dunnettreader + gender_history   24

Orlando: An audio guide | OUPblog
Interview with Michael Whitworth, editor of Works of Virginia Woolf and Oxford Classics edition of Orlando
fiction  identity  cultural_history  biography  20thC  Modernism  audio  homosexuality  sexuality  postmodern  literary_history  historical_fiction  19thC  gender_history  Woolf_Virginia 
april 2017 by dunnettreader
GAUTIER, Théophile – Mademoiselle de Maupin | Litterature audio.com
Donneur de voix : René Depasse | Durée : 14h | Genre : Romans
Le jeune et fougueux romantique Gautier raconte dans ce roman épistolaire l’existence tumultueuse de Mademoiselle de Maupin qui, pour surprendre les secrets des hommes, se travestit en Théodore et connaît des aventures galantes. Il (elle) est même contraint(e) de se battre en duel pour avoir refusé d’épouser une jeune fille…
Folles aventures, descriptions éblouissantes dans ce premier roman (1835) qui provoqua un véritable scandale.
« Les femmes sont curieuses ; fassent le ciel et la morale qu’elles contentent leurs curiosités d’une manière plus légitime qu’Ève leur grand-mère, et n’aillent pas faire des questions au serpent. »
audio-books  French_lit  French_language  19thC  Gautier_Théophile  novels  cultural_critique  social_order  gender_history  gender_roles  epistolary  masculinity 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Joanne Bailey - Unquiet Lives: Marriage and Marriage Breakdown in England, 1660–1800 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
Drawing upon vivid court records and newspaper advertisements, this study challenges traditional views of married life in 18thC England. It reveals husbands' and wives' expectations and experiences of marriage to expose the extent of co-dependency between spouses. The book, therefore, presents a new picture of power in marriage and the household. It also demonstrates how attitudes towards adultery and domestic violence evolved during this period, influenced by profound shifts in cultural attitudes about sexuality and violence.
- An unusually detailed model of married life in the eighteenth century, which stresses co-dependency between husband and wife
- Charts thinking towards violence and adultery in the eighteenth century, focusing as much on men's needs and dependence as on those of women
1. Introduction: assessing marriage
2. 'To have and to hold': analysing married life
3. 'For better, for worse': resolving marital difficulties
4. 'An honourable estate': marital roles in the household
5. 'With all my worldly goods I thee endow': spouses' contributions and possessions within marriage
6. 'Wilt thou obey him and serve him': the marital power balance
7. 'Forsaking all other': marital chastity
8. 'Till death us do part': life after a failed marriage
9. 'Mutual society, help and comfort': conclusion
downloaded intro via AIR
books  downloaded  17thC  18thC  British_history  social_theory  gender_history  cultural_history  sex  chastity  adultery  marriage  family  property_rights  women-legal_status  authority  patriarchy  gender  identity  masculinity  femininity  violence  judiciary  Church_of_England  inheritance  children  church_courts  reform-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium. (eBook, Paperback 2015 and Hardcover 2013)
2nd volume of 2 collecting her work across her career - Unrivalled Influence explores the exceptional roles that women played in the vibrant cultural and political life of medieval Byzantium. Written by one of the world's foremost historians of the Byzantine millennium, this landmark book evokes the complex and exotic world of Byzantium's women, from empresses and saints to uneducated rural widows. Drawing on a diverse range of sources, Herrin sheds light on the importance of marriage in imperial statecraft, the tense coexistence of empresses in the imperial court, and the critical relationships of mothers and daughters. She looks at women's interactions with eunuchs, the in-between gender in Byzantine society, and shows how women defended their rights to hold land. Herrin describes how they controlled their inheritances, participated in urban crowds demanding the dismissal of corrupt officials, followed the processions of holy icons and relics, and marked religious feasts with liturgical celebrations, market activity, and holiday pleasures. The vivid portraits that emerge here reveal how women exerted an unrivalled influence on the patriarchal society of Byzantium, and remained active participants in the many changes that occurred throughout the empire's millennial history. Unrivalled Influence brings together Herrin's finest essays on women and gender written throughout the long span of her esteemed career. This volume includes three new essays published here for the very first time and a new general introduction - Herrin. She also provides a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader views about women and Byzantium. -- Intro downloaded to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  women-intellectuals  women-in-politics  empires-governance  property_rights  women-property  court_culture  eunuchs  inheritance  gender_history  gender-and-religion  marriage  diplomatic_history  elites-political_influence  political_culture  popular_culture  popular_politics  ritual  Early_Christian  church_history  religious_imagery  religious_practices  religious_art  women-education  education-women  education-elites  