dunnettreader + family   34

RB Outhwaite - The Rise and Fall of the English Ecclesiastical Courts, 1500–1860 (2007) | Cambridge University Press
The first history of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in England that covers the period up to the removal of principal subjects inherited from the Middle Ages. Probate, marriage and divorce, tithes, defamation, and disciplinary prosecutions involving the laity are all covered. All disappeared from the church's courts during the mid-nineteenth century, and were taken over by the royal courts. The book traces the steps and reasons - large and small - by which this occurred.
Downloaded 1st 10 pgs Ch 1 via Air
1. The ecclesiastical courts: structures and procedures
2. The business of the courts, 1500–1640
3. Tithe causes
4. Wills and testamentary causes
5. Defamation
6. Matrimonial litigation and marriage licenses
7. Office causes
8. The roots of expansion and critical voices
9. Charting decline, 1640–1830
10. Explaining decline
11. The Bills of 1733–1734
12. Snips and repairs: small steps to reform, 1753–1813
13. Royal commissions and early fruits, 1815–1832
14. Reform frustrated
15. Reforms thick and fast, 1854–1860.
books  downloaded  legal_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Church_of_England  legal_system  church_courts  religion-established  family  marriage  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  inheritance  property  trusts  dispute_resolution  reform-social  reform-legal  morality-Christian  local_government  local_politics  discipline  punishment  authority  hierarchy  governing_class  governance-church  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Joanne Bailey - Unquiet Lives: Marriage and Marriage Breakdown in England, 1660–1800 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
Drawing upon vivid court records and newspaper advertisements, this study challenges traditional views of married life in 18thC England. It reveals husbands' and wives' expectations and experiences of marriage to expose the extent of co-dependency between spouses. The book, therefore, presents a new picture of power in marriage and the household. It also demonstrates how attitudes towards adultery and domestic violence evolved during this period, influenced by profound shifts in cultural attitudes about sexuality and violence.
- An unusually detailed model of married life in the eighteenth century, which stresses co-dependency between husband and wife
- Charts thinking towards violence and adultery in the eighteenth century, focusing as much on men's needs and dependence as on those of women
1. Introduction: assessing marriage
2. 'To have and to hold': analysing married life
3. 'For better, for worse': resolving marital difficulties
4. 'An honourable estate': marital roles in the household
5. 'With all my worldly goods I thee endow': spouses' contributions and possessions within marriage
6. 'Wilt thou obey him and serve him': the marital power balance
7. 'Forsaking all other': marital chastity
8. 'Till death us do part': life after a failed marriage
9. 'Mutual society, help and comfort': conclusion
downloaded intro via AIR
books  downloaded  17thC  18thC  British_history  social_theory  gender_history  cultural_history  sex  chastity  adultery  marriage  family  property_rights  women-legal_status  authority  patriarchy  gender  identity  masculinity  femininity  violence  judiciary  Church_of_England  inheritance  children  church_courts  reform-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Seminar 1 of 6 - Hegel's Origination of Property, the Family and the State (2013) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
German Philosophy Seminars - Hegel's Origination of Property, the Family and the State. Texts and Critique
Seminar 1: General Introduction: Hegel's Metaphysics, and the Place of the Family in Hegel's Philosophy of 'Geist'
Each seminar will begin with an introductory commentary, and be followed by a close reading of a short text. Texts will be provided in German and English in PDF format, and will normally be a maximum of 15 pages (often much shorter), chosen from: the Logik of 1832; System der Sittlichkeit (System of Ethical Life); sections of the third of the Jenaer Systementwürfe; the Phänomenologie des Geistes; and the Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts (Elements of the Philosophy of Right). Knowledge of German is not essential to attend the seminars, but texts and key terms will be discussed in German and English.
