political costs and financial resources, resulted in astonishingly rapid growth in Europe’s military sector from the Middle Ages on, and produced an insurmountable lead in gunpowder technology. The consequences determined which states established colonial empires or ran the slave trade, and even which economies were the first to industrialize. -- Professor of Business Economics and professor of history at CalTech. His books include Growth in a Traditional Society (PUP), Surviving Large Losses, and Priceless Markets. -- ebook and pbk not yet released --text 200 pgs, data, mideks in appendices ~35 pgs -- downloaded 1st chapter excerpt
books  kindle-available  Great_Divergence  economic_history  political_history  political_culture  military_history  technology  gunpowder  colonialism  imperialism  Europe  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  incentives  wars-causes  war  Innovation  technology-adoption  historical_sociology  historical_change  balance_of_power  path-dependency  Tilly  Mann_Michael  state-building  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Emergentism and generationism | Understanding Society 3014
So Epstein and Page both make use of the methods of agent based modeling, but they disagree about the idea of emergence. Page believes that complex adaptive systems give rise to properties that are emergent and irreducible; whereas Epstein doesn't think the idea makes a lot of sense. Rather, Epstein's view depends on the idea that we can reproduce (generate) the macro phenomena based on a model involving the agents and their interactions. Macro phenomena are generated by the interactions of the units; whereas for Page and Miller, macro phenomena in some systems have properties that cannot be easily derived from the activities of the units. At the moment, anyway, I find myself attracted to Herbert Simon's effort to split the difference by referring to "weak emergence" (link to amazon kindle): - Epstein paper dowmloaded to iPhone
social_theory  emergence  complex_adaptive_systems  complexity  agent-based_models  methodology  methodological_individualism  causation-social  anthropology  historical_sociology  fownloaded  kindle-available 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
George Steinmetz - William Sewell's "Logics of History" as a Framework for an Integrated Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter, 2008), pp. 535-553
This essay surveys the contributions of William H. Sewell Jr.'s "Logics of History" and concludes that the book sketches a compelling agenda for an integrated historical social science. The author first summarizes Sewell's ontological and epistemological claims concerning social structure and event, history and temporality, and sociohistorical causality. The author then discusses five main areas in which ambiguities in Sewell's approach might be clarified or his arguments pushed farther. These concern (1) the relationship between historical event and traumatic event; (2) the idea of the unprecedented event or "antistructure"; (3) the theory of semiosis underlying Sewell's notion of a multiplicity of structures; and (4) the compatibilities and differences between the concepts of structure and mechanism (here the author argues that social structures are the distinctive "mechanisms" of the human or social sciences). Finally, (5) Sewell's call for "a more robust sense of the social" in historical writing locates the "social" mainly at the level of the metafield of power, or what regulation theory calls the mode of regulation; the author suggests a possible integration of this society-level concept with Pierre Bourdieu 's theory of semiautonomous fields. -- This is a Duke journal that only uses jstor for posting abstracts for the entire history of the journal
article  find  libraries  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  structure  event  causation-social  power  levels_of_analyis  Bourdieu  fields  ontology-social  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Tilly - Contentious Choices [overview of Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change] | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4 (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 473-481
Articles in this special issue address two choices faced by all analysts of contentious politics: 1) which features of political processes the analysts single out for description and explanation and 2) what sorts of conceptualizations and explanations of those processes they propose. On the first point, the articles split among a) variation and change in actors' strategies as well as consequences of those strategies, b) longer-term transformations of political context and consequences, c) grounding of contention in local circumstances. On the second, they choose among a) very general explanatory frameworks, b) particular causal mechanisms that produce similar effects across a wide variety of political circumstances, and c) explanation by means of careful attachment of episodes to local and regional settings. The articles therefore illustrate broad challenges in current studies of political contention. -- a late methodological essay on approaches to contentious politics and mechanisms, explanation, causation, generalizations etc in Tilly's career -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  causation-social  Tilly  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Black, review - Philip E. Tetlock; Richard Ned Lebow; Geoffrey Parker, eds. , Unmaking the West: 'What-If?' Scenarios That Rewrite World History | JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 587-588
Black gives it high marks for (1) the introductory chapters that set up the issues and debates re use of counterfactuals and (2) the diversity of issue areas tackled, such as what if Europe hadn't adopted Christianity. Goldstone has a chapter framing William_III victory in the Glorious Revolution as critical turning point for industrial revolution, European political economy and Great Divergence. Carla Pestana has a brief contrary comment piece. Includes usual suspects like Victor Hanson and Joel Mokyr.
books  reviews  jstor  historiography  historical_sociology  historical_change  counterfactuals  contingency  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  Industrial_Revolution  British_history  Western_civ  religious_culture  Christendom 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Lapavitsas, Costas - Money as a 'Universal equivalent' and its origin in commodity exchange (2003) - SOAS Research Online (School of Oriental and African Studies)
Lapavitsas, Costas (2003) Money as a 'Universal equivalent' and its origin in commodity exchange. London, UK: School of Oriental and African Studies. -- no abstract -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  anthropology  money  value-theories  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ECONOMICS AS SOCIAL THEORY - Routledge Series edited by Tony Lawson - Titles List
Social theory is experiencing something of a revival within economics. Critical analyses of the particular nature of the subject matter of social studies and of the types of method, categories and modes of explanation that can legitimately be endorsed for the scientific study of social objects, are re-emerging. Economists are again addressing such issues as the relationship between agency and structure, between the economy and the rest of society, and between inquirer and the object of inquiry. There is renewed interest in elaborating basic categories such as causation, competition, culture, discrimination,evolution, money, need, order, organisation, power, probability, process, rationality, technology, time, truth, uncertainty and value, etc. The objective for this series is to facilitate this revival further. In contemporary economics the label `theory' has been appropriated by a group that confines itself to largely a-social, a-historical, mathematical `modelling'. Economics as Social Theory thus reclaims the `theory' label, offering a platform for alternative, rigorous, but broader and more critical conceptions of theorising.
