dunnettreader + historians   18

HERMAN PAUL - DISTANCE AND SELF-DISTANCIATION: INTELLECTUAL VIRTUE AND HISTORICAL METHOD AROUND 1900 | JSTOR History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 104-116 -- What did "historical distance" mean to historians in the Rankean tradition? Although historical distance is often equated with temporal distance, an analysis of Ernst Bernheim's Lehrbuch der historischen Methode reveals that for German historians around 1900 distance did not primarily refer to a passage of time that would enable scholars to study remote pasts from retrospective points of view. -- the metaphor rather conveys a need for self-distanciation. Self-distanciation is not a Romantic desire to "extinguish" oneself, but a virtuous attempt to put one's own ideas and intuitions about the working of the world between brackets in the study of people who might have understood the world in different terms. Although Bernheim did not explicitly talk about virtue, the article shows that his Lehrbuch nonetheless considers self-distanciation a matter of virtuous behavior, targeted at an aim that may not be fully realizable, but ought to be pursued with all possible vigor. For Bernheim, then, distance requires epistemological virtue, which in turn calls for intellectual character, or what Bernheim's generation considered scholarly selfhood {wissenschaftliche Persönlichkeit). Not a mapping of time onto space, but a strenuous effort to mold "scholarly characters," truly able to recognize the otherness of the past, appears to be characteristic of Bernheim's view of historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  historians  epistemology-history  virtue  epistemic_virtue  character  character-formation  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK SALBER PHILLIPS - RETHINKING HISTORICAL DISTANCE: FROM DOCTRINE TO HEURISTIC | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 11-23 -- I argue that distance needs to be reconceived in terms of the wider set of engagements that mediate our relations to the past, as well as the full spectrum of distance-positions from near to far. Re-imagined in these terms, distance sheds its prescriptiveness and becomes a valuable heuristic for examining the history of historical representation. When distance is studied in relation to the range of mediations entailed in historical representation, it becomes evident that the plasticities of distance/proximity are by no means limited to gradients of time; rather, temporality is bound up with other distances that come from our need to engage with the historical past as (simultaneously) a realm of making, oí feeling, of doing, and of understanding. Thus for every historical work, we need to consider at least four basic dimensions of representation as they relate to the problem of mediating distance: 1. the genres, media, and vocabularies that shape the history's formal structures of representation; 2. the affective claims made by the historical account, including the emotional experiences it promises or withholds; 3. the work's implications for action, whether of a political or moral nature; and 4. the modes of understanding on which the history's intelligibility depends. These overlapping, but distinctive, distances—formal, affective, ideological, and conceptual—provide an analytic framework for examining changing modes of historical representation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historicism  philosophy_of_history  historians  genre  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  reception  epistemology-history  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
François Jarrige, « E. P. Thompson, une vie de combat » | La Vie des idées, 6 janvier 2015
Grand historien de la classe ouvrière anglaise, figure intellectuelle majeure des débats sur le marxisme dans les années 1960-1970, militant antinucléaire à l’origine d’une critique écologiste du capitalisme : tels furent les visages multiples d’Edward Palmer Thompson, dont l’œuvre continue d’imprégner en profondeur l’ensemble des sciences sociales. -- the French are (re)discovering Thompson and his particular version of a Marxian approach that was highly allergic to Theory. -- extensive footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  historians  historians-and-politics  historiography  historiography-postWWII  20thC  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  working_class  Thompson_EP  moral_economy  morality-conventional  norms  Industrial_Revolution  Marxist  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  Marxism  industrialization  Whigs-oligarchy  property_rights  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  environment  sustainability  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-17thC  historians  historiography-19thC  Mabillon  historicism  German_scholarship  Eliot_George  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Papacy  Restoration  Charles_II  US_Civil_War  biography-writing  Calvin  Franco-Prussian_war  Napoleon  British_history  French_Revolution  Spanish_Empire  Latin_America  imperialism  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  reviews  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Talleyrand  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Anthony Froude - Historical and Other Sketches (US collection 1883) - Google Books