Schedule downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
family  women  intellectual_history  family_law  courses  political_philosophy  19thC  property_rights  German_Idealism  video  Hegel  property  social_theory  Germany 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Monetary history - rural finance in northwest Europe from c 1400 | Real-World Economics Review Blog
a) Since at least 1400 rural lending and borrowing was at least in some regions common and tied to the life cycle of households and families, which (though…
Instapaper  economic_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  financial_innovation  rural  Netherlands  agriculture  family  inheritance  marriage  households  collateral  banking  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack Balkin - Obergefell and Tradition | Balkinization - June 2015
It is tempting to identify the dissenters with Burke, and view Kennedy as opposed to Burkeanism. Certainly the dissenters would like to brand Kennedy as a revolutionary or Jacobin, heedlessly destroying a valued institution at the center of society. But this is a caricature of what Kennedy is actually doing in his opinion. Kennedy's use of tradition is also Burkean in its own way. He simply emphasizes different features of Burke's thought. In particular Kennedy emphasizes change through respect for tradition that results from discussion and lived experience--as opposed to change that occurs through violence and revolutionary upheaval. Kennedy emphasizes the natural evolution and growth of previous commitments through debate, contestation and social practice. Our commitments evolve as they we apply them to changed factual circumstances and our wisdom grows through encountering those changed circumstances in practical terms. We can have greater confidence in our judgments achieved in this way because, unlike previous generations, we have the benefit of their experience, while they do not have the benefit of ours.
Instapaper  US_constitution  SCOTUS  constitutional_law  tradition  Burke  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  rights-legal  legal_reasoning  marriage  family  family_law  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - An Anthropological Approach to Gay Marriage | The American Conservative - April 2015
This is an absolutely superb post, pointing out the universal logic across cultures to establish default rules for managing the key elements of family law shared across nuclear and extended families which the society has an interest in ensuring are dealt with in a regular rather than ad hoc fashion -- reproduction of the society through the production of children and their upbringing and material survival, and property relations, especially inheritance. He uses the Old Testament, and the shifts in rules as the culture developed (marrying the widow of one’s brother to ensure that the brother had an inheritance line within the family, which "law" has obviously been relaxed or abandoned as the clan or extended family ceased to be the organizing structure for families and property), as well as common practices (implicit rules) when the standard pattern of relations wasn't working (the patriarchs using concubines to produce heirs when their wives were barren). He also gives the example in Kenya of an unmarried older woman with no children who marries a younger woman, serves as the 'husband" in the marriage, and the younger woman uses men to get pregnant and "bear the children of the all-female family" who will inherit the "husband's" property. The contemporary state in the US has an interest in providing default rules for marriage, family formation and child care, and property relations including inheritance -- and since WE HAVE same-sex marriages that present exactly the same legal issues, the state has an interest in extending its default rules to those arrangements.
politics-and-religion  family  property  inheritance  marriage  US_legal_system  SCOTUS  Old_Testament  religion-fundamentalism  Biblical_authority  religious_culture  culture_wars  homosexuality  civil_liberties  gender_history  gender-and-religion  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Anthony Favier - Catholics and gender - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French version 2014)
Translated by Kate McNaughton -- Tags : catholicism | gender | homosexuality | marriage | education | feminism -- The criticism of “gender theory” that is expressed in some Catholic circles is not just a travesty of gender studies: it detracts from the development of a feminist theology and current efforts at establishing a dialogue within the Catholic Church -- tracks the history of hysterical anti-feminism and anti gender studies wrapped up with counter-revolution post Vatican II -- studying "gender" as a social and cultural phenomenon became the boogeyman for Catholic focus on the threats of liberal modernity to "Catholic anthropology" -- the hot button issues of reproductive rights, women in positions in the Church, and acknowledgement of homosexuality and gay marriage. After decades of overt hostile opposition, the French Church is sending out a new generation of Jesuit scholars to start distinguishing between the realities of cultural bases of gender vs the "extreme ideology" that has been labeled "gender theory." A 2014 statement on family by French bishops acknowledges much of "gender studies" as common sense, FREX how inequalities of power are implicated in many gender-defined social roles -- which they distinguish from rabid gender ideology. -- saved to Instapaper
