dunnettreader + germany   210

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Gierke (Maitland trans) - Political Theories of the Middle Ages - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 9/14/2017. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- downloaded via Air to Dbox - in "ebooks to file"
downloaded  books  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  political_philosophy  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice - review by Christopher Yeomans | NDPR - June 2017
Terry Pinkard
Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice

Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice, Harvard University Press, 2017, 272pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674971776.
Reviewed by Christopher Yeomans, Purdue University
books  reviews  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  Hegel  19thC  Germany  German_Idealism 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Acemoglu, Cantoni, Johnson
The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution
Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson and James A. Robinson
The American Economic Review
Vol. 101, No. 7 (DECEMBER 2011), pp. 3286-3307
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
commerce  urbanization  guilds  elites  republicanism  reform-legal  Rhineland  reform-political  Germany  economic_growth  political_economy  reform-economic  jstor  political_history  civil_code  French_Revolution  rule_of_law  institutional_economics  bourgeoisie  aristocracy  trade  article  downloaded  feudalism  economic_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Auswärtiges Amt - Federal Foreign Office - Holding Europe together (post Brexit)
Holding Europe together Commenting today (24 June) on the result of the EU referendum in the UK, Foreign Minister Steinmeier said “we must not allow ourselves…
Instapaper  Brexit  EU_governance  Germany  from instapaper
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin D. Crowe - Dilthey's Philosophy of Religion in the "Critique of Historical Reason": 1880-1910 (2005) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 66, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 265-283 -- The core of Dilthey's philosophy of religion during the period here under consideration is what I call the "immanence thesis," which is a "hermeneutical hypothesis" that Dilthey employs in interpreting various phenomena of religious life. The claim is that the subject matter and source of religion is human life rather than a transcendent reality beyond the bounds of human experience. Put another way Dilthey's view is that religious myths, symbols, concepts, and practices are all ways of articulating the immanent meaning or sense of histori-cal life. This thesis grounds the positive role that religious experience and the history of Christianity play in Dilthey's project in the Einleitung, i.e., the grounding of the human sciences in what he later called a "whole, full, and unmutilated" picture of human life. The "immanence thesis" also provides clues regarding Dilthey's own religious position, which, though certainly not Christian (or even theistic) "in the specific sense," nonetheless bears affinities with Romantic pantheism as well as with the "world-view" that Dilthey later calls "objective idealism." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography-19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Dilthey  religious_belief  religious_practices  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_history  sociology_of_religion  German_historical_school  19thC  immanence  transcendence  theism  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Porter and Teisch eds. - The Enlightenment in National Context (1981) | Cambridge University Press
Table of Contents

Preface
1. The Enlightenment in England Roy Porter
2. The Scottish Enlightenment Nicholas Phillipson
3. The Enlightenment in France Norman Hampson
4. The Enlightenment in the Netherlands Simon Schama
5. The Enlightenment in Switzerland Samuel S. B. Taylor
6. The Italian Enlightenment Owen Chadwick
7. The Protestant Enlightenment in Germany Joachim Whaley
8. The Enlightenment in Catholic Germany T. C. W. Blanning
9. Reform Catholicism and political radicalism in the Austrian Enlightenment Ernst Wangermann
10. Bohemia: from darkness into light Mikuláš Teich
11. The Enlightenment in Sweden Tore Frängsmyr
12. The Russian Enlightenment Paul Dukes
13. Enlightenment and the politics of American nature J. R. Pole
Afterword Mikuláš Teich
Excerpt 10 pgs of Porter re England - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Italy  England  Sweden  Austria  Germany  Counter-Enlightenment  Protestants  Radical_Enlightenment  church_history  Protestant_International  cultural_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  reform-political  political_culture  Counter-Reformation  downloaded  French_Enlightenment  Russia  Papacy  British_history  Dutch  18thC  Roman_Catholicism  books  Enlightenment  Prussia  intellectual_history 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Leonid Bershidsky - Germany's Middle Class Is Endangered, Too - Bloomberg View - May 2016
Manufacturing jobs. Photographer: Sean Gallup/Getty Images Print Europe Leonid Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. He is a Berlin-based writer, author of…
Instapaper  Labor_markets  labor  middle_class  Germany  job_security  wages  precariat  hollowing_out  manufacturing  OECD_economies  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Reading Hegel: The Introductions - open access book (2008) | re-press,org
Editors’ Introduction: The Circle of Knowledge
Chapter 1: Phenomenology of Spirit
Chapter 2: Science of Logic
Chapter 3: Philosophy of Right
Chapter 4: Philosophy of History
Chapter 5: Philosophy of Fine Art
Chapter 6: Philosophy of Religion
Chapter 7: History of Philosophy
Editors’ Epilogue: The End of Introductions
Further Readings
Index
Hegel-philosophy_of_right  19thC  Hegel-aesthetics  books  Germany  philosophy_of_history  open_access  ontology  Kant  Absolute_idealism  Hegel-logic  Hegel  etexts  downloaded  German_Idealism  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_science 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Seminar 1 of 6 - Hegel's Origination of Property, the Family and the State (2013) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
German Philosophy Seminars - Hegel's Origination of Property, the Family and the State. Texts and Critique
Seminar 1: General Introduction: Hegel's Metaphysics, and the Place of the Family in Hegel's Philosophy of 'Geist'
Each seminar will begin with an introductory commentary, and be followed by a close reading of a short text. Texts will be provided in German and English in PDF format, and will normally be a maximum of 15 pages (often much shorter), chosen from: the Logik of 1832; System der Sittlichkeit (System of Ethical Life); sections of the third of the Jenaer Systementwürfe; the Phänomenologie des Geistes; and the Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts (Elements of the Philosophy of Right). Knowledge of German is not essential to attend the seminars, but texts and key terms will be discussed in German and English.