books  social_theory  economic_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  political_economy  causation-social  economic_sociology  economic_culture  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rationality-bounded  rational_expectations  critical_realism  evolution-social  history_of_science  historical_sociology  agency-structure  power  power-asymmetric  business-and-politics  capitalism  capital_as_power  Marxist  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  epistemology-social  conventions  social_order  civil_society  public_policy  public_goods  anarchism  competition  financialization  development  economic_growth 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Koppelman - Naked Strong Evaluation - Dissent, p. 105, Winter 2009 :: SSRN
Andrew Koppelman -Northwestern University School of Law -- Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 14-49 -- A review, for Dissent magazine, of Charles Taylor’s book, A Secular Age. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 6 - Keywords: Charles Taylor, Religion, Secularism -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  Taylor_Charles  historical_sociology  sociology_of_religion  cultural_history  intellectual_history  secularism  secularization  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Protestants  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Goldstone - What is ISIS? | NewPopulationBomb - August 13, 2014
The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has emerged as the most terrifying and brutal of extreme jihadist groups (and that is against tough competition, such as Boko Haram in Nigeria and Al-Shabaab in Somalia). Why have such extreme Islamist groups emerged in so many places in recent years? Odd as this may sound, it is not because of the appeal of extreme Islam itself. A study of fighters in Syria by Mironova, Mrie, and Whitt found that most fighters join ISIS and similar groups because (1) they want vengeance against the Assad regime and (2) they found from experience that the Islamist groups take the best care of their fighters — caring for the wounded, supporting them in battle. In situations of social breakdown — which are generally NOT caused by the Islamist groups themselves, but by problems of finances, elite divisions, and popular unrest due to oppressive or arbitrary actions by the state – extremists tend to have major advantages. This has always been the case throughout the history of revolutions: moderates are usually outflanked and outmaneuvered and out-recruited by radicals; so much so that the triumph of radicals over moderates is a staple of academic work on the trajectory of revolutions, from Crane Brinton to my own.
historical_sociology  revolutions  radicals  Iraq  Syria  MENA  Islamist_fundamentalists  US_foreign_policy  global_governance  NATO  military  military_history  alliances  Thirty_Years_War  terrorism  GWOT 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Suzanne J. Konzelmann - The political economics of austerity | Cambridge Journal of Economics 2013
Birkbeck, University of London. -- The 2007/08 financial crisis has reignited the debate about economic austerity. With the aim of understanding why a government would pursue such a policy in the current context of persistent economic recession, this article traces the social, political and economic developments that have together shaped the evolution of ideas about austerity, from the earliest theorising by the classical political economists some 300 years ago. Throughout the historical narrative, important analytical themes revolve around the arguments used to justify austerity—notably appeals to ethics and morality (reinforced by misleading analogies drawn between government budgets and the accounts of firms and households). These include concerns about inflation and the observed relationship between inflation and unemployment; ‘Ricardian equivalence’ and ‘non-Keynesian’ effects of austerity; and the correlation between public debt levels and economic growth. The class analytics of austerity—who bears the burden of austerity and who benefits—and the process by which alternative ideas penetrate the mainstream and reconstitute the conventional wisdom are also important analytical themes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  economic_theory  economic_sociology  economic_policy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Great_Recession  austerity  business_cycles  business-and-politics  ideology  macroeconomics  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  inflation  unemployment  moral_economy  historical_sociology  class_conflict  public_opinion  public_finance  sovereign_debt  economic_growth  debt  debtors  creditors  intermediation  Labor_markets  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jon Elster - One Social Science or Many? - 2009 | Scribd
Discusses his version of methodological individualism and aggregated units of analysis as "second best" -- example of household as unit distorts behavior because doesn't capture social dynamics within hiusehold -- ends with appeal to the various social sciences reading classics of history -- jn other wirds, "history is philosophy teaching by example"
paper  Scribd  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  behavioral_economics  methodology-quantitative  methodology  individualism-methodology  Bolingbroke  historical_sociology  history-as_experiment  history-and-social_sciences 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Isaiah Berlin's Neglect of Enlightenment Constitutionalism (2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-12 -- One of the most important achievements of the Enlightenment is what I shall call Enlightenment constitutionalism. It transformed our political thinking out of all recognition; it left, as its legacy, not just the repudiation of monarchy and nobility in France in the 1790s but the unprecedented achievement of the framing, ratification, and establishment of the Constitution of the United States. It comprised the work of Diderot, Kant, Locke, Madison, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Sieyes, and Voltaire. It established the idea of a constitution as an intricate mechanism designed to house the untidiness and pluralism of human politics. Yet Isaiah Berlin, supposedly one of our greatest interpreters of the Enlightenment, said almost nothing about it. The paper develops this claim and it speculates as to why this might be so. Certainly one result of Berlin's sidelining of Enlightenment constitutionalism is to lend spurious credibility to his well-known claim that Enlightenment social design was perfectionist, monastic, and potentially totalitarian. By ignoring Enlightenment constitutionalism, Berlin implicitly directed us away from precisely the body of work that might have refuted this view of Enlightenment social design. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  French_Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  Enlightenment_Project  Berlin_Isaiah  rationalist  perfectibility  progress  Montesquieu  Founders  Madison  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  Glorious_Revolution  constitutionalism  government-forms  Sieyes  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  Absolutism  institutions  institutional_change  representative_institutions  tyranny  limited_monarchy  limited_government  rule_of_law  Diderot  Voltaire  Locke-2_Treatises  Kant  historical_sociology  social_sciences  social_process  pluralism  conflict  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Marx, Law, Ideology, Legal Positivism (2014) :: SSRN
This essay -- for the UVA conference on "Jurisprudence and History" -- offers an account of Marx’s theory of history and his claim that law (and morality) are "ideological," and then asks what theory of law is adequate to explain the way the Marxist theory understands law in both its ideological and non-ideological senses. In Marx's theory we need to be able to say what law is in three contexts: (1) there are the laws that constitute the relations of production, i.e., the scheme of property rights in the existing forces of production; (2) there are the laws (and associated legal beliefs, e.g., "you are entitled to equal protection of the law") that are superstructural and ideological in the pejorative sense; and (3) there are the laws that are non-ideological and superstructural because they characterize the legal relations of a non-class-based, i.e., a communist, society. I explain these different senses of law in Marx's theory and then argue that legal positivism, unlike other views about the nature of law, gives us a sensible explanation of law for purposes of the Marxist theory of historical change. That fact, in turn, gives us another data point in favor of positivism as the only serious explanation of the concept of law. -- Keywords: Iegal positivism, Marx, Hart, Dworkin Finnis, ideology -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  historiography-19thC  historiography-Marxist  historical_change  legal_history  legal_system  ideology  property  property_rights  positivism-legal  Marx  Hart  Dworkin  Finnis  natural_law  natural_rights  rights-legal  legal_culture  legal_realism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited (May 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Aurelian Craiutu argues that Tocqueville was not just an observer of democracy in America but also a theorist of democracy who wanted to create “a new science of politics” suitable to the new world which was beginning to take shape at that time. Craiutu points out four dimensions of Tocqueville’s new science of politics that might help us better understand his thinking. The first is that Tocqueville’s new science of politics is fundamentally cross-disciplinary, at the intersection of political science, sociology, anthropology, history, and philosophy. He then goes on to discuss the other dimensions such as its comparative, normative, and political dimensions. He concludes that his works must therefore be seen as belonging to a larger French tradition of political engagement and political rhetoric in which the writer enters into a subtle and complex pedagogical relationship with his audience, seeking to convince and inspire his readers to political action. This thesis is discussed by Daniel J. Mahoney of Assumption College, Filippo Sabetti of McGill University, and Jeremy R. Jennings of King’s College London. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_culture  liberalism  republicanism  human_nature  political_science  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  audience  comparative_history  historical_sociology  US_society  US_politics  social_order  historical_change  Tocqueville  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Bert De Munck - Conventions, the Great Transformation and Actor Network Theory | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 4 (142) (2012), pp. 44-54
This article proceeds from the field of tension between the synchronical approach of the economics of convention and the diachronical approach of economic anthropology (in the tradition of Karl Polanyi). It is argued that the economics of convention remain problematic to historians in that they fail to capture the long term transformations traditionally referred to as the emergence of modernity and the coming about of homo economicus. As a possible solution, the use of concepts and insights from Actor Network Theory is proposed. While this cluster of theories enables an historical perspective without considering modernity as a natural process, it confronts changing relationships between subjects, objects and cultural systems of meaning head on. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_sociology  economic_culture  markets  conventions  regulation  structure  microfoundations  historical_sociology  modernity  capitalism  synchronic  dyachronic  anthropology  Polanyi_Karl  Actor_Network_Theory  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Faustine Perrin - Unified Growth Theory: An Insight | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 3 (137) (2011), pp. 362-372
The Unified Growth Theory is receiving increasing attention from growth theorists since the seminal work of Galor and Weil (1999, 2000). These authors emphasize the need for a unified theory of growth that could account for the transition from Malthusian Stagnation to the Modern Growth Regime (1999). This interest is motivated by the lack of explanation and knowledge regarding the historical evolution of the relationship among population growth, technological change and the standard of living. This paper gives an overview of the Unified Growth Theory, its determinants and its implications. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_growth  historical_sociology  demography  Malthusian  Malthus  technology  Great_Divergence 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Depkat - The 'Cultural Turn' in German and American Historiography | JSTOR: Amerikastudien / American Studies, Vol. 54, No. 3 (2009), pp. 425-450
This article analyzes the academic debates about the 'cultural turn' in U.S. and German historiography in terms of convergence and divergence. While the 'new cultural history' in the United States and Germany seem to be pretty much alike on the conceptual and theoretical level, the political, social, cultural and institutional contexts of historiography are significantly different in both countries. This explains the rather different dynamics of the cultural turn on both sides of the Atlantic. In Germany, the debate about the cultural turn stood in the long shadow of historicism, and it evolved as a largely academic discussion between post-historicist social historians revolving around the question of how to arrive at a deeper and more complex understanding of why people in the past acted the way they did. In the United States, the cultural turn, while it was moving on the academic plane, was still inseparably tied to the 'identity politics' and 'culture wars' of an American society that became increasingly self-aware of its diversity and multi-ethnicity. Against this backdrop the role of Germany-based experts on U.S. history in the debates about culture on both sides of the Atlantic is assessed critically. -- 200 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  19thC  20thC  Germany  US  cultural_history  historicism  social_history  historical_sociology  culture_wars  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Religion and the Rise of Liberal-Democratic Ideology in 17th-Century England | JSTOR: American Sociological Review, Vol. 54, No. 2 (Apr., 1989), pp. 163-179
In classical and contemporary sociology, key elements of liberal-democratic ideology are seen as secular extensions of Protestant ideas. This case study provides a different analysis that emphasizes the problem of religious conflict and radicalism in early liberal-democratic ideology. Proponents of the new ideology rejected key tenets of their Puritan heritage, adopting deistic beliefs that legitimated pluralism and tolerance and opposed the older Puritan ideal of godly politics. Building on recent work in the sociology of culture, the paper outlines an analytic strategy for explaining change in ideological systems. Ideological change emerges out of the interaction of contextual pressures and intellectual precedents, as a collective response by ideological innovators to problems of authority. The analysis in this study shows how historical events can form an episodic context which structures this problem of authority. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historical_sociology  historical_change  change-intellectual  political_philosophy  ideology  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  godly_persons  Deism  theocracy  Calvinist  pluralism  tolerance  Socinians  liberalism  democracy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Milan Zafirovski - The Merton Theorem Revisited and Restated: Conservatism and Fascism as Functional Analogues | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 2 (June 2010), pp. 142-173
The paper revisits and restates the Merton Theorem of American religious conservatism (Puritanism) and European fascism (Nazism) as functional analogues. The original formulation the Merton Theorem identifies and describes them as functional analogues in nativism or nationalism through exclusion of and aggression against non-native out-groups. The paper offers an extended restatement of the Merton Theorem in which American conservatism and European fascism function as functional analogues in that both represent the model of a closed, or the antithesis to an open, society, of which nativism is a special case. In the extended Merton Theorem they are functional analogues specifically in terms of such indicators or dimensions of a closed society as political absolutism, closure and oppression, religious absolutism and nihilism, moral absolutism and repression, and extremism. -- important bibliography of work since Walzer in 1960s on 17thC, Weber's thesis etc plus recent articles on nationalism, ethnic identity, right wing extremism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  political_culture  Puritans  Protestant_Ethic  conservatism  right-wing  fascism  nationalism  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  modernization  secularization  fundamentalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Every Great Revolution is a Civil War | David Armitage - 2014
Frim "Scripting Revolutions" conference - Citation: Armitage, David. In Press. “Every Great Revolution is a Civil War”. In Scripting Revolution, eds.Keith Michael Baker and Edelstein, Dan. Stanford: Stanford University Press. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_history  revolutions  historical_sociology  American_Revolution  French_Revolution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Lincoln Mullen · Mapping the Spread of American Slavery - May 2014
As I see it, one of the main problems for the historians’ method today is the problem of scale. How can we understand the past at different chronological and geographical scales? How can we move intelligibly between looking at individuals and looking at the Atlantic World, between studying a moment and studying several centuries? Maps can help, especially interactive web maps that make it possible to zoom in and out, to represent more than one subject of interest, and to set representations of the past in motion in order to show change over time. I have created an interactive map of the spread of slavery in the United States from 1790 to 1860. Using Census data available from the NHGIS, the visualization shows the population of slaves, of free African Americans, of all free people, and of the entire United States. It also shows those subjects as population densities and percentages of the population. For any given variable, the scales are held constant from year to year so that the user can see change over time.
