dunnettreader + hermeticism   7

Kocku von Stuckrad, "The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000" (De Gruyter, 2014)
Kocku von Stuckrad, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen, demonstrates how the construction of what constitutes 'religion' and 'science' was a relational process that emerged with the competition between various systems of knowledge. He traces the transformation and perpetuation of religious discourses as a result of their entanglement with secular academic discourses. In the first half of the book, he presents the discursive constructions of 'religion' and 'science' through the disciplines of astrology, astronomy, psychology, alchemy, chemistry, and scientific experimentation more generally. The second half of the book explores the power of academic legitimization of knowledge in emerging European modernities. Here, the discursive entanglements of professional and participant explanations of modern practices shaped and solidified those realities. Key figures in the history of the field of Religious Studies, such as Martin Buber, Gershom Scholem, Rudolf Otto, and Mircea Eliade, played instrumental roles in legitimizing the authority of mysticism, goddess worship, and shamanism. Ultimately, what we discover is that 'religion' and 'science' are not so much distinctive spheres but elastic systems that arise within the particular circumstances of secular modernity. In our conversation we discussed discursive approaches to the study of religion, the Theosophical Society, marginalized forms of knowledge, the occult sciences, Jewish mysticism, secularization, nature-focused spiritualities, experiential knowledge, pagan religious practices, and 'modern' science
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  sociology_of_knowledge  science-and-religion  19thC  20thC  mysticism  secularization  ritual  pagans  hermeticism  Kabbalah  alchemy  astrology  astronomy  experimental_philosophy  scientific_method 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Donald S. Lopez, Jr.- The evolution of a text: The Tibetan Book of the Dead | The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography published by Princeton University Press © 2011. -- In a footnote to his introduction, Evans-Wentz writes that he and Kazi Dawa Samdup felt, “that without such safeguarding as this Introduction is intended to afford, the Bardo Thodol translation would be peculiarly liable to misinterpretation and consequent misuse . . .” They could have had little idea of the myriad ways in which their collaboration would be read. Removing the Bardo Todol from the moorings of language and culture, of time and place, Evans-Wentz transformed it into The Tibetan Book of the Dead and set it afloat in space, touching down at various moments in various cultures over the course of the past century, providing in each case an occasion to imagine what it might mean to be dead. This biography tells the strange story of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. It argues that the persistence of its popularity derives from three factors: The first is the human obsession with death. The second is the Western romance of Tibet. The third is Evans-Wentz’s way of making the Tibetan text into something that is somehow American. Evans-Wentz’s classic is not so much Tibetan as it is American, a product of American Spiritualism. Indeed, it might be counted among its classic texts. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  20thC  21stC  translation  religious_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  sociology_of_religion  spirituality  readership  reader_response  cultural_exchange  cultural_transmission  esotericism  hermeticism  Buddhism  Tibet  orientalism  New_Age  death  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein, ed. - The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much | Voltaire Foundation -Jan 2010
Historians of 18thC thought have implied a clear distinction between mystical or occult writing, often termed ‘illuminist’, and better-known forms of Enlightenment thinking and culture. But where are the boundaries of ‘enlightened’ human understanding? (..the.) contributors (..) put forward a completely new way of configuring these seemingly antithetical currents of thought, and identify a grey area that binds the two, a ‘Super-Enlightenment’. (..) exploring the social, religious, artistic, political and scientific dimensions of the Super-Enlightenment, contributors demonstrate the co-existence of apparent opposites: the enlightened and the esoteric, empiricism and imagination, history and myth, the secretive and the public, mysticism and science. The Enlightenment can no longer be seen as a sturdy, homogeneous movement defined by certain core beliefs, but one which oscillates between opposing poles in its social practices, historiography and even its epistemology: between daring to know, and daring to know too much. ** Dan Edelstein, Introduction to the Super-Enlightenment -- I. What limits of understanding? ** Peter Reill, The hermetic imagination in the high and late Enlightenment ** David Bates, Super-epistemology ** Jessica Riskin, Mr Machine and the imperial me -- II. The arts of knowing ** Liana Vardi, Physiocratic visions ** Anthony Vidler, For the love of architecture: Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and the Hypnerotomachia ** Fabienne Moore, The poetry of the Super-Enlightenment: the theories and practices of Cazotte, Chassaignon, Mercier, Saint-Martin and Bonneville -- III. Sacred societies ** Natalie Bayer, What do you seek from us? Wisdom? Virtue? Enlightenment? Inventing a Masonic science of man in Russia ** Kris Pangburn, Bonnet’s theory of palingenesis: an ‘Enlightened’ account of personal resurrection? ** Dan Edelstein, The Egyptian French Revolution: antiquarianism, Freemasonry and the mythology of nature ** Tili Boon Cuillé, From myth to religion in Ossian’s France
books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  hermeticism  Freemasonry  antiquaries  epistemology  ancient_religions  ancient_Egypt  occult  immortality  myth  religion  comparative_religion  French_lit  poetics  Russia  Physiocrats  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  noble_savage  national_origins  antiquity  historiography-18thC 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Corrado Bologna - Le retour des dieux anciens : Giulio Camillo et Fontainebleau | Italique, V, 2002, p109-138.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.152 **--** En ce début de XVIème, après des siècles d’absence, les dieux anciens “sont de retour” à Fontainebleau. Ils tapissent les murs, remplissent les bibliothèques, les salons royaux, les salles sévères des écoles universitaires. Leur présence inaugure une nouvelle mythographie et presque une nouvelle théologie païenne. Ce sont des dieux et des héros élégants, sophistiqués, très différents de ceux que, au milieu des années vingt, un grand élève de Raphaël, Giulio Romano, s’inspirant aux modèles antiques, inscrit de leur naturel de chair toute rosée et déjà flasque, où tant de maniéristes et de baroques trouveront leur inspiration, sur les murs de Palazzo Te à Mantoue. .La censure ecclésiastique et aussi politique déchaînent immédiatement une forte polémique (dont, à la fin du siècle et au terme du Concile de Trente, l’ouvrage de Gabriele Paleotti sanctionnera victorieusement la fin) à l’encontre de ce très heureux moment de paganisme potentiellement absolu, subversif, qui me semble proposer non pas tant un “retour à l’Esprit Classique”, qu’un “retour de l’Esprit Classique”. En songeant davantage et d’abord à la “cour païenne” du roi très chrétien à Fontainebleau plutôt qu’à la Rome “ville sacrée” du grand baroque de Bernin, je parlerais donc d’une « Présence réelle » de la mythologie paganisante que certains grands Italiens entent en France. -- gobs of footnotes and references - downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  art_history  literary_history  cultural_history  religious_history  16thC  France  Renaissance  pagans  gods-antiquity  cosmology  hermeticism  Neoplatonism  François_I  Henri_II  elite_culture  court_culture  Italian_influence  Counter-Reformation  baroque  myth  bibliography  artists  exiles  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation | Philosophy and Literature 16 (1992): 432-37
Delightful Denis Dutton review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge University Press, $39.95 hardbound, $11.95 paper) -- presents three lectures by Umberto Eco, with responses by Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler, and Christine Brooke-Rose, a final rejoinder by Eco, and a general introduction by Stefan Collini. The occasion was the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures, and they apparently packed out one of the biggest auditoriums at Cambridge University in 1990. There was more debate, including Frank Kermode, Malcolm Bradbury, and David Lodge, than is included here, and one imagines it was an exciting occasion. -- quite splendid description of debate between Eco and Rorty. Culler who is more open ended than Eco on limits to interpretation turns his guns on the self described American pragmatists, Rorty and Stanley Fish. Needless to say Dutton is reluctant to put Rorty in the same tradition as Dewey - Eco's voracious curiosity and wonder about the world is more in Dewey’s line - and is appalled at labeling Fish a pragmatist. Definitely to buy.
books  reviews  find  amazon.com  lit_crit  literary_theory  hermeneutics  hermeticism  gnostic  interpretivism  deconstruction  reader_response  intentionality  Eco  Rorty  pragmatism 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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