dunnettreader + free_will   59

David James, ed., Hegel's Elements of the Philosophy of Right: A Critical Guide - review by William Desmond | BDPR - Dec 2017
David James (ed.), Hegel's Elements of the Philosophy of Right: A Critical Guide, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 234 pp.,
Reviewed by William Desmond, Villanova University/KU Leuven
Evernote  political_philosophy  19thC  Hegel  intellectual_history  individualism  books  community  social_theory  Marx  German_Idealism  free_will  German_philosophy  reviews  Hegelian  Hegel-philosophy_of_right 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Leo Damrosh - The Enlightenment: Invention of the Modern Self | The Great Courses
Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self - from opening views in 17thC, through stages of the Enlightenment - a road to its (inevitable?) backlash in Romanticism
24 lectures
Only available as Audio download (and streaming) - list price $130
Rave reviews
Uses literary works and philosophical texts together
Frex completes the 2 lectures on British empiricism (focus on Locke and Hume re the self) with how Pope struggles with capturing complex psychology within the empiricist framework
After an introduction of 17thC religious and secular conceptions of the self, starts with 2 on La Princesse de Clèves
After empiricism, 2 on Voltaire and theodicy in Candide
3 lectures on Diderot and Jacques le fataliste
A lot of Rousseau - not the novels but the autobiographical works - how he analyzes himself in Confessions and Solitary Walker
Lots of biography, with Boswell's Johnson the vehicle
Some Franklin and Smith
Finishes with Laclos and Blake
Romanticism  bibliography  reason-passions  poetry  Boswell  self  moral_psychology  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_Revolution-impact  Rousseau  free_will  Locke-education  buy  human_nature  Diderot  Blake_William  Locke  Hume-causation  autobiography  17thC  Rousseau-self  Hume-ethics  altruism  Johnson  Voltaire  novels  empiricism  18thC  moral_philosophy  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Pope_Alexander  courses  French_lit  Smith  Hume  determinism  epistemology  emotions  character  audio  psychology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Les Cahiers Jules Lequier et la renaissance d'une pensée éternelle (2011) - Cairn.info
The Amis de Jules Lequier have published 2 volumes of his notebooks with lots of related materials on the intellectual mileux that he was responding to and biographical material relevant to his thought -- La deuxième livraison des Cahiers Jules Lequier est surtout biobibliographique. Le dossier central (« Jules Lequier et la Bretagne ») éclaire l’œuvre de l’auteur par sa vie, et sa vie par son enracinement en terre bretonne. Là encore, l’essentiel est à saisir à travers l’accidentel, comme le philosophique à travers le biographique. Outre un entretien avec Jacques Josse, on lira les articles de Jean Grenier, de Yannick Pelletier et de Jean-Marie Turpin. La plus grande partie du numéro est consacrée à la « Bibliographie commentée », établie par D. Wayne Viney et G. Le Brech. Toutes les éditions (posthumes) des œuvres de Lequier sont mentionnées, ainsi que tous les travaux portant explicitement sur le philosophe, ou y faisant référence. Ce recensement exhaustif (qui est aussi un résumé-commentaire de chaque parution) constitue un outil de recherche très précieux
religious_belief  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_religion  19thC  Providence  books  Catholics  Renouvier  free_will  France  reviews  liberty  individualism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Sino Knuuttila - Medieval Theories of Future Contingents [updated 2015] | (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Related Entries
Auriol [Aureol, Aureoli], Peter | Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus | fatalism | free will: divine foreknowledge and | future contingents | Gersonides | Gregory of Rimini | Holkot [Holcot], Robert | modality: medieval theories of | prophecy
contingency  Boethius  modal_logic  logic  free_will  Cicero  divine_​omniscience  Aristotle  fate  Abelard  Aquinas  necessity  SCOTUS  Providence  prophecy  medieval_philosophy  future_contingents  God-attributes 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
E.J.Lowe, review essay. - Locke: Compatibilist Event-Causalist or Libertarian Substance-Causalist? (2004) | JSTOR - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research
Review essay - Yaffe, G., 2000. Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research
Vol. 68, No. 3 (May, 2004), pp. 688-701 - downloaded to iPhone - DBOX
agency  reviews  free_will  jstor  downloaded  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  causation 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, Stoics Against Stoics in Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill (2012) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/5 (2012), 935-52 -- In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ (ἐφ᾽ ἡμῖν) and that these things are the product of our choice (προαίρεσις). These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Cambridge Platonism, Epictetus, Freewill and Determinism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  determinism  free_will  late_antiquity  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  17thC  18thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Death of God and the Death of Morality [Nietzsche] :: SSRN - September 16, 2015
University of Chicago -' Nietzsche famously proclaimed the "death of God," but in so doing it was not God's death that was really notable -- Nietzsche assumes that most reflective, modern readers realize that "the belief in the Christian god has become unbelievable" (GS 343) -- but the implications of that belief becoming unbelievable, namely, "how much must collapse now that this faith has been undermined," in particular, "the whole of our European morality" (GS 343). What is the connection between the death of God and the death of morality? I argue that Nietzsche thinks the death of God will undermine two central aspects of our morality: its moral egalitarianism, and its belief in moral responsibility and warranted guilt. I offer an account of how Nietzsche sees the connections, and conclude with some skeptical considerations about whether Nietzsche was right that atheism would, in fact, undermine morality. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, theism, morality -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  moral_philosophy  religious_belief  religious_culture  19thC  Nietzsche  theism  atheism  God-existence  moral_psychology  morality-Nietzche  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  morality-objective  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  guilt  norms  obligation  responsibility  free_will  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jared P. Friedman and Anthony I. Jack - Mapping cognitive structure onto philosophical debate re problems of consciousness, free will and ethics | Minds Online - Sept 2015 - Session 1 - Social Cognition