Editor David Hilton Wheeler - Issue 95 of Standard library, Funk & Wagnalls, 1883 -- Contents - doesn't include essays for which Froude was (in)famous - some of his travel writings as well as a few substantive historical pieces, though more biography *--* Introduction pgs 5-40 (lengthy history of controversies Froude involved in, starting with his attachment to Newman and Tractarians at Oxford pre Newman going over to Rome, Froude not only not following him, but left the Anglican ministry, and since that made him ineligible for other profession, made his subsequent living as a man of letters) *--* A Siding at a Railway Station *--* IT The Nobway Fjords *--* A Cagliostro of the Second Century *--* Social Condition of England in the Sixteenth Century *--* Coronation of Anne Boleyn *--* John Bunyan *--* Leaves from a South African Journal *--* A Days Fishing at Cheneys *--* Thomas Carlyle and His Wife *--* Political Economy of the Eighteenth Century *--* Reynard the Fox -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  religious_history  church_history  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Church_of_England  university  historiography-19thC  historians  historians-and-religion  Tractarians  Newman_JH  Catholics-England  British_history  British_politics  social_history  political_economy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Henry_VIII  Tudor  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Linda Kirk, historiographical review - The Matter of Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1129-1143
Recent work on the Enlightenment continues to bear out the importance of context in shaping both what is written and how it is read. In the case of the French Revolution, largely thanks to the work of Robert Darnton, studies have come to focus on how, if at all, different layers and styles of dissidence helped to bring down the French monarchy. But not all writing has, or need be suspected of, such an obvious or immediate outcome. This period, for instance, sees the birth of `philosophical' history, as John Pocock and others have made us aware. Here again, contexts and individual experience shape what is studied and written, but it is clear that the project common to the best-selling work of, for instance, Gibbon, Hume and Robertson was to explain how civil society emerged and thrived. This inquiry, and what it says about the separate states and common principles of Europe then and now, is unfinished business; so, too, is determining what historical knowing is, and cannot be. What the eighteenth century undeniably saw, even from the slightly educated, was a growing appetite for understanding and for improvement: these have proved necessary, if not sufficient, conditions for modernity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  historians  public_sphere  publishing  improvement  French_Revolution  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Hesketh - Diagnosing Froude's Disease: Boundary Work and the Discipline of History in Late-Victorian Britain | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 47, No. 3 (Oct., 2008), pp. 373-395
Historians looking to make history a professional discipline of study in Victorian Britain believed they had to establish firm boundaries demarcating history from other literary disciplines. James Anthony Froude ignored such boundaries. The popularity of his historical narratives was a constant reminder of the continued existence of a supposedly overturned phase of historiography in which the historian was also a man of letters, transcending the boundary separating fact from fiction and literature from history. Just as professionalizing historians were constructing a methodology that called on historians to be inductive empirical workers, Froude refused to accept the new science of history, and suggested instead that history was an individual enterprise, one more concerned with drama and art than with science. E. A. Freeman warned the historical community that they "cannot welcome [Froude] as a partner in their labors, as a fellow-worker in the cause of historic truth." This article examines the boundary work of a professionalizing history by considering the attempt to exclude Froude from the historian's discourse, an attempt that involved a communal campaign that sought to represent Froude as "constitutionally inaccurate." Froude suffered from "an inborn and incurable twist," argued Freeman, thereby diagnosing "Froude's disease" as the inability to "make an accurate statement about any matter." By unpacking the construction of "Froude's disease," the article exposes the disciplinary techniques at work in the professionalization of history, techniques that sought to exclude non-scientific modes of thought such as that offered by Froude. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  19thC  British_history  historians  professionalization  historiography-19thC  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Voltaire Historian by J. H. Brumfitt (1958)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1958), pp. 192-194 -- slams it for not adequately putting Voltaire's priorities and view of historical change in adequate context -- not just Pyrrhonism quarrels but loss of authority of past for Moderns
books  reviews  Pocock  Voltaire  historiography  18thC  French_Enlightenment  historians  érudits  Ancients_v_Moderns  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Alfred Hiatt: Alfred Hiatt: Diplomatic Arts: Hickes against Mabillon in the Republic of Letters (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Jul., 2009), pp. 351-373 -- disputes re documentary evidence standards in Republic of Letters between French and Continental followers of Mabillon and English scholars -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  historiography  historians  antiquaries  evidence  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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