Schedule downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
family  women  intellectual_history  family_law  courses  political_philosophy  19thC  property_rights  German_Idealism  video  Hegel  property  social_theory  Germany 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Laurent Jalabert - La politique territoriale française sur la rive gauche du Rhin (1679-1697) : des « réunions » à la Province de la Sarre (2011) Revue Historique - Cairn.info
Les entreprises dites de réunion de la monarchie française sous Louis XIV ont concerné les frontières du grand quart nord-est du royaume (Franche-Comté, Alsace, Lorraine). Au-delà de la démonstration de la puissance du roi, l’un des principaux objectifs était de parfaire la sécurisation de ce vaste espace. De fait, les réunions ont mis à mal des terres d’empire avec entre autres la création de la province de la Sarre, peu peuplée mais importante stratégiquement. Au contraire de la province d’Alsace, celle de la Sarre ne franchit pas vraiment le palier de l’intendance militaire ; pourtant, malgré son caractère éphémère, la mise en place de cette nouvelle province a favorisé la réimplantation du catholicisme entre la Sarre et la Queich. -- paywall
17thC  HRE  confessionalization  military_history  religious_history  France  Protestant_International  Louis_XIV  Germany  paywall  Catholics-France  article  religious_wars 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Sara Eigen Figal - When Brothers Are Enemies: Frederick the Great's Catechism for War (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 21-36 -- This article argues that the rhetoric of "brotherhood" in military writing of the German 18thC offers a nuanced perspective on the intertwined nature of amity and enmity during an era more often associated with calls for "perpetual peace" and a rationalized end of violence. Focusing on a little-known "catechism" for young officers written by Frederick II ("the Great") of Prussia, the essay interrogates the use of Enlightenment rhetoric of brotherhood not only to theorize peace, but also to illuminate questions about the inevitability of war and the possible channeling of hostility to mitigate its destructive force. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  military_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  perpetual_peace  violence  civil_wars  société_des_princes  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Prussia  international_law  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - The First Historian of Human Rights (2011) | JSTOR - The American Historical Review
Vol. 116, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 58-79 -- Revisiting Ritter's story of the invention of human rights—as perverse as it was pioneering—affords critical distance from what has become a central historiographical fashion. It is precisely because his narrative constructs the past of human rights for so unfamiliar a project that Ritter provides a more vivid reminder of how easy it still is to devise a field with the goal of crafting a usable past for new imperatives. The deep past out of which human rights are supposed to have sprung provides rich but manipulable material for such enterprises. Ritter's first history is also a salutary reminder of the meanings that the concept of human rights accreted in the postwar era, when they transcended the nation‐state and began to be called in English by their current name. The 1940s, when Ritter wrote, are often forced to play the role of precursor in contemporary narratives—as a kind of failed early version of the post–Cold War 1990s, when human rights as a movement and a framework became visible enough to motivate historians to work on them. Given the Universal Declaration, the chronological focus on the 1940s is understandable. But Ritter provides an inadvertent warning against omitting the conservative and religious sources of human rights in that era, and therefore interpreting it anachronistically. His case powerfully buttresses emerging skepticism about the whole notion of rooting contemporary human rights in the 1940s, let alone earlier, given more recent transformations in the very meaning of the concept, and the unprecedented explosion of a movement based on them. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Cold_War  IR-realism  IR  religious_history  Christianity  Christian_Democracy  human_rights  anti-capitalism  anti-materialism  communitarian  anti-individualism  international_law  usable_past  historiography-postWWII  United_Nations  post-war_reconstruction  Germany  Europe  theology  rights-legal  conservatism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadeem J. Z. Hussain and Lydia Patton - Friedrich Albert Lange | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy August 2012 revision of original May 2095
Friedrich Albert Lange (b. 1828, d. 1875) was a German philosopher, pedagogue, political activist, and journalist. He was one of the originators of neo-Kantianism and an important figure in the founding of the Marburg school of neo-Kantianism. He also played a significant role in the German labour movement and in the development of social democratic thought. His book, The History of Materialism, was a standard introduction to materialism and the history of philosophy well into the twentieth century. -- 1. Life and Intellectual Career -- 2. Pedagogy -- 3. The Labor Question -- 4. Neo-Kantianism ** 4.1 The Ethical Standpoint of the Ideal ** 4.2 Logic and Scientific Methodology -- downloaded as pdf to Note
intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Lange_FA  neo-Kantian  Hegelian  German_Idealism  materialism-19thC  materialism  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  ancient_philosophy  atomism  logic  scientific_method  socialism  labor  capitalism  Industrial_Revolution  social_democracy  physiology  mind  perception  sensation  Kant-ethics  bibliography 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Enlightenment Underground: Radical Germany, 1680-1720, trans., H. C. Erik Midelfort (2015) | Amazon.com
Martin Mulsow’s seismic reinterpretation of the origins of the Enlightenment in Germany won awards and renown in its original German edition, and now H. C. Erik Midelfort's translation makes this sensational book available to English-speaking readers. Mulsow shows that even in the late17thC some thinkers in Germany ventured to express extremely dangerous ideas, but did so as part of a secret underground. Scouring manuscript collections across northern Europe, Mulsow studied the writings of countless hitherto unknown radical jurists, theologians, historians, and dissident students who pushed for the secularization of legal, political, social, and religious knowledge. Often their works circulated in manuscript, anonymously, or as clandestinely published books. Working as a philosophical microhistorian, Mulsow has discovered the identities of several covert radicals and linked them to circles of young German scholars, many of whom were connected with the vibrant radical cultures of the Netherlands, England, and Denmark. The author reveals how radical ideas and contributions to intellectual doubt came from Socinians and Jews, church historians and biblical scholars, political theorists, and unemployed university students. He shows that misreadings of humorous or ironic works sometimes gave rise to unintended skeptical thoughts or corrosively political interpretations of Christianity. This landmark book overturns stereotypical views of the early Enlightenment in Germany as cautious, conservative, and moderate, and replaces them with a new portrait that reveals a movement far more radical, unintended, and puzzling than previously suspected. -- November release date
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Germany  Republic_of_Letters  Socinians  political_philosophy  Biblical_criticism  secularization  heterodoxy  historiography  microhistory  publishing-clandestine  scepticism  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  circulation-ideas 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Timothy W. Guinnane -A pragmatic approach to external debt: The write-down of Germany’s debts in 1953 | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal -13 August 2015
Greece’s crisis has invited comparisons to the 1953 London Debt Agreement, which ended a long period of German default on external debt. This column suggests that looking back, the 1953 agreement was unnecessarily generous given that Germany’s rapid growth lightened the debt repayment burden. Unfortunately for Greece, the motivations driving the 1953 agreement are nearly entirely absent today. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  sovereign_debt  default  20thC  post-WWII  Germany  international_political_economy  international_finance  international_monetary_system  Greece-Troika  creditors  EU_governance  IMF  international_organizations  structural_adjustment  austerity  economic_growth  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Hugh McLeod, Werner Ustorf, eds. - The Decline of Christendom in Western Europe, 1750–2000 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
EDITORS: Hugh McLeod, University of Birmingham and Werner Ustorf, University of Birmingham -- 1. Introduction, Hugh McLeod *--* 2. The secularisation decade: what the 1960s have done to the study of religious history, Callum G. Brown *--* 3. Christendom in decline: the Swedish case, Eva M. Hamberg *--* 4. New Christianity: indifference and diffused spirituality, Yves Lambert *--* 5. Established churches and the growth of religious pluralism: a case study of Christianisation and secularisation in England since 1700, David Hempton *--* 6. Catholicism in Ireland, Sheridan Gilley *--* 7. Long-term religious developments in the Netherlands, c. 1750–2000, Peter Van Rooden *--* 8. The potency of 'Christendom': The example of the 'Darmstädter Wort' (1947), Martin Greschat. *--* 9. The dechristianisation of death in modern France, Thomas Kselman *--* 10. The impact of technology on Catholicism in France (1850–1950), Michel Lagrée *--* 11. Semantic structures of religious change in modern Germany, Lucian Hölscher *--* 12. Master-narratives of long-term religious change, Jeffery Cox *--* 13. A missiological postscript Werner Ustorf.