historiography  digital_humanities  US_history  slavery  18thC  19thC  maps  change-social  historical_sociology  spatial  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kim Voss - Enduring Legacy? Charles Tilly and "Durable Inequality" | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 368-374
This article assesses Charles Tilly's Durable Inequality and traces its influence. In writing Durable Inequality, Tilly sought to shift the research agenda of stratification scholars. But the book's initial impact was disappointing. In recent years, however, its influence has grown, suggesting a more enduring legacy. -- interesting shift in stratification research -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  economic_sociology  inequality  gender  race  stratification  Tilly  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Rogers Brubaker - Charles Tilly as a Theorist of Nationalism | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 375-381
This paper considers Charles Tilly as an important but underappreciated theorist of nationalism. Tilly's theory of nationalism emerged from the "bellicist" strand of his earlier work on state-formation and later incorporated a concern with performance, stories, and cultural modeling. Yet despite the turn to culture in Tilly's later work, his theory of nationalism remained state-centered, materialist, and instrumentalist— a source of both its power and its limitations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  nation-state  nationalism  conflict  Tilly  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 358-367
"From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action as Reflected in His Analyses of Contentious Politics" in special issue - Remembering Charles Tilly -- Charles Tilly's social theories shifted over the course of his career from an early focus on quantitative and macro-sociological approaches to a later focus on relations and agency. His studies of state-making also shifted, from a focus on conflict and capitalism to explorations of democracy. This paper details these shifts and places them in the context of broader trends in comparative-historical and political sociology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  conflict  structure  agency  agency-structure  social_process  relations-social  causation-social  democracy  nation-state  nationalism  economic_sociology  power  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Mustafa Emirbayer - Tilly and Bourdieu | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 400-422
The first part of this essay discusses the most important similarities between the sociological visions of Pierre Bourdieu and Charles Tilly; the second part surveys the key differences. The conclusion then offers a critical assessment of these two thinkers' respective contributions to social science. -- huge references list -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  cultural_capital  Tilly  Bourdieu  change-social  power  power-symbolic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Gerhard Lenski - Societal Taxonomies: Mapping the Social Universe | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 20 (1994), pp. 1-26
Taxonomies have played a much more important role in the development of the sciences than is generally recognized by sociologists. They have provided both a foundation for the formulation of basic theory and a spur to innovative research. This paper traces the development from ancient times to the present of efforts to create a taxonomy of human societies, the most basic and inclusive of all social systems. It concludes with a discussion of the question of whether there are compelling reasons for preferring any one of the various taxonomies that have been devised. Four principles for evaluating taxonomies are proposed and applied. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  historical_sociology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Craig Calhoun - Gerhard Lenski, Some False Oppositions, and "The Religious Factor" | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 194-204
Special issue - Religion, Stratification, and Evolution in Human Societies: Essays in Honor of Gerhard E. Lenski -- very useful intellectual_history of 20thC historical sociology -- from earlier stadial to evolution-social to modernization, rejected by 60s generation, and reformulated as historical sociology
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  social_theory  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  modernization  progress  historical_sociology  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan H. Turner - Toward a General Sociological Theory of the Economy | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 229-246
Vol. 22, No. 2, Religion, Stratification, and Evolution in Human Societies: Essays in Honor of Gerhard E. Lenski -- In the spirit of Gerhard Lenski's macro-level analysis of stratification and societal evolution, a theory of the economy is presented. Like Lenski's work, this theory emphasizes population and power as they interact with production and distribution dynamics. Macro-level social organization in general, and economic processes in particular, are viewed as driven by the forces of population, power, production, and distribution. For each force, a theoretical proposition is presented. Forces are all implicated in each other; the resulting set of principles provides a view of how production and distribution, as the core of an economy, are embedded in population and power processes, and vice versa. The end result is a more general macro-level theory that captures the spirit and substance of Lenski's models of societal organization.