Mapping cognitive structure onto the landscape of philosophical debate: An empirical framework with relevance to problems of consciousness, free will and ethics -- Department of Philosophy and Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence, Case Western Reserve University -- There are some seemingly intractable questions that have remained at the heart of philosophical discourse since they were first asked. Is the mind distinct from the brain or are we just physical stuff? Are we autonomous agents or merely at the mercy of the causal and mechanistic laws of nature? When, if ever, is it acceptable to sacrifice one for the greater good of many? That these questions have remained at the heart of philosophy for so long, and that their ‘solutions’ (e.g., monism vs. dualism) seem to be incommensurable with each other, strikes us as enigmatic. Might the intractable nature of these and other appropriately identified problems reflect something peculiar about us rather than something peculiar about the way the world is? (...) This account maintains that the difficulties reconciling markedly different philosophical responses to these three questions arise from an unavoidable tension between two anatomically independent and functionally inhibitory neural networks, both of which are essential to human understanding. This account is motivated by the observation that both philosophers and non-philosophers experience difficulty in reconciling competing responses to these questions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  conference  cognition  antimonies  consciousness  mind-body  neuroscience  determinism  free_will  naturalism  physicalism  reductionism  causation  moral_philosophy  metaethics  intuitions  brain  experimental_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  James_William  monism  dualism  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Neil Sinhababu, review - Maudemarie Clark, Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics (OUP 2015) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 09, 2015
Nietzsche scholarship has made impressive progress over the last thirty years, with lots of excellent work now available to help puzzled readers understand Nietzsche's provocative and often beautiful writing. Maudemarie Clark's Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy was a big step forward in our understanding of his metaphysics and epistemology. Her Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics is a collection of fourteen essays mostly on Nietzsche's practical philosophy, ending with four on metaphysical issues that are related to the normative issues discussed earlier in the book. Most were published previously -- the oldest in 1987 and the newest in 2014 -- though two are revised versions of unpublished lectures and one is a remix of material from her recent book. Some appeared in obscure venues, so this volume helps readers access all of them. -- Highly recommends the introduction discussing each essay and broader framework for placing her discussion
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  metaphysics  political_philosophy  free_will  responsibility  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Oeuvres complètes - VAUVENARGUES | Éditions CODA
Mort à trente-deux ans après de longues souffrances, Vauvenargues (1715-1747) est l’un des premiers et des plus intègres représentants des Lumières. Issu de la noblesse de Provence, c’est celle du cœur et des aspirations qu’il admire. Il affirme la bonté de la Nature et du cœur. Il prône le culte des grandes passions, l’amour, et surtout l’amitié, persuadé que l’instinct de l’homme, quand la raison et le cœur le guident, est orienté vers le bien. Homme de haute culture, il méprise les valeurs qu’il voit en œuvre autour de lui et qui nous sont restées largement contemporaines : la sordide habileté, le culte de l’argent, le cynisme, l’idôlatrie de l’apparence, le snobisme et la trahison. Admiré, entre autres, par Mirabeau et Voltaire, avec qui il entretient une passionnante correspondance, Vauvenargues demeure l’incarnation littéraire d’une qualité précieuse entre toutes : la noblesse naturelle de l’esprit.
French_language  French_Enlightenment  Pascal  free_will  Spinozism  Vauvenargues  intellectual_history  Voltaire  books  18thC 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Charlie Huenemann, review - Matthew J. Kisner and Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This volume presents a cohesive and engaging set of essays, converging on the question: was Spinoza frowning or smiling? ...as he surveyed the wide range of human moral phenomena, did he merely bemoan our superstitious beliefs and ignorant behaviors? Or did he see some of it as truly virtuous? But how can anything be virtuous, if all human actions are completely determined by an infinite substance that doesn't give a damn what happens? --...Charles Jarrett's essay forcefully presents the challenges of finding genuine morality in Spinoza's philosophy. As Jarrett reads him, Spinoza left himself no room to construct a meaningful "ideal" of human behavior. Indeed, "good" itself is misleading, as Spinoza "advocates or recommends that we take a perspective from which good and evil cannot be conceived. He thus seems... to advocate, a transcendence of ethics". -- Several essays take up Jarrett's challenge. -- Some of the essays are concerned with saving the possibility of Spinoza's morality from other doctrines he espoused. Michael LeBuffe ("Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics") -- Karolina Hübner rescues meaningful discourse about humanity as a whole in the face of Spinoza's disdain for universals. Eugene Marshall ("Man is a God to Man: How Humans can be Adequate Causes") defends the intelligibility, within Spinoza's determinism, that some actions can be autonomous and hence "free". -- Some of the essays provide broad and masterful perspective... meditations on the nature and significance of Spinoza's ethical project. -- A final trio of essays connects Spinoza's morality with the claims regarding "eternity" in Part V of the Ethics. These are especially welcome, as Spinoza's mystical claims are sometimes treated as an embarrassment or as a separate island of befuddlement. -- there is not a single clunker in the lot. The introduction is a thoughtful overview of the terrain that also provides a useful integration of the chapters that follow. If you are studying Spinoza's ethical theory, you need this book.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  determinism  free_will  causation  good  evil  infinity  virtue 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Bartley, review - Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 16, 2014
Reviewed by Christopher Bartley, University of Liverpool -- This is a fine collection of learned essays replete with translations from primary sources, but a sense of frustration may be induced in the reader attracted by the book's title. Most of the contributors admit that the topics of free will, agency and selfhood as understood in the West today don't really have equivalents in the Indian traditions of thought and practice under consideration.