20thC  21stC  Catholics  France  feminism  homosexuality  gender  Papacy  Vatican_II  ecclesiology  politics-and-religion  family  civil_liberties  equality  Jesuits  culture_wars  cultural_change  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patriarcha, or the Natural Power of Kings - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha; of the Natural Power of Kings. By the Learned Sir Robert Filmer Baronet (London: Richard Chiswell, 1680). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/221> -- In the aftermath of the English Revolution which saw the execution of a king and the creation of a Commonwealth and the restoration of the monarchy, Filmer wrote a solid defense of the divine right of kings which in turn prompted John Locke to write a riposte – part 1 of the Two Treatises of Government. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  monarchy  Absolutism  hierarchy  social_order  family  authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  divine_right  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  English_Civil_War  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  political_press  Tories  High_Church  resistance_theory  Locke-1st_Treatise  Tyrrell  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks [1771], ed. Aaron Garrett - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks; or, An Inquiry into the Circumstances which give rise to Influence and Authority in the Different Members of Society, edited and with an Introduction by Aaron Garrett (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/287> -- The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks is one of the major products of the Scottish Enlightenment and a masterpiece of jurisprudence and social theory. Millar developed a progressive account of the nature of authority in society by analyzing changes in subsistence, agriculture, arts, and manufacture. The book is perhaps the most precise and compact development of the abiding themes of the liberal wing of the Scottish Enlightenment. Drawing on Smith’s four-stages theory of history and the natural law’s traditional division of domestic duties into those toward servants, children, and women, Millar provides a rich historical analysis of the ways in which progressive economic change transforms the nature of authority. In particular, he argues that, with the progress of arts and manufacture, authority tends to become less violent and concentrated, and ranks tend to diversify. Millar’s analysis of this historical progress is nuanced and sophisticated; for example, his discussion of servants is perhaps the best developed of the “economic” arguments against slavery. -- 1st edition 1771 - he published 2 more in his lifetime, the latest edition being more "scientific", e.g. removing some references that were less reliable, more speculative, or not in keeping with a more sober tone -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  stadial_theories  social_order  social_sciences  social_process  change-social  political_economy  art_history  literary_history  civilizing_process  civil_society  family  authority  hierarchy  commerce  industry  trade  progress  slavery  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - The Stupidest Thing I Have Ever Read | Slacktavist June 2014
-- This is from Religion Dispatches, by Patricia Miller titled, “The Story Behind the Catholic Church’s Stunning Reversal on Contraception” -- Here’s Miller: "The [papal] commission voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the ban against artificial means of birth control be lifted. -- Unhappy with the direction of the commission, the Vatican packed the last commission meetings with 15. But even the bishops voted 9 to 3 (3 abstained) to change the teaching, -- Despite the commission’s years of work and theologically unassailable conclusion that the church’s teaching on birth control was neither infallible nor irreversible, Pope Paul VI stunned the world on July 29, 1968, when he reaffirmed the church’s ban on modern contraceptives in Humanae Vitae. -- The pope had deferred to a minority report prepared by 4 conservative theologian priests that said the church could not change its teaching on birth control because admitting the church had been wrong about the issue for centuries would raise questions about the moral authority of the pope, especially on matters of sexuality, and the belief that the Holy Spirit guided his pronouncements. “The Church cannot change her answer because this answer is true. … It is true because the Catholic Church, instituted by Christ … could not have so wrongly erred during all those centuries of its history,” they wrote. As one of the conservative theologians famously asked one of the female members of the commission, what would happen to “the millions we have sent to hell” for using contraception if the teaching were suddenly changed.