books  kindle-available  religious_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  Christianity  Christendom  religious_culture  religious_belief  religion-established  Europe  Europe-19thC  Enlightenment  secularization  Catholics-English  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  pluralism  Germany  France  anticlerical  spirituality 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin E. Marty - The birth of a book « The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  20thC  21stC  religious_lit  readership  reader_response  Germany  German_theologians  spirituality  Nazis  WWII  religious_experience  religious_culture  contextualism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLomg - German Economic Thought and the European Crisis - Washington Center for Equitable Growth - July 2017
It is a commonplace among Anglo-Saxon economists that Saxon-Saxon “ordoliberalism” was a post-World War II success only because somebody else–the United… DeLong remarks on his link to the article on why the European Crisis was inevitable given German economic theory -- that the German economists have attributed the country's economic success to ordoliberalism and German virtue when it was based on an incredibly favorable environment and policy postures by the US as global hegemon. Instapaper
Instapaper  economic_history  Germany  international_monetary_system  global_economy  post-WWII  trade-policy  global_imbalance  hegemony  Marshall_Plan  sovereign_debt  export-led  Germany-Eurozone  ordoliberalism  Keynesianism  austerity  budget_deficit  FX  FX-misalignment  Greece-Troika  economic_theory  economic_culture  economic_policy  macroeconomics  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Where is the power? - Wojciech Przybylski, Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz A conversation with Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz - July 2015
Original in Polish -- Translation by Aleksandra Malecka
First published in Res Publica, Nowa 30 (2015) -- In Europe all political thought is imperialist, says Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz. This means that politics as we know it today incorporates the experience of imperial politics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, when the foundations of what we call "the political" were forged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
geopolitics  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  empires  state-building  nation-state  national_interest  EU  EU_governance  imperial-soft  Germany  Germany-Eurozone  Russia  Russian_foreign_policy  Poland  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  empire-and_business  globalization  sovereignty  hierarchy  authority  public_policy  policymaking  public_opinion  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Kwass, review essay - Reassessing Enlightenment Economics - Reinert's "Translating Empire" | Books & ideas - 25 March 2013
Reviewed: Sophus A. Reinert, Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Harvard University Press, 438 pp - Resurrecting the life of John Cary’s Essay on the State of England, a book which travelled all over Europe throughout the 18th century, S.A. Reinert challenges our understanding of Enlightenment economics, while calling for a more nuanced and historically-informed understanding of political economy in general. (..) By resurrecting the life of a text that scholars have dismissed as “mercantilist” and repositioning that work at the center of 18th-century political economy, Reinert challenges our basic understanding of Enlightenment economics, so often reduced to the free-trade doctrines of the physiocrats and Adam Smith. He argues that the diffusion of Cary’s work demonstrates that state-centered approaches to the creation of wealth enjoyed wide resonance at the very moment when discussions of economic policy were expanding beyond state chambers to engage a broader public. Far from being eclipsed by theories of laissez-faire economics, as conventional histories of economic thought would have us believe, such approaches became “the absolute mainstream in Europe” by the late 18th century -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle  18thC  economic_history  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  political_economy  Enlightenment  economic_theory  mercantilism  laisser-faire  Physiocrats  Smith  British_history  British_foreign_policy  nation-state  economic_growth  development  public_policy  public_goods  government-roles  Italy  Austria  Germany  readership  history_of_book  print_culture  information-intermediaries  networks-information  networks-business  networks-policy  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Pius XI, Mit Brennender Sorge (14/03/1937) - ENCYCLICAL ON THE CHURCH AND THE GERMAN REICH | Vatican
It is with deep anxiety and growing surprise that We have long been following the painful trials of the Church and the increasing vexations which afflict those who have remained loyal in heart and action in the midst of a people that once received from St. Boniface the bright message and the Gospel of Christ and God's Kingdom. And what the representatives of the venerable episcopate, who visited Us in Our sick room, had to tell Us, in truth and duty bound, has not modified Our feelings. To consoling and edifying information on the stand the Faithful are making for their Faith, they considered themselves bound, in spite of efforts to judge with moderation and in spite of their own patriotic love, to add reports of things hard and unpleasant. After hearing their account, We could, in grateful acknowledgment to God, exclaim with the Apostle of love: "I have no greater grace than this, to hear that my children walk in truth" (John iii. 4). But the frankness indifferent in Our Apostolic charge and the determination to place before the Christian world the truth in all its reality, prompt Us to add: "Our pastoral heart knows no deeper pain, no disappointment more bitter, than to learn that many are straying from the path of truth." -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  political_history  politics-and-religion  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  Catholics  Papacy  Nazis  Germany  church_history  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan, review essay on Edward Skidelsky and Tobias Bevc histories of the philosophy of Ernst Cassirer (March 2010) | H-Net Reviews - H-German
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan. Review of Bevc, Tobias, Kulturgenese als Dialektik von Mythos und Vernunft: Ernst Cassirer und die Kritische Theorie and Skidelsky, Edward, Ernst Cassirer: The Last Philosopher of Culture. H-German, H-Net Reviews. March, 2010. Skidelsky offers a welcome, broad introduction of Cassirer's work, but one that is problematic in its approach to broader issues of philosophy and politics. His more polemic claims, often asserted rather than argued, are unlikely to persuade specialists in intellectual history and may misguide general readers about the complex political contours of continental philosophy. Bevc, in contrast, offers a more focused and systematic comparison of Cassirer's philosophy and Critical Theory. His argument is generally compelling. He also skillfully draws a number of significant parallels that would seem to have been precluded by Adorno's dismissive comment, although Bevc does occasionally overstep in the case of the Frankfurt School. But perhaps this faux pas is fitting for a scholar whose efforts at intellectual and political conciliation were so recklessly dismissed in his own time and remain, as Skidelsky observes, foreign to our contentious age.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_culture  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  culture  symbol  symbols-religious  myth  reason  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  phenomenology  existentialism  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  human_nature  humanism  anti-humanism  culture_industries  irrationalism  rationalization-institutions  modernity  Marxist  continental_philosophy  neo-Kantian  Adorno 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Ralph Dumain: Essay: Critique of 'Dialectic of Enlightenment' (2003) | The Autodidact Project
Conclusion -- Now back to a general problem with this book, especially the chapters on the culture industry and anti-semitism: the attempts to tie all these otherwise valuable analyses to the Enlightenment do not work, except under the strained analogy with positivism that surfaces here and there. And as usual, the stray remarks on science and mathematics are all wrong. The most general inadequacy of the book is indicated in its title. The title is incomplete, for the dialectic as I see it is the dialectic of enlightenment and something else. Or perhaps the dialectic of the hidden contradictions in Enlightenment thinkers. But I don't see a true dialectical understanding of Enlightenment here. As I've said, in other works Horkheimer and Adorno show great perspicacity in their grasp of the positivism-lebensphilosophie dichotomy. As I understand Dialectic of Enlightenment so far, I believe they got it wrong. Irrationalism is blamed on the dark side of the Enlightenment, but I see it differently: rationalism and irrationalism coexist in a contradictory ideological and social totality. Enlightenment is only one half of the equation, not an appropriate label for the ideological dynamic as a whole. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
books  reviews  Enlightenment_Project  Adorno  cultural_critique  culture_industries  Germany  Enlightenment  anti-Semitism  Nazis  dialectic-historical  critical_theory  positivism  scientism  rationalization-institutions  reason  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Dietz Vollrath - All Institutions, All the Time? | The Growth Economics Blog - April 2015
Wolfgang Keller and Carol Shiue just released a working paper on “Market Integration as a Mechanism for Growth“. They are looking at growth in Germany during… Discusses a neat paper looking at parts of Germany that followed different patterns of economic development and growth in the 19thC, comparing cities based on (1) degree of market integration (measured by wheat prices) and (2) whether they transformed property relations from feudal to liberal, disbanded guilds, and adopted "equality before the rule of law". The second tended to reflect whether a city was conquered by Napoleon. He first looks at each variable and how the authors define it, what's likely involved in whether it's positive for a given city. He critiques some of their methodology, such as combining legal and socioeconomic indicators into a single weighted index. But his strongest critique is how the authors keep refining their analysis to make "institutional" factors appear highly significant, when the significance is unclear to put it charitably. And the biggest problem where they are likely to find significance, cities conquered by Napoleon, doesn't consider different types of causality that might have been involved, e.g. a city's situation geographically (which affected market integration) and degree of economic development might have been part of why Napoleon focused on those cities to conquer, from which he organized things like supply lines or transport for his armies. It's a continuation of his ongoing critique of what he sees as a fad for institutional explanations that don't actually demonstrate what they say they do -- let alone suggest how institutional development could be replicated. -- copied to Instapaper
economic_history  19thC  Germany  feudalism  capitalism  property_rights  guilds  urban_development  institutional_economics  market_integration  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Jennifer Pitts, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Perspectives on Politics, March 2013 on Isaac Nakhimovsky - Academia.edu
