dunnettreader + hermeneutics   44

David Brakke - Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas | The Great Courses
Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas
Professor of religious studies and history at Ohio State
24 lectures
Uniformly rave reviews from people with good academic background in Early Christianity and comparative religion
Neoplatonism  theology  eschatology  ecclesiology  manichaean  gnostic  heterodoxy  creation  late_antiquity  hermeneutics  Early_Christian  archaeology  esotericism  manuscripts  audio  proto-orthodox  evil  soteriology  church_history  video  religious_history  courses  Trinity  God-attributes  heresy 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell, review essay - On historiography and theory confusion in Political Theory and its texts | JSTOR - The American Political Science Review (1986)
Reviewed Works: Texts in Context: Revisionist Methods for Studying the History of Political Theory by David Boucher; The Status and Appraisal of Classic Texts: An Essay on Political Theory, Its Inheritance, and the History of Ideas by Conal Condren
Review by: John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 80, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 631-639
behavioralism  intellectual_history  hermeneutics  political_philosophy  historiography  Skinner  contextualism  reviews  downloaded  books  social_theory  Cambridge_School  Pocock  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology | JSTOR- The American Political Science Review (1982)
Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology
John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 76, No. 2 (Jun., 1982), pp. 317-327 -- Recent challenges to traditional approaches and purposes for studying the history of political theory have raised questions about its constitution as both a subject matter and subfield of political science. Methodological arguments advocating what is characterized as a more truly historical mode of inquiry for understanding political ideas and recovering textual meaning have become increasingly popular. The relationship of these hermeneutical claims about historicity, such as that advanced by Quentin Skinner, to the actual practice of interpretation is problematical. Such claims are more a defense of a certain norm of historical investigation than a method of interpretation, and the implications of this norm for the reconstitution of the history of political theory require careful consideration. -- interesting collection of references re hermeneutics debates- Not just Anglo but eg Gadamer -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
hermeneutics  Cambridge_School  political_philosophy  jstor  Skinner  political_discourse  political_science  intellectual_history  article  Gadamer  historiography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Josine H. Blok - Quests for a Scientific Mythology: F. Creuzer and K. O. Müller on History and Myth | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 1994)
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 26-52 -- Classical scholarship played a vital role in the intellectual concerns of early 19thC Germany. ... Greek mythology in particular was expected to shed light on the origins of civilization. In the search for the true nature of myth, the hermeneutic problems involved in historical understanding were intensified. As myth was held to be of a different nature than rationality, to read the sources was to look for a completely different referent of the texts than was the case in historical reconstruction. In the quests for a scientific mythology, K. O. Müller (1797-1840) was often regarded as an opponent of F. Creuzer (1771-1858). Yet an analysis of their published work and of their private documents shows that they had much in common -- deeply Romantic views on the religious origin of culture, in Müller's case inspired by Pietism, in Creuzer's by neo-Platonism. -- Müller differed from Creuzer in his views on the relationship of myth to history. Myth was not the reflection of a universal religion, sustained by a priestly class (as Creuzer had claimed), but the outcome of the encounter between the mental endowment of a people and local, historical circumstances. In the case of the Amazons, however, Müller assessed the connection of myth to history in defiance of his own theory, guided by his views on gender difference and on sexual morality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  epistemology-history  Hellenophiles  German_scholars  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Pietist  Neoplatonism  cultural_history  cultural_authority  cultural_transmission  religious_history  religious_culture  national_origins  historical_change  teleology  Amazons  ancient_history  myth  cultural_influence  cultural_change  positivism  hermeneutics  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
ADRIAN BLAU - UNCERTAINTY AND THE HISTORY OF IDEAS | JSTOR - History and Theory (Oct 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 358-372 -- Intellectual historians often make empirical claims, but can never know for certain if these claims are right. Uncertainty is thus inevitable for intellectual historians. But accepting uncertainty is not enough: we should also act on it, by trying to reduce and report it. We can reduce uncertainty by amassing valid data from different sources to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations, rather than trying to "prove" an empirical claim by looking for evidence that fits it. Then we should report our degree of certainty in our claims. When we answer empirical questions in intellectual history, we are not telling our readers what happened: we are telling them how strong we think our evidence is—a crucial shift of emphasis. For intellectual historians, then, uncertainty is subjective, as discussed by Keynes and Collingwood; the paper thus explores three differences between subjective and objective uncertainty. Having outlined the theoretical basis of uncertainty, the paper then offers examples from