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  economic_sociology  population  power  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Wulf Kansteiner - Finding Meaning in Memory: A Methodological Critique of Collective Memory Studies | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 179-197
The memory wave in the humanities has contributed to the impressive revival of cultural history, but the success of memory studies has not been accompanied by significant conceptual and methodological advances in the research of collective memory processes. Most studies on memory focus on the representation of specific events within particular chronological, geographical, and media settings without reflecting on the audiences of the representations in question. As a result, the wealth of new insights into past and present historical cultures cannot be linked conclusively to specific social collectives and their historical consciousness. This methodological problem is even enhanced by the metaphorical use of psychological and neurological terminology, which misrepresents the social dynamics of collective memory as an effect and extension of individual, autobiographical memory. Some of these shortcomings can be addressed through the extensive contextualization of specific strategies of representation, which links facts of representation with facts of reception. As a result, the history of collective memory would be recast as a complex process of cultural production and consumption that acknowledges the persistence of cultural traditions as well as the ingenuity of memory makers and the subversive interests of memory consumers. The negotiations among these three different historical agents create the rules of engagement in the competitive arena of memory politics, and the reconstruction of these negotiations helps us distinguish among the abundance of failed collective memory initiatives on the one hand and the few cases of successful collective memory construction on the other. For this purpose, collective memory studies should adopt the methods of communication and media studies, especially with regard to media reception, and continue to use a wide range of interpretive tools from traditional historiography to poststructural approaches. From the perspective of collective memory studies, these two traditions are closely related and mutually beneficial, rather than mutually exclusive, ways of analyzing historical cultures. -- a sort of mini lit survey -- cited by more than 25 in jstor -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  cultural_history  memory-group  memory_studies  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
George Steinmetz - Charles Tilly, German Historicism, and the Critical Realist Philosophy of Science | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 312-336
This paper examines Charles Tilly's relationship to the schools of thought known as historicism and critical realism. Tilly was committed to a social epistemology that was inherently historicist, and he increasingly called himself a "historicist." The "search for grand laws in human affairs comparable to the laws of Newtonian mechanics," he argued, was a "waste of time" and had "utterly failed." Tilly's approach was strongly reminiscent of the arguments developed in the first half of the 20th century by Rickert, Weber, Troeltsch, and Meinecke for a synthesis of particularization and generalization and for a focus on "historical individuals" rather than abstract universals. Nonetheless, Tilly never openly engaged with this earlier wave of historicist sociology, despite its fruitfulness for and similarity to his own project. The paper explores some of the possible reasons for this missed encounter. The paper argues further that Tilly's program of "relational realism" resembled critical realism, but with main two differences: Tilly did not fully embrace critical realism's argument that social mechanisms are always co-constituted by social meaning or its normative program of explanatory critique. In order to continue developing Tilly's ideas it is crucial to connect them to the epistemological ideas that governed the first wave of historicist sociology in Weimar Germany and to a version of philosophical realism that is interpretivist and critical. -- 199 references! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  intellectual_history  20thC  Germany  historicism  Weber  positivism  covering_laws  scientism  critical_realism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Pierson - Increasing Returns, Path Dependence, and the Study of Politics | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 94, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 251-267
It is increasingly common for social scientists to describe political processes as "path dependent." The concept, however, is often employed without careful elaboration. This article conceptualizes path dependence as a social process grounded in a dynamic of "increasing returns." Reviewing recent literature in economics and suggesting extensions to the world of politics, the article demonstrates that increasing returns processes are likely to be prevalent, and that good analytical foundations exist for exploring their, causes and consequences. The investigation of increasing returns can provide a more rigorous framework for developing some of the key claims of recent scholarship in historical institutionalism: Specific patterns of timing and sequence matter; a wide range of social outcomes may be possible; large consequences may result from relatively small or contingent events; particular courses of action, once introduced, can be almost impossible to reverse; and consequently, political development is punctuated by critical moments or junctures that shape the basic contours of social life. -- cited by more than 100 jstor articles! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  methodology  political_change  political_economy  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_economics  contingency  path-dependency  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark M. Blyth - "Any More Bright Ideas?" The Ideational Turn of Comparative Political Economy | JSTOR: Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jan., 1997), pp. 229-250
Review article - (1) Ideas and Foreign Policy: Beliefs, Institutions and Political Change by Judith Goldstein; Robert Keohane; (2) Ideas and Institutions: Developmentalism in Argentina and Brazil by Kathryn Sikkink -- The renewed interest in ideas as an explanatory category in political economy, particularly among rationalist and historical institutionalists, is flawed. This turn to ideas is theoretically degenerate; it treats ideas as desiderata, catch-all concepts to explain variance, rather than subjects in their own right. The two schools ask what stabilizes and what causes change, not what ideas are and what they do. The ideational turn taken by both rationalist and historical institutionalists is best understood as an ad hoc solution to the inherent weaknesses of their research programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  rational_choice  political_economy  ideas-social_theory  social_process  social_movements  socialization  sociology-process  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutionalization  IR_theory  international_organizations  development  Latin_America  political_change  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Slez and John Levi Martin - Political Action and Party Formation in the United States Constitutional Convention | JSTOR: American Sociological Review, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Feb., 2007), pp. 42-67
Using data on state voting patterns, we examine the positions taken by state delegations on questions that arose over the course of the United States Constitutional Convention of 1787. Whereas existing accounts tend to assume that this type of collective decision making can be understood by linking fixed interests-either material or ideological-to specific, decontextualized propositions, we argue that the meaning of any one issue was dependent upon its position relative to other issues in the overall sequence of questions. Consequently, each decision changed the meaning of future issues, and hence how actors understood where their commonalities of interest lay. Devoted to the task of rebuilding the institutions that constituted the national state, delegates explicitly reshaped the board on which the political game would be played such that patterns of action within the Convention had implications for patterns of action outside of the Convention. As each subsequent decision within the Convention fixed a previous point of contention, it also indirectly determined which issues would become viable points of conflict in the future. By the end of the Convention, even before the first presidential election, state delegations began to arrange themselves in a manner consonant with the outlines of the first party system. This previously unrecognized finding only makes sense, however, in terms of a temporally contextualized model of political action. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  historical_sociology  game_theory  18thC  Early_Republic  US_constitution  parties  interest_groups  rational_choice  networks-social  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Tim Büthe - Taking Temporality Seriously: Modeling History and the Use of Narratives as Evidence | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 96, No. 3 (Sep., 2002), pp. 481-493