books  reviews  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Hinduism  Buddhism  Sanskrit  free_will  self  ontology  metaphysics  reincarnation  metempsychosis  emotions  desire  agency 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
David Shoemaker, Tulane University, review - Derk Pereboom, Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 14, 2014
This is basically a new and improved version of Derk Pereboom's important Living Without Free Will (2001). In the thirteen-year interval, his skepticism about free will has been the subject of lots of critical scrutiny (with over 600 citations). Pereboom has taken this scrutiny seriously, and in this book he lays out a refined version of his view designed to beat his critics back and expand the view in several ways. Pereboom's version of skepticism is called hard incompatibilism, according to which the type of free will necessary for moral responsibility of the basic desert-entailing kind is incompatible with determinism, and we lack any good reason to believe that its indeterministic conditions obtain. Consequently, many of our responsibility responses... are unjustified, and so ought rationally to be altered. Nevertheless, ... there are other attitudes and practices compatible with his skeptical conclusions that may take their place, and substituting them will contribute to our living in a better world and finding meaning in life. -- Pereboom is advocating a massive rewriting of human sensibility based on theoretical arguments that are, as he allows, not decisive. Now when it comes to harsh treatment of others, he may be right that the strength of his metaphysical arguments "provide[s] a sound moral reason to treat wrongdoers as if the skeptical position were true". But a "better safe than sorry" argument like this feels less gripping when applied to the sorts of positive treatment -- often flowing from loving relationships -- that are also ruled out to the extent they presuppose basic desert. Indeed, now it looks as if the argument may have more power in the other direction: to the extent these relationships are exceedingly valuable, render us vulnerable to a wide range of attitudes, and would take significant work to revise, "better safe than sorry" may counsel revisiting and rewriting the skeptical theoretical arguments, or at least their practical implications. There may thus be an asymmetrical payoff to revisionary metaphysics like Pereboom's, giving us reason to revise our practices only in the negative cases.
books  reviews  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  action-theory  free_will  accountability 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Horgan - Physicist George Ellis Knocks Physicists for Knocking Philosophy, Falsification, Free Will | Cross-Check, Scientific American Blog Network - July 2014
A native of South Africa, Ellis is professor emeritus at the U of Cape Town, where he taught for decades, and has also held positions at Cambridge, the U of Texas, the Fermi Institute and ...around the globe. He was an early critic of apartheid, and Mandela awarded him the Order of the Star of S.Africa. -- Horgan: At the conference where we met you were in a session called “The end of experiment.” What was that about? - Ellis: - many of the possible high-energy physics experiments and astronomy observations relevant to cosmology are now in essence nearly complete. Physics experiments are approaching the highest energies it will ever be possible to test by any collider experiment... We can’t build a collider bigger than the surface of the Earth. Thus our ability to test high energy physics – and hence structures on the smallest physical scales – is approaching its limits. Astronomical observations at all wavelengths are now probing the most distant cosmological events that will ever be “seeable” by any kinds of radiation whatever, because of visual horizons for each form of radiation. -- So what we can see at the largest and smallest scales is approaching what will ever be possible, except for refining the details. But I emphasize that this comment does not apply to complex systems. Complexity is almost unbounded – microbiology, biology, the brain will give us work to do for many centuries more, what we may find may be very unexpected. That might also apply to the foundations of quantum physics, and its relation to complexity. -- I concede that observations relevant to structure formation in the universe – galaxies, stars, planets – have a good while to go, they are in essence verging to the side of studying complexity, and still have life in them yet, they are very interesting studies.
physics  cosmology  astronomy  scientism  reductionism  complexity  metaphysics  creation  big_bang  free_will  philosophy_of_science  neuroscience  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rex Gilliland - What Becomes of the Human after Humanism? Heidegger and Derrida | Dartmouth College
We will consider Heidegger’s concept of the human being in the “Letter on ‘Humanism’” and Derrida’s reading of it in “The Ends of Man.” The “Letter on ‘Humanism’” is the first publication in which Heidegger extensively discusses the central themes of his later thought and is also the text that framed Heidegger’s reception in postwar France. In it, Heidegger critically examines the metaphysical foundation of humanism and develops a conception of the human being that attempts to think human decision in terms of its fundamental orientation toward being. Against humanists such as Sartre, Heidegger argues that being, not the human being, is of primary importance. At the same time, he maintains that the human being cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of being because being needs the human being to preserve its truth. We will consider Derrida’s response and his own views about the human being. In “The Ends of Man,” a nuanced reading of this text and the debate about humanism it helped to inspire, Derrida highlights the inadequacies of the interpretations of Heidegger found on both sides of the debate. However, Derrida also argues that there is a certain justification for these readings: Due to the fact that he privileges the human being and defines its essence via the proximity and presence of being, Heidegger fails to escape metaphysics. Does Derrida provide an alternate conception that avoids these difficulties? We will explore these questions by examining Derrida’s notions of undecidability and the relationship to an impossible presence: Is the extreme minimalism of Derrida’s position needed to disrupt the metaphysics of presence, or does it lead to a conception of the human being that is unnecessarily meager?