actual research: Noel Malcolm's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about composition, and David Wootton's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about beliefs. -- VERY Anti Straussian based on extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  intellectual_history-distorted  philosophy_of_history  hermeneutics  hermeneutics_of_suspicion  Strauss  Straussians  epistemology-history  evidence  coherence  uncertainty  Keynes  Keynes-uncertainty  Collingwood  objectivity  positivism  post-foundational  Cambridge_School  author_intention  reception  audience  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JEFFREY ANDREW BARASH - ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Fulltitle -- MYTH IN HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AS MYTH: ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF HANS BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF ERNST CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH, History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 328-340 This essay explores the different interpretations proposed by Ernst Cassirer and Hans Blumenberg of the relation between Platonic philosophy and myth as a means of bringing to light a fundamental divergence in their respective conceptions of what precisely myth is. It attempts to show that their conceptions of myth are closely related to their respective assumptions concerning the historical significance of myth and regarding the sense of history more generally. Their divergent conceptions of myth and of history, I argue, are at the same time not simply matters of abstract speculation, but spring from fundamental presuppositions concerning myth's political significance. The present elucidation aims not only to set in relief one or another of the ways in which Cassirer or Blumenberg understood myth, nor even to present Blumenberg's critical reception of Cassirer's theories, but above all to contribute to the interpretation of the political implications of myth and of its historical potency in our contemporary epoch. -- most ftnts to Blumenberg in German, especially Work on Myth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  cultural_history  political_culture  Blumenberg  Cassirer  myth  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  identity  national_tale  national_ID  symbols-political  symbols-religious  symbol  political_discourse  Platonism  Neoplatonism  German_Idealism  neo-Kantian  hermeneutics  political-theology  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
CHINATSU KOBAYASHI and MATHIEU MARION - GADAMER AND COLLINGWOOD ON TEMPORAL DISTANCE AND UNDERSTANDING | JSTOR History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 81-103 -- we begin by suggesting an intuitive model of time embodying a notion of temporal distance that we claim is at work in Gadamer's hermeneutics, while it is rejected in Collingwood's theory of interpretation. To show this, after a brief review of the influence of Collingwood on Gadamer and of their disagreement over the possibility of recovering an author's intention, we examine in turn their answers to the problem of transposition, upon which the philosophy of Dilthey supposedly foundered. We show that Gadamer embraced the idea of temporal distance in his solution, which consisted in claiming that the distance between an author from the past and us is filled in by tradition, which opens access to the text for us, while Collingwood considered explanations of the actions of historical agents, and by extension understanding of a text, in intentional or rational terms. Furthermore, he thought that such explanations are not causal, and that the thoughts involved in them do not stand within the flow of physical time, which is involved in any notion of temporal distance. This is why Collingwood felt entitled to anti-relativistic conclusions about the recovery of authorial intentions, conclusions that prompted Gadamer to claim that "the dimension of hermeneutical mediation which is passed through in every act of understanding" escaped him. We then discuss the underlying notions of time at work in both Gadamer and Collingwood, showing that Ricoeur had a better appreciation of the issue, since he saw that Collingwood's moves parallel, up to a point, Heidegger's critique of "vulgar time," albeit with an entirely different result. We also point to the importance in Collingwood's thinking of his notion of "incapsulation." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  phenomenology  hermeneutics  20thC  Gadamer  Collingwood  Ricoeur  Heidegger  historicism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Jeremy F. Walton - Moments from the lives of great religious books « The Immanent Frame - March 2011
“The Lives of Great Religious Books,” a promising new series from Princeton University Press, debuted this month with three titles—Martin E. Marty’s Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison, Donald Lopez’s The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography, and Garry Wills’ Augustine’s Confessions. On March 24, I had the opportunity to discuss “The Lives of Great Religious Books” with Professor Marty, Professor Lopez, and Vanessa Ochs, another author in the series, who is currently working on a biography of the Passover Haggadah. Above all, our conversation centered on the metaphor of a text’s biography, its purchase and limitations. Just as we might think of a human biography as a series of contexts linked together by a single individual, so too is the biography of a text a series of contexts linked by the text itself. We also weighed the importance of the series to the changing disciplinary purview of Religious Studies. For many years, Religious Studies was defined as a hermeneutical discipline based upon great texts, but the typical disciplinary approach was to treat the texts as hermetic, self-contained wholes upon which the scholar expounds and expands. With this series, however, we are witnessing a new willingness on the part of scholars in Religious Studies to approach the dynamic relationship between theological treatises and their social environments, between texts and contexts, as it were. -- downloaded pdf to Note and in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series" with the Immanent Frame posts on the 3 recently published "biographies" Waldron mentions