This book presents an important new account of Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Closed Commercial State, a major early nineteenth-century development of Rousseau and Kant's political thought. Isaac Nakhimovsky shows how Fichte reformulated Rousseau's constitutional politics and radicalized the economic implications of Kant's social contract theory with his defense of the right to work. Nakhimovsky argues that Fichte's sequel to Rousseau and Kant's writings on perpetual peace represents a pivotal moment in the intellectual history of the pacification of the West. Fichte claimed that Europe could not transform itself into a peaceful federation of constitutional republics unless economic life could be disentangled from the competitive dynamics of relations between states, and he asserted that this disentanglement required transitioning to a planned and largely self-sufficient national economy, made possible by a radical monetary policy. Fichte's ideas have resurfaced with nearly every crisis of globalization from the Napoleonic wars to the present, and his book remains a uniquely systematic and complete discussion of what John Maynard Keynes later termed "national self-sufficiency." Fichte's provocative contribution to the social contract tradition reminds us, Nakhimovsky concludes, that the combination of a liberal theory of the state with an open economy and international system is a much more contingent and precarious outcome than many recent theorists have tended to assume. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - Nov 2011
Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College -- Isaac Nakhimovsky has accomplished what I had thought to be impossible: he has made Fichte's The Closed Commercial State (1800) into an interesting text. By carefully situating this long-neglected work within its historical and philosophical context, Nakhimovsky enables us to see it as more than a misguided attempt by a major philosopher to address the political issues of his day by inventing a utopian vision of the free republic so obviously fantastic that it was widely dismissed as such by most of Fichte's own contemporaries. To his credit, Nakhimovsky does not deny the silliness of many of the details of that vision. What he shows, however, is the urgency -- and, more importantly, the continuing relevance -- of the central problem that Fichte's text attempts to solve: how to reconcile a Rousseauean ideal of free citizenship with the realities of modern "commercial" societies (marked, in Fichte's time, by a decline in agriculture in favor of industry and a rapidly increasing division of labor). Since the principal conflict here is the threat posed by international trade relations to the freedom and economic well-being of the citizens of republics enmeshed in those relations, it is not difficult (with Nakhimovsky's assistance) to see this seemingly most untimely of texts as addressing what is merely an earlier version of the same conflict that stands, even today, at the center of Europe's woes. One of the great strengths of Nakhimovsky's book is that it treats The Closed Commercial State as standing in a long line of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century texts that debate the implications for international peace of what we would call "globalized" commerce. (Kant's Perpetual Peace [1795] is the best known of these texts, it merely continues a much longer tradition that includes works by Fenélon, l'Abbé de Saint-Pierre, Rousseau, Sieyès, and many others.) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Isabelle Kalinowski, review essay - Max Weber and Capitalism’s Strange Rationality - Books & ideas - November 2014
translated by Michael C. Behrent -- Reviewed: (1) Michael Löwy, La Cage d’acier. Max Weber et le marxisme wébérien [The Iron Cage: Max Weber and Weberian Marxism], Stock, coll. "Un ordre d’idées", 2013, 200 p., 18€ -- (2) Michel Lallement, Tensions majeures. Max Weber, l’économie, l’érotisme [Major Tensions: Max Weber, Economics, Eroticism], Gallimard, 2013, 288 p., 19.90€. -- interesting discussion of his use of dichotomies that don't resolve into a dialectical synthesis -- also nice re how he uses the forces pushing toward rationalization of two interacting types, formal and substantive, that allows him to deploy it in many different cultures and eras, not just modernity -- Useful references to various pieces of his oeuvre in the footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  social_theory  Weber  modernity  modernity-emergence  capitalism  Marx  economic_history  economic_sociology  sociology_of_religion  sociology  dialectic-historical  19thC  20thC  Germany  rationalization-institutions  rationality-economics  rationality  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Carl Menger - Investigations into the Method of the Social Sciences - Books | Mises Institute
The famed Methodenstreit of the late 19th century was the battle of method. It pitted the emerging Austrian School against the German Historical School over a critically important question: what is the proper way to do social science? Here, Carl Menger, the founder of the School, vindicates the importance of theory, and lays the foundation for later developments by Mises and others. The book was written twelve years after his principles book, and it sought to deal with the hostility with which that book was greeted in the German world. Menger argues that economics can and must be more than an effort at observing, collecting, and assembling data. It can make general observations about the laws of economics that operate independently of time and place. -- No Austrian can overlook this very important treatise on method. This edition includes an introduction by Lawrence White that frames up the debate over method in light of modern trends in economic theory. -- This edition copyright NYU in 1960s and Mises Institute 2009 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  economic_theory  economic_sociology  social_theory  social_sciences  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  causation-social  covering_laws  Austrian_economics  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones (HBS Working Papers 2013) - Debating the Responsibility of Capitalism in Historical and Global Perspective
This working paper examines the evolution of concepts of the responsibility of business in a historical and global perspective. It shows that from the nineteenth century American, European, Japanese, Indian and other business leaders discussed the responsibilities of business beyond making profits, although until recently such views have not been mainstream. There was also a wide variation concerning the nature of this responsibility. This paper argues that four factors drove such beliefs: spirituality; self-interest; fears of government intervention; and the belief that governments were incapable of addressing major social issues.

Keywords: Rachel Carson; Sustainability; Local Food; Operations Management; Supply Chain; Business And Society; Business Ethics; Business History; Corporate Philanthropy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility And Impact; Environmentalism; Environmental Entrepreneurship; Environmental And Social Sustainability; Ethics; Globalization; History; Religion; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Energy Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Forest Products Industry; Green Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Asia; Europe; Latin America; Middle East; North and Central America; Africa
paper  downloaded  economic_history  business_history  imperialism  US  British_Empire  France  Germany  Japan  Spain  Dutch  Latin_America  Ottoman_Empire  India  18thC  19thC  20thC  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  business  busisness-ethics  business-and-politics  common_good  communitarian  environment  labor  patriarchy  paternalism  labor_standards  regulation  product_safety  inequality  comparative_economics  capital_as_power  capitalism  CSR  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_sociology  self-interest  ideology 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Merkel attacks wave of rightwing populism - FT.com Jan 2015
In a hard-hitting new year broadcast, Europe’s most powerful leader led the charge against Europe’s far-right parties, slamming the organisers of recent anti-Islam protests in Germany as having hearts “often full of prejudice, and even hate”. - also tough words for Putin, calling for EU cohesion against Russian aggression - bragging re her government's accomplishments & upbeat re Getmany's domestic situation, she's cashing in that credibility to go after the real threat, which is tight-wing extremism, leading up to ehat will be fifficult negotiations with the Greek left
EU  Eurozone  Germany  Merkel  right-wing  immigration  refugees  Russia  Ukraine  Greece  austerity  sovereign_debt 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Yogi Berra and the Dollar
great post on relation of exchange rates to interest rates, capital flows and economic growth
FX  Fed  interest_rates  US_economy  economic_growth  Germany  Eurozone  20thC  21stC  capital_flows  balance_of_payments 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Ross - The Naysayers: Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and the critique of pop culture | The New Yorker - September 15 2014
Benjamin, whose dizzyingly varied career skirted the edges of the Frankfurt collective, receives the grand treatment in “Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life” (Harvard), by Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings, who earlier edited Harvard’s four-volume edition of Benjamin’s writings. The Frankfurt School never presented a united front.... One zone in which they clashed was that of mass culture. Benjamin saw the popular arena as a potential site of resistance, from which left-leaning artists like Charlie Chaplin could transmit subversive signals. Adorno and Horkheimer viewed pop culture as an instrument of economic and political control, enforcing conformity behind a permissive screen. The “culture industry,” as they called it, offered the “freedom to choose what is always the same.” A similar split appeared in attitudes toward traditional forms of culture: classical music, painting, literature. Benjamin, in his resonant sentence linking culture and barbarism, saw the treasures of bourgeois Europe as spoils in a victory procession, each work blemished by the suffering of nameless millions. -- Between them, Adorno and Benjamin were pioneers in thinking critically about pop culture—in taking that culture seriously as an object of scrutiny, whether in tones of delight, dismay, or passionate ambivalence. The worst that one Frankfurt School theorist could say of another was that his work was insufficiently dialectical. The word “dialectic,” as elaborated in the philosophy of Hegel, causes endless problems for people who are not German, and even for some who are. In a way, it is both a philosophical concept and a literary style. --It “mediates,” to use a favorite Frankfurt School word. And it gravitates toward doubt, demonstrating the “power of negative thinking,” as Herbert Marcuse once put it. Such twists and turns come naturally in the German language, whose sentences are themselves plotted in swerves, releasing their full meaning only with the final clinching action of the verb.-- Although Marx was central to their thought, they were nearly as skeptical of Communist ideology as they were of the bourgeois mind-set that Communism was intended to supplant. “At the very heart of Critical Theory was an aversion to closed philosophical systems,” Martin Jay writes, in his history “The Dialectical Imagination” (1973).