paper  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  Derrida  humanism  anti-humanism  post-WWII  human_nature  metaphysics  Being  determinism  free_will  responsibility  Sartre  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Unknowable Truths and Omniscience: A Reply to Kvanvig | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 553-566
The various attribute debates in analytical_philosophy tend to be piecemeal. They also often smuggle in positions on heavily debated issues such as free_will. Helpful pulling apart various threads of theism debates on attributes, determinism and theodicy -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  God-attributes  free_will  theodicy  cosmology  determinism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Frans Svensson - THE ROLE OF VIRTUE IN DESCARTES' ETHICAL THEORY, OR: WAS DESCARTES A VIRTUE ETHICIST? | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3 (JULY 2010), pp. 215-236
Looks useful 1st by trying to set criteria to distinguish virtue ethics from concern with virtue in other metaethics (deontology, consequentialism, eudaimonia) - he then looks at Descartes's letters to Queen Christina , supplemented with some remarks on moral psychology in Passions of the Soul. Contra Lisa Shapiro in a recent Blackwell Companion, his verdict is No. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  metaethics  virtue_ethics  virtue  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  good  reason  reason-passions  free_will  Descartes  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche's Philosophy of Action (2009) :: SSRN - in Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Action, 2010
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 270 -- Nietzsche holds that people lack freedom of the will in any sense that would be sufficient for ascriptions of moral responsibility; that the conscious experience we have of willing is actually epiphenomenal with respect to the actions that follow that experience; and that our actions largely arise through non-conscious processes (psychological and physiological) of which we are only dimly aware, and over which we exercise little or no conscious control. At the same time, Nietzsche, always a master of rhetoric, engages in a “persuasive definition” (Stevenson 1938) of the language of “freedom” and “free will,” to associate the positive valence of these terms with a certain Nietzschean ideal of the person unrelated to traditional notions of free will. -- No of Pages: 18 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, free will, moral responsibility, freedom, philosophy of action, epiphenomenalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  action-theory  Nietzsche  free_will  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  mind  consciousness  physiology  psychology  naturalism  responsibility  guilt  freedom  epiphenomenal  aesthetics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion [1779], ed. Mary Catherine Moran - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion, Corrected and Improved, in a Third Edition. Several Essays Added Concerning the Proof of a Deity, Edited and with an Introduction by Mary Catherine Moran (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1352> -- The Essays is commonly considered Kames’s most important philosophical work. In the first part, he sets forth the principles and foundations of morality and justice, attacking Hume’s moral skepticism and addressing the controversial issue of the freedom of human will. In the second part, Kames focuses on questions of metaphysics and epistemology to offer a natural theology in which the authority of the external senses is an important basis for belief in the Deity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  free_will  metaphysics  epistemology  epistemology-moral  scepticism  justice  virtue  Hume-ethics  natural_religion  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations [1737] with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull trans., eds. Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder - Online Library of Liberty
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations, with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull. Translated from the Latin by George Turnbull, edited with an Introduction by Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2305> -- The natural law theory of Johann Gottlieb Heineccius was one of the most influential to emerge from the early German Enlightenment. Heineccius continued and, in important respects, modified the ideas of his predecessors, Samuel Pufendorf and Christian Thomasius. He developed distinctive views on central questions such as the freedom of the human will and the natural foundation of moral obligation, which also sharply distinguished him from his contemporary Christian Wolff. The Liberty Fund edition is based on the translation by the Scottish moral philosopher George Turnbull (1698–1748). It includes Turnbull’s extensive comments on Heineccius’s text, as well as his substantial Discourse upon the Nature and Origin of Moral and Civil Laws. These elements make the work into one of the most extraordinary encounters between Protestant natural law theory and neo-republican civic humanism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Germany  Heineccius  Pufendorf  Thomasius  Wolff  Turnbull_George  natural_law  international_law  legal_theory  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  obligation  free_will  state-of-nature  government-forms  authority  legitimacy  natural_rights  natural_religion  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop - CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM | Pandaemonium Jan 2014
Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop -- ‘The characteristic of historical writing in recent centuries’, Siedentop observes, ‘is an inclination to minimize the moral and intellectual distance between the modern and the ancient world, while at the same time maximizing the moral and intellectual distance between modern Europe and the middle ages.’ I am not sure that it makes much sense to talk about a ‘characteristic of historical writing’ that stretches over ‘centuries’. This is particularly so given that one the characteristics of recent historiography has been the opposite: the tendency to blur the distinction between the Middle Ages and modernity. Inventing the Individual is very much part of this revisionist trend. The trouble is, in revising the previous approach Siedentop now makes the ancient world too alien and modernity not distinctive enough. -- at least it's a counter to the mournful Thomist condemnation of liberal individualism by MacIntyre, Taylor et al.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  political_philosophy  Christianity  liberalism  equality  free_will  original_sin  hierarchy  authority  individualism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 10]: SPINOZA’S ETHICS | Pandaemonium
C Chapter 11, which explores the ethical claims of Thomas Hobbes and Baruch Spinoza. The rise of the market economy and the growth of religious scepticism had, by the seventeenth century, corroded the ability of both God and community to warrant moral behaviour. Who or what could now authorize moral rules? This was the question now facing moral philosophers. One answer was revolutionary: humans could. Human nature, needs, desires, aspirations and possibilities would act as warrant for the moral good. But how human nature would play this role remained perplexing. -- Hobbes and Spinoza gave very different answers to this challenge, answers that were both to be highly influential. Hobbes helped launch a British tradition of moral philosophy; in his wake come Shaftesbury, Locke, Hume, Bentham and Mill. Spinoza helped shape what is now often called the ‘Continental’ tradition. Thinkers as diverse as Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche were all in his debt. The distinctions between the two traditions are often overplayed. Nevertheless, the ideas of Hobbes and Spinoza were to shape the way that the modern world came to look at the question of moral rules through the distinct answers they gave as to what should warrant moral behaviour. -- This extract is taken from the section on Spinoza’s Ethics.