religious_history  church_history  Catholics  Papacy  papal_infallibility  20thC  sexuality  feminism  patriarchy  women-work  women-rights  family  authority  tradition  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Isabel Karremann and Anja Müller, eds. - Mediating Identities in Eighteenth-Century England (2011) | Ashgate
This volume engages in a critical discussion of the connection between historically specific categories of identity determined by class, gender, nationality, religion, political factions and age, and the media available at the time, including novels, newspapers, trial reports, images and the theatre. Recognizing the proliferation of identities in the epoch, these essays explore the ways in which different media determined constructions of identity and were in turn shaped by them. *--* Introduction: mediating identities in 18th-century England, Isabel Karremann; *--* Identifying an age-specific English literature for children, Anja Müller; *--* Found and lost in mediation: manly identity in Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, Isabel Karremann; *--* Gender identity in sentimental and pornographic fiction: Pamela and Fanny Hill, Franz Meier; *--* Paratexts and the construction of author identities: the preface as threshold and thresholds in the preface, Katharina Rennhak; *--* Owning identity: the 18th-century actress and theatrical property, Felicity Nussbaum; *--* Constructing identity in 18th-century comedy: schools of scandal, observation and performance, Anette Pankratz; *--* Material sites of discourse and the discursive hybridity of identities, Uwe Böker; *--* Constructions of political identity: the example of impeachments, Anna-Christina Giovanopoulos; *--* The public sphere, mass media, fashion and the identity of the individual, Christian Huck; *--* Topography and aesthetics: mapping the British identity in painting, Isabelle Baudino; *--* The panoramic gaze: the control of illusion and the illusion of control, Michael Meyer; *--* Peripatetics of citizenship in the 1790s, Christoph Houswitschka; *--* Critical responses, Rainer Emig, Hans-Peter Wagner and Christoph Heyl - downloaded introduction to Note
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  politics-and-literature  English_lit  literary_history  novels  theater  theatre-Restoration  gender  masculinity  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  impeachment  Somers  Harley  public_sphere  Habermas  aesthetics  consumers  children  family  citizenship  national_ID  identity  identity_politics  Defoe  comedy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC and Introduction, Nicholas Rogers - Making the English Middle Class, ca. 1700-1850 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4, Oct., 1993
Introduction (pp. 299-304) Nicholas Rogers [downloaded] *--* (1) "A Just and Profitable Commerce": Moral Economy and the Middle Classes in 18thC London (pp. 305-332) Susan E. Brown [questions "aristocratic century" - independent merchants and bourgeoisie in leading charities, urban politics, polite culture etc. Didn't fit a consistent deference pattern; members of middle class could be on all sides of Poor Laws, so Thompson's bipolar moral economy overstates lack of variation in middle and intermediary functions, especially when drawing on civic traditions that didn't depend on aristocracy leadership] *--* (2) Racism, Imperialism, and the Traveler's Gaze in 18thC England (pp. 333-357) Margaret Hunt [unenlightened middle class elements eg freemasonry could be as xenophobic as cosmopolitan; attention to racial, ethnic difference could also be used to stigmatise the poor and set middle class apart] *--* (3) The Masonic Moment; Or, Ritual, Replica, and Credit: John Wilkes, the Macaroni Parson, and the Making of the Middle-Class Mind (pp. 358-395) John Money. *--* (4) "Middle-Class" Domesticity Goes Public: Gender, Class, and Politics from Queen Caroline to Queen Victoria (pp. 396-432) Dror Wahrman [middle class as defenders of family, domesticity, separate spheres only after won political status in 1832 - nobody adopted Hannah More's vision until decades later - use of the term by others or as self identifier is all over the map, even in the same report or work, stabilizing only c 1830s] -- downloaded Rogers pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  urbanization  urban_politics  urban_elites  middle_class  aristocracy  politeness  consumerism  travel  xenophobia  racism  poverty  Poor_Laws  merchants  mercantilism  commercial_interest  interest_groups  corporatism  free_trade  Freemasonry  gender  family  domesticity  moral_economy  creditors  debtors  dissenters  local_government  political_nation  oligarchy  Parliament  anti-Jacobin  Loyalists  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  imperialism  London  status  rank  nouveaux_riches  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gilles Duranton, Andrés Rodríguez-Pose and Richard Sandall - Family Types and the Persistence of Regional Disparities in Europe | JSTOR: Economic Geography, Vol. 85, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 23-47
Paywall - see jstor for extensive references -- This article examines the association between one of the most basic institutional forms, the family, and a series of demographic, educational, social, and economic indicators across regions in Europe. Using Emmanuel Todd's classification of medieval European family systems, we identify potential links between family types and regional disparities in household size, educational attainment, social capital, labor participation, sectoral structure, wealth, and inequality. The results indicate that medieval family structures seem to have influenced European regional disparities in virtually every indicator that we considered. That these links remain, despite the influence of the modern state and population migration, suggests that such structures are either extremely resilient or in the past were internalized within other social and economic institutions as they developed.