books  religious_lit  intellectual_history  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  hermeneutics  history_of_book  contextualism  religious_culture  religious_belief  disciplines  academia  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Originalism's Promise, and Its Limits by Lee J. Strang :: SSRN - 63 Cleveland State Law Review 81 (2014) (rev' June 2015)
University of Toledo College of Law -- In this Symposium Essay, I summarize originalism’s promise and limits. Part II succinctly explains originalism’s promise. Part III briefly describes originalism’s limits. Part IV then suggests that originalism’s limits contribute to its promise. -- PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: constitutional interpretation, originalism, nonoriginalism, normatively attractive, judicial capacity, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas -- saved to briefcase
article  SSRN  US_constitution  constitutional_law  originalism  Aristotle  Aquinas  hermeneutics  judiciary  judicial_review  natural_law 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Barzun and Dan Priel - Jurisprudence and (Its) History - Symposium Introduction | Virginia Law Review 101 Va. L. Rev. 849 (2015)
Whereas legal philosophers offer “analyses” that aim to be general, abstract, and timeless, legal historians offer “thick descriptions” of what is particular, concrete, and time-bound. But surface appearances can deceive. Perhaps unlike other areas of philosophy, the subject matter of jurisprudence is at least partially (if not entirely) a social phenomenon. Courts, legislatures, judicial orders, and statutes are the products of human efforts, both collective and individual, and they only exist as legislatures, courts, and the like insofar as they possess the meaning they do in the eyes of at least some social group. For this reason, legal philosophers since at least H.L.A. Hart have recognized their task to be a “hermeneutic” one—one which aims to discern or make explicit the “self-understanding” of legal actors. At the same time, legal historians aim not simply to record legal rules that existed at some given point in history, but to unearth the meaning that actual people—judges, lawyers, politicians, and ordinary citizens—have attached to law. When they do so, they might be seen as uncovering evidence of those same “self-understandings” that philosophers claim constitute law. Perhaps, then, philosophical and historical inquiries about law do not differ so radically from each other after all. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_language  ordinary_language_philosophy  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  historiography  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  constitutional_law  Founders  originalism  contextualism  change-social  change-economic  change-intellectual  norms  hermeneutics  positivism-legal  philosophy_of_history  institutional_change  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond BOUDON - LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER | JSTOR - L'Année sociologique - Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50
LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER - L'Année sociologique (1940/1948-), Troisième série, Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50 -- One of the most striking features of Weber's writings on religion is the frequency with which he uses the word rationality. This derives from the metatheory grounding in his mind the interpretative method. This metatheory asserts that the meaning to an individual of his beliefs should be seen as the main cause explaining why he endorses them. Weber's religion sociology owes its strength to this theoretical framework. His « rational » conception of religious beliefs does not imply that these beliefs derive from deliberation. They are rather transmitted to the social subject in the course of his socialisation. But they are accepted only if they are perceived by the subject as grounded. These principles inspire Weber's pages on magical beliefs, on animism, on the great religions, on the diffusion of monotheism, on theodicy or the world disenchantment. He shows that religious thinking cares on coherence, tends to verify and falsify religious dogmas by confronting them with observable facts. He develops a complex version of evolutionism, explaining the cases of irreversibility registered by the history of religions, but avoiding any fatalism. He rejects any depth psychology and any causalist psychology in his sociology of religion, the common rational psychology being the only one that can be easily made compatible with the notion of "Verstehende Soziologie", i.e. of « interpretative sociology ». Weber analyses the evolution of religious ideas supposing that they follow the same mechanisms as the evolution of ideas in other domains, as law, economics or science. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  sociology_of_religion  Weber  Boudon  rationality  causation  causation-social  religious_history  religious_belief  religious_culture  hermeneutics  social_theory  socialization  social_process  rationality-bounded  disenchantment  causation-evolutionary  psychology  mechanisms-social_theory  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Max Weber and the Dispute Over Reason and Value (Routledge, 1984) | bookmark for book abstract - Academia.edu