intellectual_history  17thC  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  Spinoza  human_nature  moral_psychology  metaphysics  Descartes  mechanism  dualism  mind-body  necessity  free_will  change-social  continental_philosophy  Enlightenment  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Lisa Downing - Early Mod philosophy » 3:AM Magazine - May 2014
Lisa Downing is the philosopher who thinks all the time about the early modern philosophers of Europe, especially 17th and 18th century philosophy, about how philosophical analysis and historical exactitude compliment each other, on adding to the canonical philosophers of the period, on why Malebranch is the closest to re-entry, and Robert Boyle, on Descartes vs Newton, on avoiding anachronism, on the dynamism of the period, on primary and secondary qualities, on resisting the idea that historical views have to be relevant, on Berkeley, on tensions in Locke, on women philosophers of the time and on rejecting the occult. This one is kick-ass! Yo!
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  Locke  Boyle  Berkeley  Newton  Clarke  Leibniz  Hobbes  mind-body  causation  God-attributes  Providence  mechanism  substance  metaphysics  Aristotelian  qualia  perception  natural_philosophy  free_will  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne, texts translated from the Latin by Michael Silverthorne, introduction by James Moore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1723> Until the publication of this Liberty Fund edition, all but one of the works contained in Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind were available only in Latin. This milestone English translation will provide a general audience with insight into Hutcheson’s thought. In the words of the editors: “Hutcheson’s Latin texts in logic and metaphysics form an important part of his collected works. Published respectively in 1756 and, in its second edition, 1744, these works represent Hutcheson’s only systematic treatments of logic, ontology, and pneumatology, or the science of the soul. They were considered indispensable texts for the instruction of students in the eighteenth century.” -- the introduction is very useful -- pdf of LibFund typesetting
etexts  translation  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  education-higher  Hutcheson  logic  metaphysics  natural_law  human_nature  social_order  EF-add  books  Aristotelian  ontology  free_will  Stoicism  state-of-nature  sociability  moral_sentiments  ideas-theories  categories  soul  mind-body  Malebranche  More_Henry  downloaded 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Middle Knowledge [Molinism] - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
** Assumptions
** Scientia Media
** Objections to Middle Knowledge
** Rejection of Libertarian Freedom
** Libertarian Responses
** The Truth of Counterfactuals of Creaturely Freedom
** Objections to the Principle of Conditional Excluded Middle
** Molinist Responses
** Molinism and Determinism
** The Grounding Objection
** Molinist Responses
** The Usefulness of Middle Knowledge
** Viciously Circular
** Not True Soon Enough
** Molinist Responses
theology  theodicy  philosophy_of_religion  logic  modal_logic  God-attributes  free_will  Providence  Calvinist  Jesuits  Counter-Reformation  Genesis  creation_ex_nilho  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
William Lane Craig - Molinism vs. Calvinism | Reasonable Faith
Detailed explanation of where he differs with Reformed theologians, though both see themselves as generally following Westminster Confession
theology  theodicy  God-attributes  Providence  salvation  free_will  evil  Calvinist  Kirk  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Bishop, review - Peter Ulric Tse, Neural Basis of Free Will: Criterial Causation // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
Critical re reductionism or eliminativism underneath the Tse "persons choosing" lingo - one where equivocation on key notions such as willing, choosing, planning, valuing, information, assessment, and so forth, mask the replacements of what persons do when they engage in decisions by mechanized response to inputs. The richness of our human experience and practices of free will and action disappear. Equivocating on key terms such as 'assessing', 'deciding' and 'willing' likely would go unnoticed if you are presupposing a strictly instrumental view of action, where all cause-effect chains are modeled on efficient causation, and the main idea is to discern the most efficient or effective means for achieving a pre-set goal. -- On the instrumental view Tse offers, human actions are the effects of efficient causal chains no different in kind from a thermostat triggering the A/C to come on when a preset threshold is met (except that somehow the thermostat has an unidentified power to change the threshold once the threshold has been met). Tse likely does not realize that his being enmeshed in an instrumental view of action leads him to personify neurons and thereby mechanize assessing, deciding and willing, among other activities, at all levels of his account. -- Moreover, Tse likely does not realize how deeply the instrumental view of action is shaped by Western cultural ideals (Bishop 2013). -- In conclusion, Tse tells us that he is going to give us a neuroscientific account of free will and consciousness, but his metaphysics of realization, the personification equivocation and the commitment to an instrumental picture of action amounts to a philosophical account with philosophical assumptions... -- interesting on Causal Closure Principle of physics