Orthodox_Christianity  women-rulers 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Kristin M. Girten - Unsexed Souls: Natural Philosophy as Transformation in Eliza Haywood's Female Spectator (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 55-74 -- Though love and marriage are Eliza Haywood's central concerns in The Female Spectator, the first periodical written by a woman with a primarily female audience in mind, in a series of issues devoted to the study of Baconian empiricism, Haywood turns her attention away from such concerns to the natural world. This essay aims to determine what is at stake in the Female Spectator's philosophical interactions with nature. It argues that, for Haywood, natural philosophy is a tool with which women may expand the horizon of, and thereby reshape, the sphere to which they are consigned.-- lots of primary sources from Margaret Cavendish and Robert Boyle through 1st few decades of 18thC plus lit survey on gender, patriarchy etc in last few decades in literary history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  gender_history  17thC  18thC  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  women-intellectuals  empiricism  Haywood  1700s  1710s  Boyle  virtue_epistemology  self-development  self-knowledge  domesticity  science-public  publishing-women  Spectator  Cavendish_Margaret  Astell  bibliography 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - An Anthropological Approach to Gay Marriage | The American Conservative - April 2015
This is an absolutely superb post, pointing out the universal logic across cultures to establish default rules for managing the key elements of family law shared across nuclear and extended families which the society has an interest in ensuring are dealt with in a regular rather than ad hoc fashion -- reproduction of the society through the production of children and their upbringing and material survival, and property relations, especially inheritance. He uses the Old Testament, and the shifts in rules as the culture developed (marrying the widow of one’s brother to ensure that the brother had an inheritance line within the family, which "law" has obviously been relaxed or abandoned as the clan or extended family ceased to be the organizing structure for families and property), as well as common practices (implicit rules) when the standard pattern of relations wasn't working (the patriarchs using concubines to produce heirs when their wives were barren). He also gives the example in Kenya of an unmarried older woman with no children who marries a younger woman, serves as the 'husband" in the marriage, and the younger woman uses men to get pregnant and "bear the children of the all-female family" who will inherit the "husband's" property. The contemporary state in the US has an interest in providing default rules for marriage, family formation and child care, and property relations including inheritance -- and since WE HAVE same-sex marriages that present exactly the same legal issues, the state has an interest in extending its default rules to those arrangements.
politics-and-religion  family  property  inheritance  marriage  US_legal_system  SCOTUS  Old_Testament  religion-fundamentalism  Biblical_authority  religious_culture  culture_wars  homosexuality  civil_liberties  gender_history  gender-and-religion  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Marshall Brown, ed. - The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Romanticism, Vol. 5 (pbk 2007) | Cambridge University Press
This latest volume in the celebrated Cambridge History of Literary Criticism addresses literary criticism of the Romantic period, chiefly in Europe. Its seventeen chapters are by internationally respected academics and explore a range of key topics and themes. The book is designed to help readers locate essential information and to develop approaches and viewpoints for a deeper understanding of issues discussed by Romantic critics or that were fundamental to their works. Primary and secondary bibliographies provide a guide for further research. **--** Introduction *-* 1. Classical standards in the Romantic period - Paul H. Fry *-* 2. Innovation and modernity Alfredo De Paz *-* 3. The French Revolution - David Simpson *-* 4. Transcendental philosophy and romantic criticism - David Simpson *-* 5. Nature - Helmut J. Schneider *-* 6. Scientific models - Joel Black *-* 7. Religion and literature - E. S. Shaffer
8. Romantic language theory and the art of understanding - Kurt Mueller-Vollmer *-* 9. The Romantic transformation of rhetoric - David Wellbery *-* 10. Romantic irony - Gary Handwerk *-* 11. Theories of genre - Tilottama Rajan *-* 12. Theory of the novel - Marshall Brown *-* 13. The impact of Shakespeare - Jonathan Arac *-* 14. The vocation of criticism and the crisis of the republic of letters - Jon Klancher *-* 15. Women, gender, and literary criticism - Theresa M. Kelley *-* 16. Literary history and historicism - David Perkins *-* 17. Literature and the other arts - Herbert Lindenberger **--** downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  philosophy_of_language  Shakespeare-influence  classicism  modernity  German_Idealism  science-public  reason  irony  professionalization  authors-women  subjectivity  nature  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Ann Bach - (Re)placing John Donne in the History of Sexuality | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 259-289
