dunnettreader + gender_gap   4

Ben Zipperer - How raising the minimum wage ripples through the workforce | Washington Center for Equitable Growth - April 2015
Summary of research by several economists -- the failure to index the minimum wage has been a big part of increasing inequality at the bottom of the income distribution, especially for wonen. Discusses the ripple effects that have fully dissipated by the 25th percentile -- charts and pdf available
US_economy  economic_history  20thC  21stC  post-Cold_War  wages  wages-minimum  gender_gap  inequality  Labor_markets 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Janice Peterson - Welfare Reform and Inequality: The TANF and UI Programs | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 517-526
The threat was already well known that Clinton welfare reform gains were a result of the booming economy, still left beneficiaries in the working poor world, and would create major problems in an economic downturn -- especially since it reinforced the hierarchy of 20thC social support programs that devalued and discriminated against women's work, removed some safeguards for especially vulnerable poor women with children who had fragile attachment to the labor market, and failed to forsee perverse interaction between the employment requirements of TANF qualifications and eligibility for unemployment insurance. The article reviews literature already emerging on the destructive features of the program design - which were exacerbated in the Great Recession by block grants to states with pro-cyclical budget constraints and in Red States interested only in further reducing welfare rolls and recipients of unemployment insurance, and a Congress hijacked by the Tea Party antagonistic to any countercyclical fiscal policy, especially for poor and unemployed. Short article, didn't download
article  jstor  US_economy  US_politics  state_government  welfare  poverty  women-work  poor-working  unemployment  gender_gap  1990s  Clinton_Administration  Democrats  social_insurance 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
David H. Ciscel - The Living Wage Movement: Building a Political Link from Market Wages to Social Institutions | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 527-535
Plus çà change - even in the good times of the 1990s boom, low wages were not keeping up with maintaining minimum living standards without supplemental government assistance -- Looks at attempts in late 1990s to build political pressure for an increased minimum wage - already the low end service sector was seeing growing between their stagnant wages and growing GNP, with gains going to upper cohorts. Special issues already including (1) service sector jobs with lots of women, so degraded status, (2) outsourcing of jobs that would have been low end civil service, reducing both pay and benefits plus job security. Gives a history of the periodic movements for defining minimum wage levels to incorporate the costs of reproducing the labor force, from health care, child care, nutrition etc. Early 20thC movement was for a "family wage" pushed by unions, but problems for feminists that the focus on family defined women's roles in the home as part of determining what employment should produce as base compensation for maintaining the family, with women's work uncompensated. Short article, didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  economic_culture  US_economy  20thC  Progressive_Era  1990s  wages  wages-minimum  women-work  feminism  feminist_economics  unions  inequality  Democrats  productivity-labor_share  gender_gap  alliances-political  movements-political  US_politics  poor-working  poverty 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Libby Nelson - The surprising truth about downward mobility in US higher education - Vox September 2014
In most developed countries, education builds from generation to generation: Adults often have more education than their parents, and they expect their children will be better-educated still — or at least they expect their children won't slip behind. But data released today from the OECD shows this isn't happening in the US nearly as much as it does elsewhere. America has more students falling behind their parents than most other developed countries. Almost 1 in 4 American adults age 25 to 34 has less education than his or her parents. -- worse for men
US_society  US_economy  OECD_economies  education-higher  education-women  college  mobility  gender_gap  inequality  middle_class 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

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