books  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  Germany  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  Benjamin  Adorno  cultural_critique  mass_culture  high_culture  aesthetics  literary_history  lit_crit  art_history  music_history  cinema  dialectic  bourgeoisie  capitalism  culture_industries  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Truth is Terrible - in Daniel Came (ed.), Nietzsche on Morality and the Affirmation of Life (Oxford University Press, Forthcoming Feb 2014) :: SSRN
When Nietzsche says, as he frequently does, that "the truth is terrible" he has in mind three kinds of terrible truths: (1) the terrible "existential" truths about the human situation (the inevitability of death and suffering); (2) the terrible "moral" truth that "life is essentially something amoral"; and (3) the terrible "epistemic" truth that most of what we think we know about the world around us is illusory. These terrible truths raise Schopenhauer's question: why continue living at all? Nietzsche's answer, from early in his career to the very end, is that only viewed in terms of aesthetic values can life itself be "justified" (where "justification" really means restoring an affective attachment to life). Something can have aesthetic value even if it has no epistemic value -- indeed, Nietzsche takes it to be a hallmark of art that "the lie hallows itself" and "the willl to deception has good conscience on its side." Similarly, something can have aesthetic value even when it lacks moral value, something well-exemplified, he thinks, by the Homeric sagas. But how could the fact that life exemplifies aesthetic value restore our attachment to life in the face of the terrible existential truths about our situation? I suggest that there are two keys to understanding Nietzsche's answer: first, his assimilation of aesthetic pleasure to a kind of sublimated sexual pleasure; and second, his psychological thesis, central to the Genealogy, that powerful affects neutralize pain, and thus can "seduce" the sufferer back to life. Finally, life can only supply the requisite kind of aesthetic pleasure if it features what I call the "spectacle of genius," the spectacle represented by the likes of Beethoven, Goethe, and Napoleon. Since such geniuses are not possible in a culture dominated by "morality" (in Nietzsche's pejorative sense), the critique of morality is essential to the restoration of an affective attachment to life, since only by defeating morality will the spectacle of genius continue to be possible. - Keywords: Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, life, morality, art, aesthetic value - didn't download
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  values  moral_psychology  genius  aesthetics  Schopenhauer  Dionysian 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
March 2011: The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism - C. Bradley Thompson, Lead Essay | Cato Unbound
Lead Essay -- Neoconservatism Unmasked by C. Bradley Thompson -- Neoconservative intellectuals often describe themselves as having a particular mode of thinking — maybe even just a “mood.” C. Bradley Thompson argues that neoconservatism is much more than that. Its key philosophical inspiration of comes from Irving Kristol, and particularly from Kristol’s engagement with the philosopher Leo Strauss. Thompson argues that, under Straussian influence, neoconservatives champion the rule of a philosophically cunning elite over a population that will never be able to understand their intellectual masters. Instead, the populace is steered toward self-sacrifice, war, and nationalism — as well as a set of religious and moral beliefs that the elites in no way share. Such a doctrine, Thompson charges, points disturbingly toward fascism.
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Germany  Nazis  fascism  liberalism  Strauss  Straussians  neoconservatism  US_politics  Plato-Republic  elites  esotericism  Heidegger  US_history  democracy  relativism  politics-and-religion  nihilism  mass_culture  political_participation  propaganda 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Has Germany sidelined Poland in Ukraine crisis negotiations? | European Council on Foreign Relations - August 2014
The outcome of this effort, unfortunately, has been frustrating: Moscow is not prepared to compromise but instead still wants its demands met. It is holding out for preserving its grip on Ukraine, whether by “freezing” the conflict in East Ukraine or by enforcing concessions from Kyiv in the form of the federalisation of Ukraine. Federalisation would enable Moscow, through its proxies in East Ukraine, to exercise influence over the internal affairs of the Ukrainian state. Up until recently, fears that Germany would push for federalisation on Russian terms seemed justified. -- However, it now looks less likely that Germany wants to engineer such a compromise. The message of Merkel’s late August visit to Kyiv was that any resolution to the conflict would have to respect Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. Berlin is signalling that there will be no return to “business as usual” with Moscow before a sustainable solution to the crisis has been found. Most importantly, Polish diplomatic sources confirm that there is no indication that Berlin is twisting Ukrainian arms to convince them to accept Russia’s condition of federalisation in exchange for a ceasefire. It seems that even Berlin has given up the idea that federalisation on Russian terms would be a viable or desirable option.
Ukraine  Russia  Russia-near_abroad  EU  EU-foreign_policy  Poland  Germany  diplomacy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historians-and-state  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  China  India  Ottomans  Italy  Germany  France  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  philosophes  philosophy_of_history  philology  antiquaries  evidence  scepticism 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
books  etexts  reference  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  exploration  colonialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  France  Germany  Italy  Spain  Spanish_Empire  British_Empire  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Netherlands  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Denmark  Sweden  Russia  Poland  Ottomans  commerce  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  Louis_XIV  military_history  political_culture  political_history  politics-and-religion  art_history  religious_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Rex Gilliland - What Becomes of the Human after Humanism? Heidegger and Derrida | Dartmouth College
We will consider Heidegger’s concept of the human being in the “Letter on ‘Humanism’” and Derrida’s reading of it in “The Ends of Man.” The “Letter on ‘Humanism’” is the first publication in which Heidegger extensively discusses the central themes of his later thought and is also the text that framed Heidegger’s reception in postwar France. In it, Heidegger critically examines the metaphysical foundation of humanism and develops a conception of the human being that attempts to think human decision in terms of its fundamental orientation toward being. Against humanists such as Sartre, Heidegger argues that being, not the human being, is of primary importance. At the same time, he maintains that the human being cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of being because being needs the human being to preserve its truth. We will consider Derrida’s response and his own views about the human being. In “The Ends of Man,” a nuanced reading of this text and the debate about humanism it helped to inspire, Derrida highlights the inadequacies of the interpretations of Heidegger found on both sides of the debate. However, Derrida also argues that there is a certain justification for these readings: Due to the fact that he privileges the human being and defines its essence via the proximity and presence of being, Heidegger fails to escape metaphysics. Does Derrida provide an alternate conception that avoids these difficulties? We will explore these questions by examining Derrida’s notions of undecidability and the relationship to an impossible presence: Is the extreme minimalism of Derrida’s position needed to disrupt the metaphysics of presence, or does it lead to a conception of the human being that is unnecessarily meager?