Social scientists interested in explaining historical processes can, indeed should, refuse the choice between modeling causal relationships and studying history. Identifying temporality as the defining characteristic of processes that can be meaningfully distinguished as "history," I show that modeling such phenomena engenders particular difficulties but is both possible and fruitful. Narratives, as a way of presenting empirical information, have distinctive strengths that make them especially suited for historical scholarship, and structuring the narratives based on the model allows us to treat them as data on which to test the model. At the same time, this use of narratives raises methodological problems not identified in recent debates. I specify these problems, analyze their implications, and suggest ways of solving or minimizing them. There is no inherent incompatibility between-but much potential gain from-modeling history and using historical narratives as data. -- over 100 references and frequently cited -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  causation-social  narrative  methodology  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Edgar Kiser and Michael Hechter - The Debate on Historical Sociology: Rational Choice Theory and Its Critics | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 104, No. 3 (November 1998), pp. 785-816
In the past two decades, many sociologists have denied the usefulness of general theories in favor of more particularistic approaches to historical explanation, which makes it difficult to specify both the causal relations and the causal mechanisms that account for social outcomes. This article offers some philosophical and theoretical justifications for the use of general theory in historical analysis and contends that general theory guides the selection of facts, provides a source of generalizable causal mechanisms, facilitates the cumulation of knowledge across substantive domains, reveals anomalies that lead to new questions, and creates the conditions under which existing theories can be supplanted by superior ones. The authors further outline the concrete research practices that flow from their approach and discuss several empirical studies that exemplify these five advantages. -- cited by 20 in jstor -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  causation-social  mechanisms-social_theory  rational_choice  explanation  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Mahoney - Path Dependence in Historical Sociology | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 29, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 507-548
Useful notion if it can be operationalized as something more than "history matters" -- more than 100 references and more than 60 jstor articles cite this article -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  path-dependency  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_economics  rational_choice  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ivan Ermakoff - Theory of practice, rational choice, and historical change | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 5 (September 2010), pp. 527-553
If we are to believe the proponents of the Theory of Practice and of Rational Choice, the gap between these two paradigmatic approaches cannot be bridged. They rely on ontological premises, theories of motivations and causal models that stand too far apart. In this article, I argue that this theoretical antinomy loses much of its edge when we take as objects of sociological investigation processes of historical change, that is, when we try to specify in theoretical terms how and in which conditions historical actors enact and endorse shifts in patterns of relations as well as shifts in the symbolic and cognitive categories that make these relations significant. I substantiate this argument in light of the distinction between two temporalities of historical change: first, the long waves of gradual change and, second, the short waves of moments of breaks and ruptures. Along the way, I develop an argument about the conditions of emergence of self-limiting norms and the centrality of epistemic beliefs in situations of high disruption. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- from keywords looks like it uses marriage patterns e.g. endogamy as illustrations -- didn't download
article  jstor  historical_sociology  historical_change  Bourdieu  rational_choice  social_capital  rationality  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier - History, Time, and Space | Republics of Letters - Volume 2, Issue 2 (March 2011)
Downloaded pdf to Note - looks like specifically commissioned historiography reflections after "crisis of history" in 1980s and 1990s - very useful Continental view with helpful ftnts - lead article in issue but doesn't deal with the Forum - read and annotated
article  historiography  cultural_history  microhistory  global_history  periodization  geography  circulation-people  nation-state  narrative  rhetoric  fiction  White_Hayden  Foucault  Annales  Ricoeur  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  historical_sociology  historical_change  evidence  verisimilitude  antiquaries  historiography-18thC  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Bearman, Robert Faris and James Moody - Blocking the Future: New Solutions for Old Problems in Historical Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter, 1999), pp. 501-533
Good bibliography for recent work in history and sociology on networks, events selection for explanation, creation of bounded "cases" within which network analysis applied to events, not just social relations, can produce explanation -- opens with focus on meaning rather than causation, though speculate that historical processes less subject to contingency than most historians believe -- see jstor information page for multiple cites to the article
article  jstor  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  historical_change  methodology  event  networks  networks-social  contingency  agency-structure  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
TOC - Polity Forum: Institutions and Institutionalism | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 28, No. 1, Autumn, 1995
Polity Forum: Institutions and Institutionalism - [Introduction](p. 83) *--* (1) The Common Space of Social Science Inquiry (pp. 85-90) Philip J. Ethington and Eileen L. McDonagh. *--* (2) Order and Change (pp. 91-96) Stephen Skowronek. *--* (3) Ideas and Institutions (pp. 97-101) Karen Orren. *--* (4) Why I Am an Historical Institutionalist (pp. 103-106) Theda Skocpol. *--* (5) Rational Choice and the New(?) Institutionalism (pp. 107-115) Morris Fiorina. *--* (6) The Many Lives of Institutionalism in American Social Science (pp. 117-123) Dorothy Ross. *--* (7) Institutionalism, Rational Choice, and Historical Analysis (pp. 125-128) James T. Kloppenberg. *--* (8) Institutionalism and Institutions in the Stream of History (pp. 129-133) Terrence J. McDonald. *--* (9) Ideas, Institutions, and Strategic Choice (pp. 135-140) Rogers M. Smith
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  social_sciences  political_science  institutions  institutional_change  institutionalization  historical_sociology  rational_choice  scientism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Tilly, review essay - Three Visions of History and Theory | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 2 (May, 2007), pp. 299-307
Reviewed work(s): (1) History and Social Theory by Peter Burke; (2) Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology by Julia Adams; Elisabeth S. Clemens; Ann Shola Orloff; (3) The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis by Robert E. Goodin; Charles Tilly
books  reviews  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  methodology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Diehl and Daniel McFarland - Toward a Historical Sociology of Social Situations | American Journal of Sociology JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 115, No. 6 (May 2010), pp. 1713-1752
In recent years there has been a growing call to historicize sociology by paying more attention to the contextual importance of time and place as well as to issues of process and contingency. Meeting this goal requires bringing historical sociology and interactionism into greater conversation via a historical theory of social situations. Toward this end, the authors of this article draw on Erving Goffman's work in Frame Analysis to conceptualize experience in social situations as grounded in multilayered cognitive frames and to demonstrate how such a framework helps illuminate historical changes in situated interaction.