books  reviews  philosophy_of_science  mind  neuroscience  free_will  determinism  reductionism  physicalism  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson (eds.), Nietzsche, Naturalism and Normativity // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This volume comprises nine new essays, primarily on various topics in Nietzsche's ethics, especially his critique of morality, meta-ethics and moral psychology; only one essay primarily concerns the meaning of "naturalism." The contributors include, besides the editors, several well-known figures in Anglophone Nietzsche studies: R. Lanier Anderson, Nadeem Hussain, Peter Poellner, Bernard Reginster, and Richard Schacht. Of perhaps special interest is that the volume features two essays by well-known moral philosophers, Peter Railton and Alan Thomas, neither of whom has written on Nietzsche previously. Almost all the essays (with an exception to be noted) are written to a high standard of scholarly care and philosophical argumentation, and can be read profitably by philosophers not primarily interested in Nietzsche. The volume as a whole is essential for Nietzsche scholars, and some of the essays will interest moral philosophers more generally.

The essays can be grouped into three main areas. First, when Nietzsche critiques morality, what is his target and how can his critique (and his naturalism) be squared with his own evaluative views (Railton, Simon Robertson)? Call this, following my terminology (Leiter 2002: 74-77, which Robertson explicitly adopts), "the Scope Problem." Second, several essays (Hussain, Poellner, Thomas) address metaethical questions, in particular, what the metaphysical and semantic status and character of Nietzsche's own evaluative judgments are supposed to be. Third, three other authors (Anderson, Christopher Janaway, Reginster) examine aspects of Nietzsche's moral psychology, particularly his conception of human agency, motivation, and the self. Finally, Schacht is the only author to focus exclusively on the question of what Nietzsche's naturalism amounts to; unfortunately, his is the weakest essay in the volume.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  naturalism  free_will  agency  self  values  normativity  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christopher Janaway, Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's Genealogy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // (2007)
.. this intelligent and illuminating book, which aims to defend two rather precise theses about reading Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality: first, that Nietzsche's method of writing is intended to engage the reader emotionally or affectively; and second, that such affective engagement is a necessary precondition for altering the reader's views about evaluative questions -- that "without the rhetorical provocations, without the revelation of what we find gruesome, shaming, embarrassing, comforting, and heart-warming we would neither comprehend nor be able to revalue our current values". -- Janaway and I are farther apart with respect to Nietzsche's conception of human agency and freedom. Janaway takes the passage on "the sovereign individual" (GM II:2) as giving expression to Nietzsche's "positive conception of free will" as "involv[ing] acting fully within one's character, knowing its limits and capabilities, and valuing oneself for what one is rather than for one's conformity to an external standard or to what one ought to be". It seems to me a mistake, however, to read this passage as articulating a kind of ideal of agency or selfhood; in context, I think it is far more plausible to understand the passage as being wholly ironic and mocking. -- very useful re Leiter view of both Hume and Nietzsche's "science of man" based on "speculative naturalism"
books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  Hume  naturalism  science_of_man  moral_psychology  free_will  causation  agency  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Lee MacLean, The Free Animal: Rousseau on Free Will and Human Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
Two interpretive questions guide MacLean's study: first, whether Rousseau's ascription of free will to humans, especially in the Second Discourse, is to be taken at face value (rather than as part of an esoteric strategy to hide his "true" view from the masses); and second, what implications the ascription or non-ascription of free will has for interpreting his moral and political thought. -- most of book on No. 1, to counter Straussians esoteric reading -- The textual arguments offered here are deft and attentive to nuance, and, unlike most treatments of Rousseau by philosophers, they cover not only his three central philosophical texts, but also less studied works such as Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Chapter 3 contains one of the best extended treatments of Emile's "Savoyard Vicar" that I have read. -- Especially intriguing is the suggestion that the religious views expressed by the Vicar are to be read as playing a crucial role in The Social Contract's argument that a legitimate republic requires a civil religion. -- She demonstrates a sure and confident grasp of Rousseau's texts, including unpublished material. Even more impressive, she knows a surprising amount about the views of Rousseau's contemporaries and predecessors on the topic of free will - Buffon, Montaigne, and Condillac, for example - and she very helpfully brings this knowledge to bear on her carefully constructed interpretations of Rousseau. For this reason her book is a must-read for scholars interested in the historical context within which Rousseau's views develop.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  18thC  Rousseau  free_will  self-love  self-interest  civil_religion  social_contract  Buffon  Condillac  Montaigne  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall - Stewart Home’s po-mo homer » 3:AM Magazine
As much an essay on post Kantian (and post Hegelian) German philosophy -- Marxism, materialism, phenomenology hermeneutics, post Kantian, structuralist, poststructuralist, especially Nietzsche and Heidegger -- as on an album of readings of his work by Home. And a further riff on epistemology and varieties of scepticism, including a sort of take on Pyrrhonism as not an extreme version of scepticism. Heidegger's misreading of Nietzsche is of a piece with his embrace of the fascist side of Plato, which was part of Nietzsche's rejection of even the non Socratic Plato. Further long riff on Beiser rejection of Kantian aesthetics in Diotima's Children and the lack of aesthetic criteria after the avant_guard. Home attacks the shallow art world from another direction - mostly as a bourgeois status game.