paper  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  Derrida  humanism  anti-humanism  post-WWII  human_nature  metaphysics  Being  determinism  free_will  responsibility  Sartre  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MALCOLM CROOK and JOHN DUNNE -- THE FIRST EUROPEAN ELECTIONS? VOTING AND IMPERIAL STATE-BUILDING UNDER NAPOLEON, 1802–1813. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 661-697 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MALCOLM CROOK University of Keele and JOHN DUNNE --This article establishes the significance of elections held in the annexed departments of the Napoleonic Empire from 1802 to 1813. It thus represents an original, and perhaps surprising, contribution to recent debate on the nature of Napoleonic imperialism, in which attention has shifted from core to periphery, and away from purely military matters. The electoral process under this authoritarian regime has been alternately neglected or derided, especially where the newly created departments of the Low Countries and parts of Germany and Italy are concerned. However, extensive archival research demonstrates that it was taken extremely seriously by both regime and voters, especially outside metropolitan France. These ‘First European Elections', as they may be dubbed, took place in regular fashion right across the Empire and are studied here on a transnational basis, which also involves the metropolitan departments. Though open to all adult males at the primary level, they were not exercises in democracy, but they did create some rare political space which local people were not slow to exploit for their own purposes. Above all, they served as a means of integrating ‘new Frenchmen’, particularly members of indigenous elites, into the Napoleonic system.
article  paywall  19thC  political_history  political_culture  Napoleonic_Empire  elections  Germany  Italy  Dutch  Netherlands  France  local_politics  elites  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JONATHAN ALLEN GREEN -- FRIEDRICH GENTZ'S TRANSLATION OF BURKE'S "REFLECTIONS" (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 639-659. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JONATHAN ALLEN GREEN - Trinity Hall, Cambridge -- In his influential work on German Romanticism, Isaiah Berlin suggested that Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) catalysed the growth of the nineteenth-century counter-Enlightenment. This causal thesis, however, ignored the extent to which the Reflections' German translator, Friedrich Gentz (1764–1832), altered the meaning of the text to suit his own philosophical agenda. Although Burke saw rationalism and revolution as natural allies, Gentz – a student of Immanuel Kant – used the Reflections to articulate a conservative form of rationalism that, he believed, could stand up to the philosophes' radicalism. Through his selective translation, numerous in-text annotations, and six long interpretive essays, Gentz pressed Burke's Reflections into a Kantian epistemological paradigm – carving out a space for a priori right in the logic of the text, and demoting traditional knowledge from a normative to a prudential role. In Gentz's translation, Burke thus appeared as a champion, not a critic, of Enlightenment. -- * Many thanks to John Robertson, Joachim Whaley, and William O'Reilly for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  18thC  Burke  French_Revolution  translation  Germany  German_Idealism  Kant  rationalist  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-conservative  philosophes  French_Enlightenment  Berlin_Isaiah  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARK HEWITSON - ON WAR AND PEACE: GERMAN CONCEPTIONS OF CONFLICT, 1792–1815 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 447-483 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MARK HEWITSON - University College London -- This article re-examines some of the principal portrayals of military conflict in academic treatises and works of art, arguing that the changing visions of war and peace which they presented were indicative of a wider acceptance within critical sections of the various public spheres of the German lands. The majority of recent studies, which have sought to debunk the myth of national ‘wars of liberation’, have tended to overlook the reasons for and ramifications of such shifts. This study shows how contemporary commentators, faced with an unending series of revolutionary and Napoleonic campaigns, gave up any hope of a perpetual peace and accepted, however reluctantly, the necessity of military conflict. Writers', artists', academics', and other publicists' failure to acknowledge the actual conditions of revolutionary and Napoleonic warfare, despite evidence that the nature of combat had altered, meant that conflicts could be viewed as patriotic, heroic, and defensive struggles, which served to simplify the divided loyalties and complicated diplomacy of the Napoleonic era.
article  paywall  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Germany  Napoleonic_Wars  revolutions  military_history  diplomatic_history  patriotism  nationalism  German_lit  German_Idealism  Romanticism  art_history  political_press  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Schmidt - The Soldier, the Citizen, and the Clergyman, with a Postscript on Professors: Kant on Private Reason (Part II) | Persistent Enlightenment - August 2014
The only sensible response to the question “What would Kant think about Twitter?” is to point out that Kant hasn’t been thinking about anything for at least the last 210 years. But it might be worth pointing out, especially to those who evince concern about (as they tend to say) the “impact” of public statements made by faculty concerning various matters of public interest on the allegedly easily offended minds of students that Kant seems to have assumed that congregations could deal with clergy who instructed them in doctrines that — when they were not in the pulpit — they criticized in writings addressed to the public at large. But then Kant, while conceding that his was not an enlightened age, could still hope that it might be an age of enlightenment. I’d like to think the same. But the way things seem to be going, I wouldn’t bet on it.
intellectual_history  18thC  Germany  Kant  Frederick_the_Great  Prussia  free_speech  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  obligation  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  US_politics  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David Auerbach - Georg Simmel's Philosophy of Money - Waggish - August 2014
Rather than focusing on how people argue over the allocations of values, he looks at how the prior requirement, the nature of valuation itself, influences those discussions. The main themes, as I read them, are the following: 1. Money as a structural metaphor for human existence (almost every aspect of it) 2. The dual nature of the word “value,” moral and monetary 3.The physicalization, universalization, and commodification of value (through money or otherwise) 4. The effects of valuation and commensurability on human relations. The final theme ultimately becomes most important, but Simmel spends time laying the groundwork for it by examining the nature of value and how it is assigned and fixed, before he then moves on to how value is standardized and made portable and universal by money. Simmel’s treatment of “value” is heavily influenced by Kant’s first and third critique, which isn’t too surprising given that Simmel came out of the 19th century neo-Kantian movement which wanted to reclaim Kant’s worth after Hegelianism had petered out. Value, being something not assigned by nature but by creatures, becomes a crucial cognitive category in life, despite being something that each of us has comparatively little control over. (Language is also a category of this sort, though at least in 1900 “value”‘s constructed nature was a bit more clear than that of language.) Simmel makes clear just how philosophical it is by declaring in the introduction that money has attracted his attention because it is the purest and most ubiquitous manifestation of the perennial problem that has vexed philosophers, the relation between the universal and the particular.