article  jstor  paywall  social_theory  sociology  historical_sociology  historical_change  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexandra Walsham - The Reformation and 'The Disenchantment of the World' Reassessed | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Jun., 2008), pp. 497-528
This essay is a critical historiographical overview of the ongoing debate about the role of the Protestant Reformation in the process of 'the disenchantment of the world'. It considers the development of this thesis in the work of Max Weber and subsequent scholars, its links with wider claims about the origins of modernity, and the challenges to this influential paradigm that have emerged in the last twenty-five years. Setting the literature on England within its wider European context, it explores the links between Protestantism and the transformation of assumptions about the sacred and the supernatural, and places renewed emphasis on the equivocal and ambiguous legacy left by the upheavals of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Attention is also paid to the ways in which the Reformation converged with other intellectual, cultural, political, and social developments which cumulatively brought about subtle, but decisive, transformations in individual and collective mentalities. It is suggested that thinking in terms of cycles of desacralization and resacralization may help to counteract the potential distortions of a narrative that emphasizes a linear path of development.
article  jstor  social_theory  modernity  secularization  Weber  Reformation  historical_sociology  historiography  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_history  religious_culture  social_history  intellectual_history  political_history  scepticism  religious_wars  church_history  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Szreter - The State of Social Capital: Bringing Back in Power, Politics, and History | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 31, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 573-621
Extensively cited -- starts with critique of Putnam's Bowling Alone -- interested in processes of long term change -- using US history, sees significant role of the state in change process -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  social_capital  US_government  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Santa Arias: Rethinking space: an outsider's view of the spatial turn | JSTOR: GeoJournal, Vol. 75, No. 1 (2010), pp. 29-41
On Springer site - interesting collection of references on jstor - Geographical concerns with space and place have escaped the confines of the discipline of geography. Many humanities scholars now invoke such conceptions as a means to integrate diverse sources of information and to understand how broad social processes play out unevenly in different locations. The social production of spatiality thus offers a rich opportunity to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogues between different schools of critical theory. Following a brief assessment of the spatial turn in history, history of science, and political philosophy, this paper explores its implications for literary and cultural studies. It invokes a detailed case study of late 18th century Lima, Peru to explicate the dynamics of colonialism, the construction of racial identities, and different power/knowledge configurations within a particular locale. Space in this example appears as both matter and meaning, i. e., as simultaneously tangible and intangible, as a set of social circumstances and physical landscapes and as a constellation of discourses that simultaneously reflected, constituted, and at times undermined, the hegemonic social order. The intent is to demonstrate how multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship can be facilitated by paying attention to the unique of circumstances that define places within given historical moments. As seen in this example from literary colonial studies, other disciplines, therefore, can both draw from and contribute to poststructuralist interpretations of space as a negotiated set of situated practices.
article  jstor  historiography  geography  cultural_history  political_history  literary_history  networks  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  bibliography  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Making institutions Dec 2013
Looks at range of institutional work (Thelen, Pierson etc) - mostly praise for recent work that's a comparative combination of historical sociology, political science, political economy, with implications for work in Tilly's tradition of fiscal-military_state -- Wenkai HE's Paths toward the Modern Fiscal State: England, Japan, and China is a timely and interesting contribution. HE undertakes a comparative study of the emergence of what he calls the "modern fiscal state" in Britain, China, and Japan. He has undertaken to learn enough about these three cases in detail to be able to tell a reasonably detailed story of the emergence of this set of state tax and revenue institutions in the three settings, and he is thereby poised to consider some important institutional-causal questions about the innovations he observes. The book is a "cross-over" work, with political science methods and historical research content. The book combines new institutionalism, comparative historical sociology, and first-rate historical scholarship to make a compelling historical argument.. .... One thing that I particularly appreciate about HE's work is his ability to combine structure and agency into a single coherent analysis and explanation.
books  kindle-available  reviews  social_theory  historical_sociology  fiscal-military_state  political_economy  political_culture  institutions  bureaucracy  taxes  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  James_I  China  Japan  modernization  nation-state  governance  government_officials  governmentality  economic_history  Great_Divergence  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
NAKED KEYNESIANISM: The Fiscal-Military State and Western Hegemony - Nov 2013
An often neglected, at least in economics, argument for the rise of the West (leaving the debate of when the Big Divergence took place, if around 1800 or before, for another post), is its fiscal advantage when compared to the Oriental Empires (Mughal, Ottoman, Safavid and Qing). Patrick O'Brien, the prominent author of the idea of Western fiscal exceptionalism, suggests that the smaller and more urbanized polities of the West found it easier to tax their populations than the Eastern empires with more extensive territories, larger populations and less urbanized economies, even if the latter were in many respects more advanced than the former. The figure below shows that to some extent the Dutch dominance, and then the English ascension, go hand in hand with and increase of tax revenue as a share of GDP.

In this respect, the work by Jan Glete on the effects of a permanent navy on State formation deserves also careful reading.

However, the reasons for the militaristic nature of the Western economies is not well developed in the Fiscal-Military State literature. Kenneth Chase's book on the history of firearms provides an interesting answer.

He argues that early firearms were not very effective when used against cavalry because of their overall lack of mobility, poor rates of fire, and limited accuracy. As a result, their effectiveness was restricted to infantry and siege warfare, and were not used in regions threatened by nomads
economic_history  historical_sociology  Great_Divergence  fiscal-military_state  military_history  Military_Revolution  links 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little Why the corporation? « Understanding Society Sept 2012
Recently I posted about C. Wright Mills and his analysis of power elites in America (post). A major theme in Mills’s book is the new power associated with the American corporation following World War II. Charles Perrow’s Organizing America: Wealth, Power, and the Origins of Corporate Capitalism (2002) offers an historical account of how this system of power came into being. Perrow is a historical sociologist, and he focuses his analysis on the structural features of the organizations he considers; the historical and social factors that favored the emergence of these kinds of organizations; and the role that they now play within the complex social and political system of modern America.