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  fate  free_will  gods-antiquity  ancient_religions  myth  tragedy  Nietzsche  Heidegger  epistemology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Homer  pre-Socratics  aesthetics  Kant-aesthetics  avant_guard  materialism  Marxist  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Keim Campbell - Issue intro: New Essays on the Metaphysics of Moral Responsibility | JSTOR: The Journal of Ethics, Vol. 12, No. 3/4 (2008), pp. 193-201
This is the introduction to a volume of new essays in the metaphysics of moral responsibility by John Martin Fischer, Carl Ginet, Ishtiyaque Haji, Alfred R. Mele, Derk Pereboom, Paul Russell, and Peter van Inwagen. I provide some background for the essays, cover the main debates in the metaphysics of moral responsibility, and emphasize some of the authors' contributions to this area of philosophy. - didn't download
journal  article  jstor  moral_philosophy  metaethics  metaphysics  free_will  responsibility  human_nature  action-theory  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Claudia Blöser, Aron Schöpf and Marcus Willaschek - Autonomy, Experience, and Reflection. On a Neglected Aspect of Personal Autonomy | JSTOR: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Vol. 13, No. 3 (June 2010), pp. 239-253
The aim of this paper is to suggest that a necessary condition of autonomy has not been sufficiently recognized in the literature: the capacity to critically reflect on one's practical attitudes (desires, preferences, values, etc.) in the light of new experiences. It will be argued that most prominent accounts of autonomy—ahistorical as well as historysensitive—have either altogether failed to recognize this condition or at least failed to give an explicit account of it. -- discusses internalist (Frankfurt's "free_will" 1st and 2nd order desires that involves critical reflection; ahistorical, Taylor's "punctuated"?) and externalist (adds conditions of information not just psychology in determining values) - this paper adds ability to reflect on values and experience going forward when new experience doesn't fit with expectations from existing values --focus is on practical judgment without extending into a particular view of moral philosophy etc though points out where theorists in other areas have used a narrower notion of autonomy --bibliography may be useful eg Rawls -- didn't download
article  jstor  human_nature  free_will  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  autonomy  practical_reason  values  development-personal  bibliography  Taylor_Charles  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
George Soros - Fallibility, reflexivity, and the human uncertainty principle - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
Lead article for special issue devoted to Soros and epistemology in social sciences more broadly compared with natural sciences and Popper's version of falsibility in scientific method -- He's making progress in formalizing his theory and putting it in context of other theorists - sees his fallibility and reflexivity combination as major factor in "Knightian uncertainty" - Downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  scientific_method  falsification  deduction  Popper  Soros  uncertainty  economic_theory  economic_models  financial_economics  capital_markets  FX  EMH  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  complexity  equilibrium  reflexivity  ontology-social  free_will  financial_crisis  financial_system  fallibility  downloaded  EF-add  fundamentals  methodology  cognition  agency  intentionality 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Innocence of Becoming by Brian Leiter :: SSRN - Oct 2013
I offer an interpretation of Nietzsche’s striking idea of “the innocence of becoming” (die Unschuld des Werdens), and offer a partial defense of its import, namely, that no one is ever morally responsible or guilty for what they do and that the so-called “reactive attitudes” are always misplaced. I focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the arguments as set out in Twilight of the Idols. First, there is Nietzsche’s hypothesis, partly psychological and partly historical or anthropological, that the ideas of “free” action or free will, and of responsibility for actions freely chosen or willed, were introduced primarily in order to justify punishment (“[m]en were considered ‘free’ so that they might be judged and punished”). Call this the Genetic Thesis about Free Will. Second, there is Nietzsche’s claim that the moral psychology, or “psychology of the will” as he calls it, that underlies this picture is, in fact, false — that, in fact, it is not true that every action is willed or that it reflects a purpose or that it originates in consciousness. Call these, in aggregate, the Descriptive Thesis about the Will. (Here I draw on earlier work.) Finally, there is articulation of a programmatic agenda, namely, to restore the “innocence of becoming” by getting rid of guilt and punishment based on guilt — not primarily because ascriptions of guilt and responsibility are false (though they are), but because a world understood as “innocent,” one understood in terms of “natural” cause and effect, is a better world in which to live. I thus try to explain and defend Zarathustra’s recommendation: “Enemy’ you shall say, but not villain; sick you shall say, but not scoundrel; fool you shall say, but not sinner.” Nietzsche’s views are contrasted with those of important modern writers on these topics, including P.F. Strawson and Gary Watson. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  morality-Christian  accountability  moral_psychology  free_will  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols by Brian Leiter :: SSRN