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  social_theory  neo-Kantian  Simmel  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  values  money  Cassirer  Germany  constructivism  commodification  universals  particulars  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lawrence A. Vogel - "The Responsibility of Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt versus Hans Jonas" | New School - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal, 2008
C Lawrence A. Vogel, Connecticut College -- Initially published in Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal, 2008, p.253-293. © 2008 The Graduate Faculty Journal of the New School for Social Research -- http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/GFPJ/GFPJ/hmimg.html -- Vogel, Lawrence. "The Responsibility Of Thinking In Dark Times: Hannah Arendt Versus Hans Jonas." Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29.1 (2008): 253-293. Web -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  Germany  Holocaust  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  Arendt  Jonas_Hans  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Epistemic Status of the Human Sciences: Critical Reflections on Foucault (2008) :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 279 -- Any reader of Foucault's corpus recognizes fairly quickly that it is animated by an ethical impulse, namely, to liberate individuals from a kind of oppression from which they suffer. This oppression, however, does not involve the familiar tyranny of the Leviathan or the totalitarian state; it exploits instead values that the victim of oppression herself accepts, and which then leads the oppressed agent to be complicit in her subjugation. It also depends, crucially, on a skeptical thesis about the epistemology of the social sciences. It is this conjunction of claims - that individuals oppress themselves in virtue of certain moral and epistemic norms they accept - that marks Foucault's uniquely disturbing contribution to the literature whose diagnostic aim is, with Max Weber, to understand the oppressive character of modernity, and whose moral aim is, with the Frankfurt School, human liberation and human flourishing. I offer here both a reconstruction of Foucault's project - focusing on the role that ethical and epistemic norms play in how agents subjugate themselves - and some modestly critical reflections on his project, especially the weaknesses in his critique of the epistemic standing of the human sciences. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 18 -- Keywords: Foucault, Nietzsche, human sciences, epistemology -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  social_theory  20thC  Germany  France  Foucault  Weber  Frankfurt_School  ethics  power  institutions  social_order  modernity  flourishing  social_sciences-post-WWII  epistemology-social  norms  socialization  self  morality-conventional  morality-critics  scepticism  agency  agency-structure  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Moral Skepticism and Moral Disagreement in Nietzsche (2013) :: SSRN - Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Vol. 9 (Oxford University Press, 2014)
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 257 -- This essay offers a new interpretation of Nietzsche's argument for moral skepticism.., an argument that should be of independent philosophical interest as well. On this account, Nietzsche offers a version of the argument from moral disagreement, but, unlike familiar varieties, it does not purport to exploit anthropological reports about the moral views of exotic cultures, or even garden-variety conflicting moral intuitions about concrete cases. Nietzsche, instead, calls attention to the single most important and embarrassing fact about the history of moral theorizing by philosophers over two millennia: namely, that no rational consensus has been secured on any substantive, foundational proposition about morality. Persistent and apparently intractable disagreement on foundational questions, of course, distinguishes moral theory from inquiry in the sciences and mathematics (perhaps in kind, certainly in degree). According to Nietzsche, the best explanation for this disagreement is that, even though moral skepticism is true, philosophers can still construct valid dialectical justifications for moral propositions because the premises of different justifications will answer to the psychological needs of at least some philosophers and thus be deemed true by some of them. The essay concludes by considering various attempts to defuse this abductive argument for skepticism based on moral disagreement and by addressing the question whether the argument "proves too much," that is, whether it might entail an implausible skepticism about a wide range of topics about which there is philosophical disagreement. -- Keywords: Nietzsche, morality, skepticism, metaethics, anti-realism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  morality-objective  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  morality-critics  scepticism  human_nature  metaethics  epistemology-moral  foundationalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche's Philosophy of Action (2009) :: SSRN - in Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Action, 2010
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 270 -- Nietzsche holds that people lack freedom of the will in any sense that would be sufficient for ascriptions of moral responsibility; that the conscious experience we have of willing is actually epiphenomenal with respect to the actions that follow that experience; and that our actions largely arise through non-conscious processes (psychological and physiological) of which we are only dimly aware, and over which we exercise little or no conscious control. At the same time, Nietzsche, always a master of rhetoric, engages in a “persuasive definition” (Stevenson 1938) of the language of “freedom” and “free will,” to associate the positive valence of these terms with a certain Nietzschean ideal of the person unrelated to traditional notions of free will. -- No of Pages: 18 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, free will, moral responsibility, freedom, philosophy of action, epiphenomenalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  action-theory  Nietzsche  free_will  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  mind  consciousness  physiology  psychology  naturalism  responsibility  guilt  freedom  epiphenomenal  aesthetics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Morality Critics [chapter] :: SSRN - in THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY, B. Leiter & M. Rosen, eds., Oxford University Press, 2007
U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 114 -- One striking feature of post-Kantian philosophy in Europe has been the emergence of morality critics, philosophers who, contra the popular consensus, dispute the value of morality and the moral life. Their views find a faint echo in the work of some Anglophone moral philosophers (Philippa Foot and Bernard Williams are the main exemplars), but, as we will see, the "Continental" criticisms of morality generally cut far deeper and more radically. -- These Continental morality critics object that morality in practice is an obstacle to human flourishing itself. So understood, this attack on morality raises two immediate questions. First, the Continental morality critics are plainly not without ethical views of their own - ..broadly, about the good life for (some or all) human beings - since it is on the basis of these views that they criticize "morality." -- we can usefully divide Continental critics of morality into two camps: .... In the first camp ... see the individual's acceptance of morality as such as an obstacle to the individual's flourishing; in different ways, Nietzsche and Freud .... In the second camp ... see morality as among the "ideological" instruments that sustain socio-economic relations that are obstacles to individual flourishing. On this second account - ..Marx and perhaps some of ..the Frankfurt School - it is not allegiance to morality per se that thwarts individual flourishing, but rather the role such allegiance plays in sustaining certain socio-economic relations.. We will call the former "Direct Morality Critics" and the latter "Indirect Morality Critics." (Foucault straddles both approaches, and so we will discuss him in a transitional section.) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  metaethics  continental_philosophy  cultural_critique  Germany  France  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Frankfurt_School  Foucault  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  normativity  human_nature  social_order  ideology  bourgeoisie  power  morality-critics  Williams_Bernard  values  ethics  human_condition  flourishing  Aristotelian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche [chapter] (last revised 2013) :: SSRN for Oxford Handbook of 19thC Philosophy, M. Forster & K. Gjesdal, eds. (2014)
This essay offers a philosophical overview of the central themes of Nietzsche's philosophy, addressing (1) the primary intellectual influences on his work (esp. the PreSocratics, Schopenhauer, and Lange); (2) the style in which he writes and his philosophical reasons for it; (3) his philosophical naturalism and its role in his conception of the mind and agency; (4) his critique of morality and its connection with the idea that there can be an "aethestic" justification for existence, notwithstanding the terrible truths about human existence (such as suffering and death); and (5) competing interpretations of his views on truth and knowledge. Certain well-known Nietzschean ideas -- like "will to power," "eternal recurrence," and perspectivism -- are also located and explained within this philosophical framework. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  books  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  pre-Socratics  Schopenhauer  Lange  naturalism  moral_psychology  epistemology  mind  agency  aesthetics  human_nature  perspectivism  relativism  will_to_power  elite_culture  mass_culture  German_Idealism  human_condition  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Robert Alexy's Radbruch Formula, and the Nature of Legal Theory (2006) :: SSRN