article  jstor  paywall  economic_history  social_history  family  Medieval  economic_growth  economic_sociology  development  institutions  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Emma Griffin: A conundrum resolved? Courtship, marriage and the growth of population in eighteenth-century England. | Emma Griffin - Academia.edu
A cultural shift in marriage norms over the long 18thC has to be placed at the fore of explaining the downward shift in marriage age - earlier focus on economic explanation that economic growth allowed the earlier establishment of independent households leaves out the erosion of ability of communities to police marriage norms as economic mobility increased and competing norms or freedom to pursue individual preferences emerged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  social_history  economic_history  cultural_history  demography  18thC  Britain  marriage  population  family  Industrial_Revolution  mobility  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: Dan Beaver - Religion, Politics, and Society in Early Modern England: A Problem of Classification (1994)
JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Jul., 1994), pp. 314-322 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Politics of Religion in Restoration England by Tim Harris; Paul Seaward; Mark Goldie; --**-- The Family in the English Revolution by Christopher Durston;  --**-- Death, Ritual, and Bereavement by Ralph Houlbrooke;  --**-- Sin and Society in the Seventeenth Century by John Addy
books  reviews  historiography  religious_history  political_history  church_history  social_history  political_culture  cultural_history  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Church_of_England  dissenters  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  family  population  local_government  provinces  reformation_of_manners  sin  judiciary  Puritans  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Lamb: Chapter 3, Inheritance and bequest in Lockean rights theory | Book (2012) Guido Erreygers, John Cunliffe eds, Inherited Wealth, Justice and Equality - Google Books
Lamb starts chapter with descrption of contemporary libertarian theorists (right Nozivk & left) who ignore how Locke's theology provides framework and continuous web for his thoughts to fit together. Book available for obscene price on Kindle
chapter  intellectual_history  political_economy  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  property  inheritance  family  Locke  17thC  18thC  Britain  social_history  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Aristotelianism of Locke's Politics (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-257 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Locke takes up Aristotle attack in Plato mixing political with family power, which Filmer adopts
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  political_philosophy  Locke  Filmer  patriarchy  family  power  Aristotle  Plato  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael O’Malley : Free Silver and the Constitution of Man | Common-place April 2006
Michael O’Malley is associate professor of history and art history at George Mason University. He is studying the money question in American history, as well as studying the history of recorded sound..... The money debate and immigration at the turn of the century.....In 1889, Harvard economist Francis A. Walker described the "social effects of paper money" that ranged from bad taste—"wanton bravery of apparel and equipage"—to dangerous consumer desires, which undermined the father’s authority. Paper money, Walker observed, led to the "the creation of a countless host of artificial necessities in the family beyond the power of the husband and Father to supply without a resort to questionable devices or reckless speculations." Not only driven to recklessness, these fathers adopted "humiliating imitations of foreign habits of living." Paper money undermined "that fit and natural leadership of taste and fashion which is the best protection society can have against sordid material aims." And it elicited "manners at once gross and effeminate," which led to "democracy without equality or fraternity, and exclusiveness without pride or character." Paper money threatened patriarchy; it drove otherwise respectable men to immoral or dangerous speculations. Paper bills produced both "effeminacy" and coarseness, encouraging foreign habits. How did paper money manage this cultural crime spree? Not by raising prices—in this passage Walker never mentions higher prices. Instead, by removing society from a basis in "real values," paper money overturned natural laws and natural social hierarchies. It decentered the self.