The problem of the nature of values and the relation between values and rationality is one of the defining issues of twentieth-century thought and Max Weber was one of the defining figures in the debate. In this book, Turner and Factor consider the development of the dispute over Max Weber's contribution to this discourse, by showing how Weber's views have been used, revised and adapted in new contexts. The story of the dispute is itself fascinating, for it cuts across the major political and intellectual currents of the twentieth century, from positivism, pragmatism and value-free social science, through the philosophy of Jaspers and Heidegger, to Critical Theory and the revival of Natural Right and Natural Law. As Weber's ideas were imported to Britain and America, they found new formulations and new adherents and critics and became absorbed into different traditions and new issues. This book was first published in 1984 by Routledge. -- Research Interests: Ethics, Political Theory, Continental Philosophy, Max Weber (Philosophy), Social and Political Philosophy, and Max Weber
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Weber  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  positivism  rationality  values  fact-value  constructivism  pragmatism  German_scholarship  German_historical_school  hermeneutics  Heidegger  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Far from a Nihilistic Crowd: The Theoretical Contribution of Radical Subjectivist Austrian Economics ( Review of Austrian Economics, 2011, vol. 24: 185-98) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This paper compares and contrasts the hermeneutic turn advocated by Don Lavoie in this 1985 essay on "The Interpretive Dimension of Economics" with the ontological turn that was gathering momentum amongst other groups of heterodox economists at about the same time. It is argued that an explicit focus on ontological issues can complement and support the ‘interpretive turn’, most notably by helping to show that the charge of nihilism that are sometimes levelled against Lavoie and his followers is unwarranted. The argument is illustrated by a case study of one of the inspirations of, and contributors to, Lavoie’s project, namely Ludwig Lachmann. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: Austrian economics, hermeneutics, social order, nihilism, social ontology, emergence, Ludwig Lachmann, Don Lavoie. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_sociology  social_theory  economic_theory  hermeneutics  social_order  ontology-social  emergence  Austrian_economics  heterodox_economics  critical_realism  nihilism  intellectual_history  20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jason M. Wirth, Seattle University, review - Dalia Nassar (ed.), The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 23, 2014
Dalia Nassar's assemblage of engaging and significant essays on some of the resurgent philosophers of early German romanticism emphasizes their contemporary philosophical relevance. "For it is a specifically philosophical revival, motivated by philosophical questions". Nassar demarcates this relevance into four general kinds. In the first part of the book, consisting of a fascinating debate between two of the heaviest hitters in this revival, Manfred Frank and Frederick Beiser, the question revolves around the very identity of early German philosophical romanticism. What counts as a work of this kind? What makes these works significantly different from works by practitioners of German idealism? Or can the two areas be so clearly distinguished? The next three sections are less global in their ambitions, but all of them touch on important facets of this period's enduring philosophical provocation. The second section features essays on the question of culture, language, sociability, and education, while the third turns to matters aesthetic, and the fourth and concluding section takes up the question of science.
books  reviews  find  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Kant  Hegel  Schelling  Schleiermacher  Fichte  Novalis  Hölderin  metaphysics  epistemology  mind  nature  aesthetics  culture  cultural_history  subjectivity  Absolute  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  hermeneutics  history_of_science  sociability  education  bildung  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist - Vincent Descombes, The Institutions of Meaning: A Defense of Anthropological Holism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2014
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist, University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne This is the English translation by Stephen Adam Schwartz of Vincent Descombes’ Les Institutions du Sens (Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1996). It is the sequel to The Mind’s Provisions: A Critique of Cognitivism, also translated into English by Schwartz (Princeton University Press, 2001; French original version: La Denrée Mentale, Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1995). The two books should be considered together as a whole, to which the author himself gave the title of The Disputes of Mind. -- This impressive work is indeed a major contribution to the philosophy of mind. Perhaps the cognitivist wave is not as powerful today as it was twenty years ago, which may render the ‘dispute’ less intense nowadays, but the concept of mind provided by the author is no less topical. --. It is clear that this book is a milestone in the contemporary philosophy of mind and should absolutely be read by every philosopher or scientist interested in the nature of the mind today. It pursues an intense debate with contemporary cognitivism and with Continental theories and ‘deconstruction’ of mind, and develops a totally unique perspective at the crossroads of the Analytic and French traditions. Maybe, like every polemical work, it depends a bit too much on what it criticizes. However, beyond the polemic, it seems to me that this book does indeed promise a new philosophy of mind that defines the mind by itself and no longer by any transcendent principle — either ‘the Subject’ or ‘Society’ — that in a sense would not already be mindful. Thus, it seems to me that we should read this book as a plea for the non-metaphysical irreducibility of the mind. And what do we need more today than a non-metaphysical (I have not said: anti-metaphysical) anti-reductionism?