Interesting challenge to readings that ignore Donne's religion, his culture's attitudes towards women and sex, and the blatant misogyny in his verse -as well as the question what "heterosexual identity" would have meant for him since readers interested in modern sexuality have identified him as where we can start identifying with him as a "modern" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  social_history  gender_history  lit_crit  historiography  17thC  English_lit  Donne  poetry  sexuality  heterosexuality  identity  self  self-fashioning  theology  patriarchy  misogyny  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Mrinalini Sinha, review - Kathleen Wilson, The Island Race: Englishness, Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 253-254
Very enthusiastic -- 5 essays with "performativity" common thread in development of national ID. The theme of performance has less to do with postmodernism and Butler and more to do with the sort of work of 18thC scholarship on self and fluid categories capable of different performance, masquerading etc of Wahrman etc. Several essays linked to Captain Cook"s voyages -- e.g. how lower social status of the heroic captain could be accommodated in an emerging "empire of the seas" narrative. Wilson tracks how initial reports of cultures with extremely alien sexual practices get gradually framed in the rigid taxonomy that Wahrman showed appearing suddenly in last quarter of 18thC - Wilson links this more to evangelicals than ethnography per se. Downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  kindle-available  cultural_history  gender_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  national_ID  imperialism  self  identity  masculinity  femininity  sexuality  Evangelical  ethnography  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Deborah Valenze, review - Hilda L. Smith, All Men and Both Sexes: Gender, Politics, and the False Universal in England, 1640-1832 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 251-252
Looks like a mess, both in what she selects to dig into in episodes from medieval guilds to 1832 Reform - and in not engaging with previous work of scholars on the shift of valorisation of independent male citizen vs dependent disappearing status of women -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  19thC  cultural_history  gender_history  British_history  British_politics  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ALISON WINCH - "Orlando", Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Reclaiming Sapphic Connections | JSTOR: Critical Survey, Vol. 19, No. 1 (2007), pp. 51-61
Interesting on Virginia Woolf not just on gender expectations and sexuality. Focus on Woolf's interest in Lady Mary's own attempts at autobiography, history of her times etc. Highly critical on historical scholarship (Daddy issues) and writing biography, how it necessarily is assembled from fragments using imagination and mangles a "life". Apart from the stuff on Wolff, has also lots of useful information and bibliography re Lady Mary, publication history of her Turkish letters, poetry, correspondence etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  18thC  20thC  Montagu_Lady_Mary  Wolff_Virginia  biography-writing  gender_history  sexuality  homosexuality  poetry  identity  femininity  masculinity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM VAN REYK -- CHRISTIAN IDEALS OF MANLINESS IN THE 18thC AND EARLY 19thC | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2009), pp. 1053-1073
Over 100 references listed with lots of links to jstor articles on the jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge journals -- Christian ideals of manliness were articulated by writers across the religious spectrum throughout the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. At their heart was the shared ideal of the imitation of Christ, an all-encompassing Christian ideal of personhood. Whilst non-partisanship was itself an important ideal, theological differences and disagreements over the strictness of ideals led to accusations that some Christians, attacked as 'moralists' or 'enthusiasts', undermined or neglected ideals of manliness. At the same time, there were attempts to associate Christian ideals of manliness exclusively with the emerging 'Evangelical' party. In the historiography of masculinity in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, however, Christian ideals have often been marginalized, and, when considered, they have tended to be misconstrued by the adoption of church-party approaches. This review offers a detailed critique of Leonore Davidoff and Catherine Hall's account of Evangelical ideals of manliness in Family fortunes: men and women of the English middle class, 1780–1850 (1987; rev. edn, 2002). Their notion of distinctive 'Evangelical' ideals of manliness does not withstand scrutiny, and the key concepts associated with them, including 'domesticity', 'the calling', 'the world', 'public', and 'private', demand revision. At the same time, they gave insufficient consideration to 'solitude' and 'charity'.
article  jstor  paywall  cultural_history  religious_history  gender_history  18thC  19thC  masculinity  morality-Christian  Evangelical  enthusiasm  historians-and-religion  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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