Rechtstheorie, Vol. 37, pp. 139-149, 2006 -- Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper 06-13 -- Gustav Radbruch is well known for a formula that addresses the conflict of positive law and justice, a formula discussed in the context of the consideration of Nazi laws by the courts in the post-War German Federal Republic, and East German laws in the post-unification German courts. More recently, Robert Alexy has defended a version of Radbruch's formula, offering arguments for it that are different from and more sophisticated than those that were adduced by Radbruch himself. Alexy also placed Radbruch's formula within a larger context of conceptual analysis and theories about the nature of law. Both Radbruch and Alexy claim that their positions are incompatible with legal positivism, and therefore count as a rejection (and perhaps, refutation) of it. This paper, presented at a Conference on the work of Gustav Radbruch, looks at Radbruch's formula and Alexy's version of it. It focuses not so much on the merit of the Radbruch-Alexy formula, as on its proper characterization, and its appropriate placement within the larger context of legal philosophy. The particular focus is the methodological question of what Radbruch and Alexy's formulations - and their strengths and weaknesses - can show us about the nature of theorizing about law. -- Keywords: Robert Alexy, Gustav Radbruch, legal positivism, natural law theory, nature of law, conceptual theories, unjust laws -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  Germany  social_sciences-post-WWII  Nazis  analytical_philosophy  concepts  natural_law  moral_philosophy  positivism-legal  sociology_of_law  justice  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Legal Positivism (posted 2003) :: SSRN - BLACKWELL GUIDE TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW AND LEGAL THEORY, Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson, eds., Blackwell, 2005
This article tries to present the jurisprudential school of thought, legal positivism, within a larger context than is usual in contemporary English-language discussions of that approach: (1) showing the intellectual and political contexts in which the movement began; (2) emphasizing the variety of theories that fit under that label (e.g., how the Kelsenian tradition varies significantly from the Hartian tradition); and (3) discussing how the future development of legal positivism will depend on its discussion of wider theoretical issues (e.g., the proper approach to social theory, and the use of conceptual analysis in philosophy). The article also summarizes the main criticisms of legal positivism, and gives an overview of the internal debate of inclusive legal positivism versus exclusive legal positivism. Note: This is a description of the paper and not the actual abstract -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Germany  Anglo-American  positivism-legal  Kelsen  Hart  social_theory  sociology_of_law  analytical_philosophy  concepts  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Steven Green - Hans Kelsen and the Logic of Legal Systems :: SSRN 53 Alabama Law Review 365-413 (2003)
Hans Kelsen's formalism and Kantianism have been barriers to an appreciation of his work in the US. This article offers a sympathetic reading of Kelsen's approach in legal theory by drawing analogies between it and the writings of Gottlob Frege. For Frege, the subject matter of logic is the necessary relations between linguistic meanings. These relations can be seen as necessary only on the assumption that linguistic meanings are abstract objects that cannot be reduced to anything empirical. For this reason Frege rejected psychologism in logic. Like many other late-19thC anti-psychologists, Frege offered a Neo-Kantian account of how non-empirical knowledge of meanings is possible. Analogously, Kelsen argued that legal meanings are abstract objects. Kelsen proposed an analysis of the necessary relations between legal meanings - a logic of legal systems - that is similar to the Fregean logician's account of language. Kelsen offered a Neo-Kantian account of how knowledge of legal meanings is possible. Although I do not undertake to defend the details of Kelsen's approach, I hope to make his third way between empiricist and natural law theories approaches in jurisprudence more understandable and attractive to American audiences. -- Keywords: Hans Kelsen, Kant, Frege, Neo-Kantianism, logic, legal systems, jurisprudence, philosophy of law - Green now says he's happy with most of the paper except the 1st part dealing with Frege -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  neo-Kantian  logic  Frege  meaning  philosophy_of_language  natural_law  psychologism  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Steven Green - Kelsen, Quietism, and the Rule of Recognition (2008 last revised 2011) :: SSRN
Research paper to appear in THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION, Matthew D. Adler, Kenneth E. Himma eds., Oxford University Press, -- Sometimes the fact that something is the law can be justified by the law. For example, Sarbanes-Oxley is the law because it was enacted by Congress pursuant to the Commerce Clause. But eventually legal justification of law ends. The ultimate criteria of validity cannot themselves be justified by law. According to H.L.A. Hart, justification of these ultimate criteria is still available, by reference to social facts concerning official acceptance - facts about what Hart calls the "rule of recognition" for the system. Drawing upon criticisms of sociological accounts of the law that can be found in the writings of Hans Kelsen, I argue in this essay that Hart's approach cannot account for statements about the law that assert the independence of legal validity from rule of recognition facts. I offer as an alternative a legal quietist approach, which can account for such statements. For the quietist, legal justification exhausts the possible justification for law. If our judgments about the law are fundamental, in the sense that they cannot be justified by other judgments about the law, then they have no justification (which is not to say that they should be abandoned). I argue that legal quietism is exemplified - if somewhat imperfectly - in Kelsen's writings, and I end the essay by exploring some difficulties that the quietist approach must face. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  20thC  Germany  Anglo-American  legal_theory  positivism-legal  Hart  Kelsen  social_theory  sociology_of_law  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Two Books of the Elements of Universal Jurisprudence [1660] trans. William Abbott Oldfather, 1931. Revised and ed. Thomas Behme (2009) - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Two Books of the Elements of Universal Jurisprudence, translated by William Abbott Oldfather, 1931. Revised by Thomas Behme. Edited and with an Introduction by Thomas Behme (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2009). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2220> -- This was Pufendorf’s first work, published in 1660. Its appearance effectively inaugurated the modern natural-law movement in the German-speaking world. The work also established Pufendorf as a key figure and laid the foundations for his major works, which were to sweep across Europe and North America. Pufendorf rejected the concept of natural rights as liberties and the suggestion that political government is justified by its protection of such rights, arguing instead for a principled limit to the state’s role in human life. - downloaded ebook to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  intellectual_history  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  Pufendorf  state-roles  Grotius  sociability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, eds. & trans. Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert - Online Library of Liberty
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, edited, translated, and with an Introduction by Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1926> -- The essays selected here for translation derive largely from Thomasius’s work on Staatskirchenrecht, or the political jurisprudence of church law. These works, originating as disputations, theses, and pamphlets, were direct interventions in the unresolved issue of the political role of religion in Brandenburg-Prussia, a state in which a Calvinist dynasty ruled over a largely Lutheran population and nobility as well as a significant Catholic minority. In mandating limited religious toleration within the German states, the provisions of the Peace of Westphalia (1648) also provided the rulers of Brandenburg-Prussia with a way of keeping the powerful Lutheran church in check by guaranteeing a degree of religious freedom to non-Lutherans and thereby detaching the state from the most powerful territorial church. Thomasius’s writings on church-state relations, many of them critical of the civil claims made by Lutheran theologians, are a direct response to this state of affairs. At the same time, owing to the depth of intellectual resources at his disposal, these works constitute a major contribution to the broader discussion of the relation between the religious and political spheres. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  Prussia  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  Lutherans  Calvinist  Catholics  confessionalization  religion-established  politics-and-religion  church_courts  tolerance  religious_culture  political_culture  Westphalia  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations [1737] with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull trans., eds. Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder - Online Library of Liberty
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations, with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull. Translated from the Latin by George Turnbull, edited with an Introduction by Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2305> -- The natural law theory of Johann Gottlieb Heineccius was one of the most influential to emerge from the early German Enlightenment. Heineccius continued and, in important respects, modified the ideas of his predecessors, Samuel Pufendorf and Christian Thomasius. He developed distinctive views on central questions such as the freedom of the human will and the natural foundation of moral obligation, which also sharply distinguished him from his contemporary Christian Wolff. The Liberty Fund edition is based on the translation by the Scottish moral philosopher George Turnbull (1698–1748). It includes Turnbull’s extensive comments on Heineccius’s text, as well as his substantial Discourse upon the Nature and Origin of Moral and Civil Laws. These elements make the work into one of the most extraordinary encounters between Protestant natural law theory and neo-republican civic humanism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Germany  Heineccius  Pufendorf  Thomasius  Wolff  Turnbull_George  natural_law  international_law  legal_theory  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  obligation  free_will  state-of-nature  government-forms  authority  legitimacy  natural_rights  natural_religion  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
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