books  reviews  philosophy_of_language  mind  sociability  structuralist  poststructuralist  continental_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  phenomenology  hermeneutics  subjectivity  deconstruction  Peirce  logic  society  constructivism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 7 (Essays and Notes on St. Paul’s Epistles) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Published posthumously -- preface on hermeneutics, not just biblical, and principles of interpreting texts from another era, context -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  religious_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  Locke-religion  Biblical_exegesis  hermeneutics  New_Testament  Paul 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Joseph Mootz - Hermeneutics and Law (June 30, 2014) in The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics (Eds. Naill Keane and Chris Lawn, 2015) :: SSRN
University of the Pacific - McGeorge School of Law -- This chapter will appear in a forthcoming book on hermeneutics. After providing a hermeneutical phenomenology of legal practice that locates legal interpretation at the center of the rule of law, the chapter considers three important hermeneutical themes: (1) the critical distinction between a legal historian writing aboout a law in the past and a judge deciding a case according to the law; (2) the reinvigoration of the natural law tradition against the reductive characteristics of legal positivism by construing human nature as hermeneutical; and. (3) the role of philosophical hermeneutics in grounding critical legal theory rather than serving as a quiescent acceptance of the status quo, as elaborated by reconsidering the famous exchanges between Gadamer, Ricoeur and Habermas. -- I argue that these three important themes are sufficient to underwrite Gadamer's famous assertion that legal practice has exemplary status for hermeneutical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  historiography  lit_crit  critical_theory  legal_reasoning  judiciary  precedent  hermeneutics  natural_law  positivism-legal  legal_realism  rhetoric-writing  human_nature  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  Gadamer  Habermas  Ricoeur  Heidegger  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Ward - Helping the Dead Speak: Leo Strauss, Quentin Skinner and the Arts of Interpretation in Political Thought | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-255
In the wake of the "hermeneutical turn" two approaches to textual interpretation have come to wield considerable disciplinary influence in North American political theory circles: those of Leo Strauss and Quentin Skinner. Their respective approaches to texts in the history of political thought are generally regarded as competitor endeavors; indeed, the view that these approaches are downright antithetical enjoys the status of a disciplinary commonplace. I interrogate this commonplace and attempt to clarify what exactly is at stake in the differences between these two thinkers' interpretative approaches. Such efforts are repaid, I believe, by a more nuanced methodological self-awareness that discloses a more cooperative, and less antagonistic, view of the relationship between the two thinkers' hermeneutical understandings. -- check bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  Skinner  Strauss  Cambridge_School  Straussians  hermeneutics  Gadamer  concepts  concepts-change  meaning  philosophy_of_language  rhetoric  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Two-Way Translation: The Ethics of Engaging with Religious Contributions in Public Deliberation (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-84 -- Using as an exemplar, the 2007 "Evangelical Declaration against Torture," this paper examines the role of religious argument in public life. -- It argues for an absolute ban on the use of torture deploying unashamedly Christian rhetoric, some of it quite powerful and challenging. -- The present paper considers whether there is any affront to the duties of political civility in arguing in these terms. There is a line of argument, associated with John Rawls's book, "Political Liberalism," suggesting that citizens should refrain from discussing issues of public policy in religious or deep-philosophical terms that are not accessible to other citizens. The present paper challenges the conception of inaccessibility on which this Rawlsian position is based. It argues, with Jurgen Habermas, that all sides in a modern pluralist society have a right to state their views as firmly and as deeply as they can, and all sides have the duty to engage with others, and to strain as well as they can to grasp others' meanings. It is not enough to simply announce that one can not understand religious reasons, especially if no good faith effort has been made, using the ample resources available in our culture, to try. Of course, many peoeple will not be convinced by the reasons that are offered in religious discourse; but to argue for their rejection - which is always what may happen in respectable political deliberation - is not to say that the presentation of those reasons was offensive or inappropriate. (This paper was originally presented as the 2010 Meador Lecture at the University of Virginia Law School). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Absolute Principles, Pluralism, Public Reason, Rawls, Religious Reasons, Torture
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  public_sphere  political_discourse  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  political_culture  pluralism  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  Habermas  communication  community  deliberation-public  torture  civic_virtue  civility-political  respect  hermeneutics  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - H.L.A. Hart and the Hermeneutic Turn in Legal Theory :: SSRN - Southern Methodist University Law Review, Vol. 52, pp. 167-199, 1999
Modern legal positivism developed in response to a belief in the possibility and the value of having a quasi-scientific descriptive theory of law. In recent decades, legal positivism has moved in a different direction, due to the influence of H.L.A. Hart's work, which introduced hermeneutic elements into legal positivism. This article examines the hermeneutic turn in legal theory, and its implication for legal positivism in particular, and analytical jurisprudence in general. Some critics have argued that the hermeneutic element introduced by Hart undermines the possibility of having a purely descriptive theory of law, or even that it undermines the ability of theorists to criticize the legal systems they are studying. These possibilities are considered, in the course of evaluating the views of Joseph Raz, John Finnis, Stephen Perry, H. Hamner Hill, and others. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  20thC  positivism-legal  hermeneutics  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_law  Hart  Raz  natural_law  moral_philosophy  legal_system  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott, Hugh Ross Mackintosh, eds. - Selections from the Literature of Theism (1904 - 472 pgs) - Google Books
Thomas Aquinas *--* Descartes *--* Spinoza *--* The Cambridge Platonists *--* Berkeley *--* Kant *--* Schleiermacher *--* Cousin *--* Comte *--* Mansel *--* Lotze *--* Martineau *--* Janet *--* Ritschl -- each author introduced by brief essay but more interesting intellectual framework of the editors comes out in their footnotes -- not exactly a companion to Caldecott history of British and American philosophy of religion, since his history covers a large number of thinkers and doesn't include Continental except as needed to explain the Anglo-American authors, but still useful for the intellectual framework of increasingly confident academic approach to philosophy of religion as distinct from theology -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  19thC  Descartes  Spinoza  Spinozism  Cambridge_Platonists  Berkeley  Kant  Schleiermacher  Comte  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Hegelian  hermeneutics  moral_philosophy  cosmology  materialism  mind-body  metaphysics  God-attributes  God-existence  realism  scepticism  intuitionism  sociology_of_religion  phenomenology  Fin-de-Siècle  modernity  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis J. Mootz III, review - Donatella Di Cesare, Gadamer: A Philosophical Portrait // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
Donatella Di Cesare has written a wonderfully self-reflexive book. What does it mean to claim to have created a portrait of Hans-Georg Gadamer as a philosopher, given that Gadamer regarded the experience of art, and particularly the experience of viewing a portrait, as having profound significance for hermeneutical philosophy? Gadamer emphasized that the portrait necessarily moves beyond pure representation because the meaning of the subject of the portrait is augmented through the play that occurs while viewing the portrait. Di Cesare’s portrait of Gadamer succeeds because it exemplifies, amplifies and exceeds our previous understanding of Gadamer, working from the readers' starting points and stimulating them with new insights. The emerging portrait is at once challenging and provocative; of course, Gadamer would argue that a portrait should be nothing less.
books  reviews  Gadamer  Heidegger  hermeneutics  philosophy_of_language  Socrates 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Rush, review essay - Michael Forster, After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, AND German Philosophy of Language: From Schlegel to Hegel and Beyond // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // 2011
Michael Forster, After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, Oxford University Press, 2010, 482pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199228119. -**- Michael Forster, German Philosophy of Language: From Schlegel to Hegel and Beyond, Oxford University Press, 2011, 350pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199604814. -**- Reviewed by Fred Rush, University of Notre Dame
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Germany  philosophy_of_language  German_Idealism  idealism-transcendental  hermeneutics  anthropology  cognition  translation  Herder  Hamann  Kant  Schleiermacher  Dilthey  Schlegel  Hegel  rationalist  empiricism  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Keith Topper - In Defense of Disunity: Pragmatism, Hermeneutics, and the Social Sciences | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 509-539
Opposes Rorty claim of unity of method of inquiry for both natural and social sciences, though Rorty also advocated diversity of objectives. Topper sees pragmatism and hermeneutics as congenial approaches for social sciences -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences  methodology  pragmatism  hermeneutics  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton on Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism | Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 243-55. Denis Dutton
Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism (Cambridge University Press, $39.95) is notable not only for its passion, but for the way it supplies a new take on familiar problems. -- Etlin, however, is an architectural historian, and it’s refreshing to come across a cultural warrior lobbing grenades from a different academic encampment. -- Etlin’s book is excessively ambitious in trying to attack poststructuralism from dozens of angles; this, however, is part of its charm. He is bravely willing to take on anyone — Hayden White, Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Bourdieu, de Man, Norman Bryson, Freud — and has no hesitation in identifying heroes and heroines, from Rembrandt to Jane Austen to Jefferson to Victor Hugo to Frank Lloyd Wright. -- Etlin says that not since Hegel have intellectuals displayed the hubris they show today, “attributing to themselves the power to arbitrate all meaning.” Their celebration of complexity and ambiguity becomes a form of “boundless egotism.” Poststructuralists are as suckered by the notion that texts are hidden repositories of obscure meanings as previous generations of intellectuals were suckered by the forces of astrology or alchemy. But their feelings of power, freedom, and discovery are illusory. "....Claims about variety, endless or even limited, can never be merely asserted; they must be demonstrated with coherent solutions.” -- Etlin’s brief but incisive treatment of Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” is quite typical of the provocations of his book, making me wonder why this essay is continuously reproduced, forced on students, and cited in articles. Benjamin’s so-called pathbreaking discourse is wrong on virtually all major counts, as Etlin shows.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  lit_crit  humanism  anti-humanism  19thC  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  social_theory  literary_theory  historiography-postWWII  epistemology-history  complexity  diversity  hermeneutics  deconstruction  narrative  aesthetics  mass_culture  Benjamin  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation | Philosophy and Literature 16 (1992): 432-37
Delightful Denis Dutton review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge University Press, $39.95 hardbound, $11.95 paper) -- presents three lectures by Umberto Eco, with responses by Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler, and Christine Brooke-Rose, a final rejoinder by Eco, and a general introduction by Stefan Collini. The occasion was the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures, and they apparently packed out one of the biggest auditoriums at Cambridge University in 1990. There was more debate, including Frank Kermode, Malcolm Bradbury, and David Lodge, than is included here, and one imagines it was an exciting occasion. -- quite splendid description of debate between Eco and Rorty. Culler who is more open ended than Eco on limits to interpretation turns his guns on the self described American pragmatists, Rorty and Stanley Fish. Needless to say Dutton is reluctant to put Rorty in the same tradition as Dewey - Eco's voracious curiosity and wonder about the world is more in Dewey’s line - and is appalled at labeling Fish a pragmatist. Definitely to buy.
books  reviews  find  amazon.com  lit_crit  literary_theory  hermeneutics  hermeticism  gnostic  interpretivism  deconstruction  reader_response  intentionality  Eco  Rorty  pragmatism 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review essay - Historicizing Nietzsche? Paradoxes and Lessons of a Hard Case | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 114-152
Reviewed works: *--* (1) Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Politicial Thought by Keith Ansell-Pearson; *--* (2) The Neitzche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 by Steven E. Aschheim; *--* (3) Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche by Ernst Behler; *--* (4) Neitzsche on Truth and Philosophy by Steven Taubeneck; *--* (5) Nietzsche Contra Nietzsche: Creativity and the Anti-Romantic by Adrian Del Caro; *--* (6) Neitzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism by Bruce Detwiler; *--* (7) Nietzsche's New Seas: Explorations in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Politics by Michael Allen Gillespie; Tracy B. Strong; *--* (8) Nietzsche and the Origin of Virtue by Lester H. Hunt; *--* (9) Zarathustras Geheimnis: Friedrich Nietzsche und seine verschlüsselte Botschaft by Joachim Köhler; *--* (10) Nietzsche as Postmodernist: Essays Pro and Contra; Clayton Koelb; *--* (11) Nietzsche's Case: Philosophy as/and Literature by Bernd Magnus; Stanley Stewart; Jean-Pierre Mileur; *--* (12) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology by Alistair Moles; *--* (13) Nietzsche und der Nietzscheanismus by Ernst Nolte; *--* (14) Young Nietzsche: Becoming a Genius by Carl Pletsch; *--* (15) Nietzsche and the Question of Interpretation: Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction by Alan D. Schrift; *--* (16) Alcyone: Nietzsche on Gifts, Noise, and Women by Gary Shapiro; *-'* (17) Nietzschean Narratives by Gary Shapiro; *--* (18) Thinker on Stage: Nietzsche's Materialism by Peter Sloterdijk; *--* (19) Reading Nietzsche by Robert C. Solomon; Kathleen M. Higgins; *--* (20) Nietzsche's Voice by Henry Staten; *--* (21) Left-Wing Nietzscheanism: The Politics of German Expressionism, 1910-1920 by Seth Taylor; *--* (22) Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of the Soul: A Study of Heroic Individualism by Leslie Paul Thiele; *--* (23) Nietzsche and Political Thought by Mark Warren; *--* (24) Within Nietzsche's Labyrinth by Alan White; *--* (25) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art by Julian Young -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Rousseau  Heidegger  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  morality-Nietzche  lit_crit  literary_history  individualism  self  self-development  Weimar  hermeneutics  deconstruction  postmodern  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  metaethics  style-philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History [forum re Bevir's Logic] | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2, May, 2002
This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails. -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  philosophy_of_history  historiography  philosophy_of_social_science  historicism  intentionality  hermeneutics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Historical Understanding and the Human Sciences [eScholarship] (2007)
Looks like this is the introductory article for a 2007 issue of the Journal of the Philosophy of History in which Bevir also contributed a separate article (on national histories? ) Starts with verstehen and then puts it into post-positivist context. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  verstehen  interpretivism  hermeneutics  postanalytic_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Bevir, Mark, and Kedar, Asaf - Concept Formation in Political Science: An Anti-Naturalist Critique of Qualitative Methodology [eScholarship] (2008)
Looks like a working paper by Bevir with PhD candidate - paper presented in 2006. The "naturalism" they criticize appears to reify social science concepts and doesn't have a place for anti-foundationalism "web of meaning" interpretation. Still not sure how this differs from hermeneutics other than perhaps not so focused on phenomenology or various versions of verstehen. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  eScholarship  philosophy_of_social_science  naturalism  anti-foundationalism  interpretivism  hermeneutics 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Anti-foundationalism [eScholarship] (2009)
Original Citation:
“Anti-foundationalism”, in M. Flinders, A. Gamble, C. Hay, and M. Kenny, eds., The Oxford Handbook of British Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 115-137.

Keywords:
Anti-foundationalism, Interpretivism, British Politics, PostMarxism, Governmentality
article  eScholarship  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_language  epistemology-social  epistemology-history  anti-foundationalism  governmentality  holism  interpretivism  hermeneutics  post-Marxism  British_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - How to Be an Intentionalist | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 209-217
See Brown article in same issue - The general aim of this paper is to establish the plausibility of a postfoundational intentionalism. Its specific aim is to respond to criticisms of my work made by Vivienne Brown in a paper "On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History." Postfoundationalism is often associated with a new textualism according to which there is no outside to the text. In contrast, I suggest that postfoundationalists can legitimate our postulating intentions, actions, and other historical objects outside of the text. They can do so by reference to, first, philosophical commitments to general classes of objects, and, second, inference to the best explanation with respect to particular objects belonging to such classes. This postfoundational intentionalism sets up a suitable context within which to address Brown's more specific questions.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  author_intention  reader_response  intertextual  Derrida  postmodern  hermeneutics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 198-208
See response from Bevir - This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  author_untention  reader_response  hermeneutics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tracy B. Strong - How to Write Scripture: Words, Authority, and Politics in Thomas Hobbes | JSTOR: Critical Inquiry, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 128-159
See re Pettit and Skinner treatment of Hobbes, rhetoric and "constructivist" approach to social and political reality, sovereignty, authority erc -- downloaded pdf to Note -- followed up with comment be Victoria Silver and response
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_belief  Biblical_authority  rhetoric-political  hermeneutics  authority  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political-theology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Sabia - Defending Immanent Critique | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 5 (October 2010), pp. 684-711
This article develops, illustrates, and defends a conception of immanent critique. Immanent critique is construed as a form of hermeneutical practice and second-order political and normative criticism. The common charge that immanent critique is a form of philosophical conventionalism necessarily committed to value relativism and to the rejection of transcultural and cosmopolitan norms is denied. But immanent critique insists that meaningful and potentially efficacious criticism must be connected to relevant criteria and understandings internal to the culture or social order at which the criticism is directed. The complaint that this demand will likely limit political and moral criticism is also denied, and the ability of immanent critique to develop from convention unconventional thinking is defended and demonstrated. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  political_history  political_philosophy  change-social  hermeneutics  relativism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Nirenberg's Anti-Judaism, Reviewed: Anthony Grafton - Imaginary Jews: The strange history of antisemitism in Western culture | New Republic Oct 2013
For David Nirenberg—whose Anti-Judaism is one of the saddest stories, and one of the most learned, I have ever read—Jewel, and Jerome and Augustine are typical figures from an enormous tapestry. From antiquity to more recent times, an endless series of writers and thinkers have crafted versions and visions of Jews and Judaism that are as ugly and frightening as they are effective.
books  reviews  religious_history  religious_culture  Early_Christian  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  Judaism  Christianity  Old_Testament  Augustine  theology  chosen_people  hermeneutics  New_Testament  Biblical_criticism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Hipolito  : Coleridge, Hermeneutics, and the Ends of Metaphysic (2004) | T & F Online
European Romantic Review, Volume 15, Issue 4, 2004, pages 547- 565, Available online: 17 Aug 2006DOI: 10.1080/1050958042000312027 -- paywall -- starts with discussion that Schleiermacher more influenced by Spinoza and the Pantheism fight than Gadamer acknowledges, as he puts Schleiermacher extending Biblical_criticism to the broader hermeneutics of understanding
article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Spinoza  pantheism  monism  Kant  German_Idealism  Schleiermacher  hermeneutics  metaphysics  Coleridge  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Yvonne Sherratt: 9780521670982: (CUP 2006)
Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes contemporary developments within strands of thought stemming back to Ancient Greece and Rome.

Anthony Pagden recommends re Enlightenment Project
books  intellectual_history  social_theory  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_philosophy  19thC  20thC  Germany  France  Nietzsche  hermeneutics  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  postmodern  Foucault  Habermas 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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