books  kindle-available  reviews  economic_history  social_history  US_economy  US_politics  US_history  19thC  20thC  business  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  capitalism  capital  firms-theory  organizations  profit  infrastructure  historical_sociology  political_economy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Basics of Studying Power (2005)| Who Rules America
Intro to the "power research" section of Domhoff website Who Rules America - Nice overview of the methods used to infer the presence of various dimensions of "power" - he adopts Mann's 4 networks theory as orientation for his class dominance approach to modern societies - bibliography
social_theory  methodology  power  elites  networks  public_policy  classes  capitalism  politics-and-money  historical_sociology  bibliography  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Fred Block & Margaret Somers - In the Shadow of Speenhamland: Social Policy and the Old Poor Law | Politics & Society (2003)
doi: 10.1177/0032329203252272 Politics & Society June 2003 vol. 31 no. 2 283-323

In 1996, the U.S. Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Reconciliation Act that ended the entitlement of poor families to government assistance. The debate leading up to that transformation in welfare policy occurred in the shadow of Speenhamland—an episode in English Poor Law history. This article revisits the Speenhamland episode to unravel its tangled history. Drawing on four decades of recent scholarship, the authors show that Speenhamland policies could not have had the consequences that have been attributed to them. The article ends with an alternative narrative that seeks to explain how the Speenhamland story became so deeply entrenched.
paper18thC  Britain  economic_history  social_history  political_history  moral_economy  Poor_Laws  Labor_markets  historical_sociology  historiography  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard N. Langlois - The Institutional Revolution: A review essay - Springer
The Review of Austrian Economics
December 2013, Volume 26, Issue 4

This review essay discusses and appraises Douglas Allen’s The Institutional Revolution (2011) as a way of reflecting on the uses of the New Institutional Economics (NIE) in economic history. It praises and defends Allen’s method of asking “what economic problem were these institutions solving?” But it insists that such comparative-institutional analysis be imbedded within a deeper account of institutional change, one driven principally by changes – often endogenous changes – in the extent of the market and in relative scarcities. The essay supports its argument with a variety of examples of the NIE applied to economic history.
books  kindle-available  reviews  paywall  economic_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Britain  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  institutional_economics  institutions  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  NIE  cultural_history  causation-social  change-social  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Christiane Eisenberg: Embedding Markets in Temporal Structures: A Challenge to Economic Sociology and History (2011)
JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 3 (137) (2011), pp. 55-78 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The essay examines from a historian's point of view the approaches to the analysis of market exchange in new economic sociology and explores in which way sociology and history can cooperate in embedding markets in temporal structures. In a first step the author sharply criticises the favourable reception given to Karl Polanyi's work ``The Great Transformation'' in the field of new economic sociology. In particular she discusses the narrowing of research perspectives and its negative side effects on the sociology of markets. There then follows a second step: in order to find a linking point for interdisciplinary cooperation, beginning with the current state of historical research, the author makes several considerations on the significance of temporal structures and the time factor in general in analysing markets and market societies.
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  social_theory  lit_survey  markets  capitalism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Greta R. Krippner and Anthony S. Alvarez: Embeddedness and the Intellectual Projects of Economic Sociology (2007)
JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 33 (2007), pp. 219-240 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- In this review, we explore how the concept of embeddedness has shaped—and been shaped by—the evolution of the subfield of economic sociology. Although embeddedness is often taken as a conceptual umbrella for a single, if eclectic, approach to the sociological study of the economy, we argue that in fact the concept references two distinct intellectual projects. One project, following from Granovetter's (1985) well-known programmatic statement, attempts to discern the relational bases of social action in economic contexts. Another project, drawing from Polanyi's [1944 (2001), 1957, 1977] social theory, concerns the integration of the economy into broader social systems. Critically, these two formulations of embeddedness involve different views of the relationship between the economic and the social. The implication is that the obstacles to theoretical integration in economic sociology, while not insurmountable, are greater than is typically acknowledged.
article  jstor  social_theory  lit_survey  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  institutional_economics  markets  firms-theory  networks  social_sciences-post-WWII  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Rainer Diaz-Bone and Robert Salais - Special Issue intro - Economics of Convention and the History of Economies. Towards a Transdisciplinary Approach in Economic History (2011)
JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 4 (138) (2011), pp. 7-39 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- big list of references in lit survey -- This introduction and the contributions of the HSR issue intend to develop and to demonstrate the potentialities of the economics of convention (EC) for a transdisciplinary approach to the history of economies. "Convention" has become a core concept in the renewal of French social sciences from structuralism towards pragmatism. Conventions are interpretative schemes for action and coordination that persons and actors use in situations under conditions of uncertainty. Through repeated interaction they become an intimate part of the history, incorporated into justifications, behaviours and social objects like institutions. In contrast to neoclassic economics and to new historical institutionalism, the EC starts from assumptions of a plurality of economic frameworks of action, of the socio-historical construction of concepts, categories, and data. It rejects dichotomies, adopts a broad conception of the economy, conceives institutional change as the change of the "conventional" foundations for the pragmatic use and interpretation of institutions. Its methodology is that of a "complex pragmatist situationalism", dedicated to a comprehensive approach aiming at reconstructing the internal going-on of historical processes. This special issue offers a set of contributions on: the origins of the approach, its methodological standpoint, its possible developments towards a sociology of engagement or hermeneutical concerns, several applications on economic history (notably about conventions of quality and of labor).
article  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  pragmatism  historical_sociology  institutions  networks  economic_sociology  institutional_economics  cultural_history  economic_culture  lit_survey  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Kädtler: Financialisation of Capitalist Economies — Bargaining on Conventional Economic Rationalities (2011)
JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 4 (138) (2011), pp. 169-191 -- Special Issue: Conventions and Institutions from a Historical Perspective -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The paper deals with financialisation of capitalist economies since the 1990s drawing on a conventional concept of economic rationalities. It is argued that financial rationality is not the mere outcome of relations of power rooted elsewhere but a power resource on its own. It is analysed as one type of bounded rationality among others, the recent predominance of which traces back mainly to a paradigmatic shift in economics. However predominance does not mean unambiguousness. It is demonstrated that financial rationality on the level of companies or companies' strategies always has to be interpreted and specified in the perspective of other rationalities. And effective financialised strategies are always the outcome of bargaining between social actors bringing into play various interests, power resources, and rationalities. The financial and economic crisis since 2007 is perceived as symptomatic for a new kind of systemic instabilities caused by the predominance of financial rationality.
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  institutional_economics  markets  financial_system  financialization  rationality-economics  power  financial_crisis  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
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