Leiter, Brian, Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols (October 27, 2013). Topoi (Forthcoming). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2345957 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2345957 -- This review essay of Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Idols" (1888) is part of the journal TOPOI's "Untimely Reviews" series of classic works of philosophy. The journal explains the idea of the series this way: "We take a classic of philosophy and ask an outstanding scholar in the same field to review it as if it had just been published. This implies that the classical work must be contrasted with both past and current literature and must be framed in the wider cultural context of the present day. The result is a litmus test for the work itself: Failure in accounting for relevant issues raised by contemporary literature reveals that, in those respects, our classic has indeed been outpaced by later works. On the other hand, any success in capturing core topics of current discussion, or even anticipating and clarifying issues not yet well brought into focus by contemporary scholars, is the strongest proof of the liveliness of the work, no matter how long ago it was written." -- This essay tries to discharge the task for Nietzsche's TWILIGHT. Themes dealt with are Nietzsche's attacks on morality, on free will, on mental causation, on Socrates, and on Kant. Connections are drawn with contemporary work by Mark Johnston, David Rosenthal, and Daniel Wagner, among others. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  free_will  morality-Nietzche  Plato  Kant  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Millican - Hume, Causal Realism, and Causal Science | JSTOR: Mind, New Series, Vol. 118, No. 471 (Jul., 2009), pp. 647-712
The 'New Hume' interpretation, which sees Hume as a realist about 'thick' Causal powers, has been largely motivated by his evident commitment to causal language and causal science. In this, however, it is fundamentally misguided, failing to recognise how Hume exploits his anti-realist conclusions about (upper-case) Causation precisely to support (lower-case) causal science. When critically examined, none of the standard New Humean arguments—familiar from the work of Wright, Craig, Strawson, Buckle, Kail, and others—retains any significant force against the plain evidence of Hume's texts. But the most devastating objection comes from Hume's own applications of his analysis of causation, to the questions of 'the immateriality of the soul' and 'liberty and necessity'. These show that the New Hume interpretation has misunderstood the entire purpose of his 'Chief Argument', and presented him as advocating some of the very positions he is arguing most strongly against. -- paywall Oxford Journals 7 years until jstor
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  causation  scepticism  soul  free_will  determinism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 3]: ON STOICISM, FREE WILL & FATE | Pandaemonium April 2011
Nice summary of the Stoic origins of the theodicy, fate,beneficent Providence, and free will tangle - distinction between free will as responsibility and as agency in sense of changing the world - difference in approach to virtue and material condition from Aristotle's aristocratic approach - poor or slave as potentially virtuous
intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Stoicism  fate  Providence  determinism  free_will  slavery  elites  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Roy F. Baumeister - Do You Really Have Free Will? Of course. Here’s how it evolved. | Slate Sept 2013
Lots of links re silliness that's either mostly semantics or the worst sorts of reductionism that gleefully embraces impoverished materialism.
free_will  neuroscience  mind  mind-body  scientism  links  evolution  evolutionary_biology 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sharon R. Krause : Two Concepts of Liberty in Montesquieu (2005) |T & F Online
Perspectives on Political Science, Volume 34, Issue 2, 2005, pages 88- 96, Available online: 07 Aug 2010, DOI: 10.3200/PPSC.34.2.88-96 -- political liberty (against abuse of government) and philosophical liberty (or freedom of will) -- Krause argues that, contra the deterministic reading of Montesquieu, philosophic liberty is important to him and how to make it work with political liberty
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  liberty  despotism  free_will  determinism  Montesquieu  natural_law  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: France Marchal - Nature et liberté chez Diderot après l'Encyclopédie by Gerhardt Stenger
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 95e Année, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1995), p. 326 - just half a page review -- downloaded pdf to Note -- praised for getting complexity and pluralism of Diderot whose materialism isn't fatalistic - "liberté" is an empty bit of metaphysics - for Diderot it's"libre" within an unfolding nature
books  reviews  jstor  find  18thC  intellectual_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Diderot  nature  liberty  free_will  materialism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
C. P. Ragland review: Andrea Christofidou, Self, Reason, and Freedom: A New Light on Descartes' Metaphysics // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2013
For a long time, Anglophone commentators on Descartes' Meditations gave the Fourth Meditation short shrift, but in the last fifteen years or so, it has increasingly piqued their interest. Exemplifying that trend, Christofidou studies the entire Meditations in light of concepts central to the Fourth. She presents Descartes' method of doubt as a "self-administered" form of "Socratic . . . elenchus" (8) in which the meditator seeks truth by rejecting all authorities but that of Reason. Because employing the method is a free exercise of active will, freedom is at the heart of Descartes' project.As someone who has thought long and hard about Descartes' conception of freedom, I found Christofidou's central contention both accurate and exciting. I also agree completely with her characterization of Descartes as fundamentally a seeker after metaphysical and physical truth -- understood as correspondence of thought with reality -- rather than as an epistemologist or a proto-idealist. Nevertheless, the book frustrated me, probably because of the way it is "pitched".
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  free_will  God-existence  epistemology  metaphysics  dualism  substance  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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