19thC  US_history  economic_history  cultural_history  social_history  patriarchy  masculinity  family  money  monetary_policy  currency  hierarchy  status  migration  racialism  democracy  reformation_of_manners  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Women and Property in Early Modern England by Amy Louise Erickson (1995). | Questia
This ground-breaking book reveals the economic reality of ordinary women between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. Drawing on little-known sources, Amy Louise Erickson reconstructs day-to-day lives, showing how women owned, managed and inherited property on a scale previously unrecognised. Her complex and fascinating research, which contrasts the written laws with the actual practice, completely revises the traditional picture of women's economic status in pre-industrial England. Women and Property is essential reading for anyone interested in women, law and the past.
books  Questia  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  legal_history  cultural_history  women  property  inheritance  marriage  family  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1680s  Absolutism  Academia.edu  access_to_services  adultery  aesthetics  agriculture  American_Revolution  anti-Catholic  anti-Jacobin  architecture  aristocracy  Aristotle  article  art_history  authority  banking  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  Bodin  Bolingbroke  books  bookshelf  Britain  British_history  British_politics  Brydges  Burke  canon_law  casuistry  Catholics  centralization  central_government  change-social  chapter  charity  Charles_I  Charles_II  chastity  children  church_courts  church_history  Church_of_England  citizenship  civilizing_process  civil_liberties  civil_society  civil_wars  clientelism  climate  collateral  colonialism  comedy  commerce  commercial_interest  commonwealth  constitutional_law  consumerism  consumers  corporations  corporatism  country_house  courses  courtiers  court_culture  creditors  cultural_change  cultural_history  culture_wars  currency  custom  customary_law  debt  debtors  Defoe  democracy  demography  development  discipline  display  dispute_resolution  dissenters  divine_right  domesticity  downloaded  Dryden  ecclesiology  economic_culture  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_policy  economic_sociology  education  education-civic  education-higher  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  Elizabeth  empires  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  environment  epistemology-moral  epistemology-social  equality  etexts  Europe-Early_Modern  Exclusion_Crisis  faction  family  family_law  femininity  feminism  Fielding  Filmer  finance_capital  financial_innovation  find  France  Freemasonry  free_trade  French_Revolution  gender  gender-and-religion  gender_history  Germany  German_Idealism  Glorious_Revolution  governance-church  governing_class  government-forms  Habermas  Harley  haute_bourgeoisie  Hebrew_commonwealth  Hegel  hierarchy  High_Church  historical_sociology  historiography  Hobbes  homosexuality  households  identity  identity_politics  impeachment  imperialism  individualism  Industrial_Revolution  industry  inequality  inheritance  Instapaper  institutional_economics  institutions  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  interest_groups  interest_rates  James_I  James_II  Jesuits  journalism  jstor  judiciary  jurisdiction  jurisprudence  kindle-available  labor  Labor_markets  labor_share  labor_standards  landed_interest  landowners  law-and-religion  legal_history  legal_reasoning  legal_system  liberty  limited_monarchy  links  literacy  literary_history  lit_crit  lit_survey  local_government  local_politics  Locke  Locke-1st_Treatise  London  Loyalists  marriage  masculinity  Medieval  mercantilism  merchants  metaphor-political  middle_class  migration  mixed_government  mobility  monarchy  monetary_policy  money  morality-Christian  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  mothers  narrative  nation-state  national_ID  natural_law  Netherlands  networks  nobility  norms  nouveaux_riches  novels  office  Old_Testament  oligarchy  Papacy  papal_infallibility  Parliament  parties  partisanship  patriarchy  patronage  patrons  paywall  Plato  pluralism  pluralism-legal  politeness  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_nation  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Poor_Laws  Pope  population  poverty  power  prices  print_culture  professions  progress  property  property_rights  provinces  public_disorder  public_health  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  Pufendorf  punishment  Puritans  Queen_Anne  Questia  racialism  racism  rank  reform-legal  reform-social  reformation_of_manners  religion-established  religion-fundamentalism  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  report  resistance_theory  Restoration  reviews  rights-legal  Romanticism  rural  satire  Scottish_Enlightenment  SCOTUS  sex  sexuality  sexual_practices  sin  slavery  sociability  social_capital  social_history  social_mobility  social_order  social_process  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  Somers  sovereignty  SSRN  stadial_theories  state-building  statistics  status  Swift  territory  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-sentimental  theology  Tories  trade  tradition  travel  trusts  Tyrrell  urbanism  urbanization  urban_elites  urban_politics  US_constitution  US_history  US_legal_system  US_society  Vatican_II  video  violence  wages  wealth  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  women  women-education  women-intellectuals  women-legal_status  women-property  women-rights  women-work  working_class  xenophobia 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: