dunnettreader + faction   36

Jack M. Balkin -The Last Days of Disco: Why the American Political System is Dysfunctional :: SSRN - Boston University Law Review, Vol. 94, 2014
...what looks like constitutional dysfunction is actually constitutional transition, (..)Americans last experienced this sense of dysfunction during the late 1970s and early 1980s (..) the transition to a new constitutional regime will be far more difficult than those effected in 1932 and 1980. (1) the growth of the modern state and changes in the role of the presidency mean that even the most politically adept and fortunate presidents face greater obstacles to implementing transformative change than they once did; they are less able than past reconstructive leaders to disrupt existing institutions and clear the ground for a new politics. This, by itself, does not prevent the emergence of a new constitutional regime. But (2) the current transition will be especially difficult because we are near the peak of a long cycle of increasing polarization between the nation’s two major political parties. That polarization greatly raises the stakes of a transition to a new constitutional regime. The defenders of the old order have every incentive to resist the emergence of a new regime until the bitter end. A long and frustrating transition will have important side effects. (1) a dysfunctional Congress tempts the Executive to act unilaterally, (..). Future presidents may use these new sources of power even when the period of dysfunction has passed. (2) sustained political dysfunction also tends to empower the judiciary vis-à-vis Congress. Moreover, judges appointed by the older dominant party, late in the regime, are less likely to engage in judicial restraint and more likely to push the jurisprudential envelope. This helps explain some of the Roberts Court's recent work. -- PDF File: 40 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_politics  US_constitution  SCOTUS  exec_branch  US_President  Congress  US_judiciary  separation-of-powers  faction  GOP  Democrats  legal_history  political_change  political_culture  legal_culture  originalism  change-social  power-asymmetric  ideology  conflict  competition-political  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  government-forms  government-roles  polarization  policymaking  political_gridlock  limited_government  judicial_review  conservatism  right-wing  political_participation  rule_of_law  instrumentalist  means-justify-ends  legitimacy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Karmack - Jonathan Rauch: Political realism - In praise of old fashioned politics | Brookings Institution - May 2015
Jonathan Rauch's paper “Political realism: How hacks, machines, big money and back-room deals can strengthen American democracy” marks the beginning of a serious effort on behalf of Brookings scholars to open up a conversation challenging the reform assumptions of the past few decades. In the coming months we will be convening social scientists and public intellectuals along with politicians and activists in order to explore a new way of looking at solutions to the polarization of contemporary American politics. Not everyone will agree—with Rauch—or with each other. But we feel the time has come to take on the conventional reform wisdom and begin an intellectual dialogue on why our democracy seems to be failing. Taking a page from international relations where realism assumes conflict among nations; political realism also assumes that conflict is a constant part of the system. According to Rauch realism, “…sees governing as difficult and political peace and stability as treasures never to be taken for granted.” He goes on to argue the virtues of transactional politics and to point out how, in the name of reform, weakening the bulwarks of transactional politics has weakened democracy as a whole. “Where the realist tends to believe that governing is inherently difficult, that politics is inherently transactional and that success is best judged in terms of reaching social accommodation rather than achieving some abstract purpose, the progressive tends to see government as perfectible and politics as a path toward a higher public good.” In practice this means that the political realist advocates things that have been anathema to reformers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  good_government  sunshine_laws  transparency  realism-political  IR-realism  reform-political  parties  partisanship  faction  extremism  polarization  conflict  common_good  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_sociology  political_participation  political_science  politics-and-money  campaign_finance  elections  public_sphere  public_policy  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Brookhiser, review essay - Finally, James Madison Mania | The Daily Beast April 2015
Four new titles join the list: The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 by Joseph J. Ellis; Becoming Madison: The Extraordinary Origins of the Least Likely Founding Father by Michael Signer; The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure America’s Liberties, by Carol Birken; and Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David O. Stewart. -- the Ellis book measures up to expectations from his earlier books -- the most interesting looks like the Stewart book that goes through the presidency period and his relationship with Monroe -- as Brookhiser points out, not enough is being done on Madison as key to his and Jefferson’s "invention" of American political parties and what that involved in flipping from their approach to the Constitution, as well as ideologically obliterating Washington's heritage.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  Jefferson  political_philosophy  republicanism  political_discourse  parties  faction  biography 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
José Luis Martí & Félix Ovejero - « Républicanisme et participation citoyenne. Réponse à "La démocratie directe de la Puerta del Sol" » | La Vie des idées - Sept 2011
José Luis Martí et Félix Ovejero répondent à l’analyse du mouvement des indignés espagnols proposée dans la Vie des idées par Eva Botella, et prennent la défense de Philip Pettit. Son républicanisme est certes attentif aux risques d’excès de démocratie, mais rien dans sa théorie politique, qui valorise la délibération publique, ne s’oppose aux réclamations du mouvement du 15M. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  political_philosophy  republicanism  political_participation  social_movements  socialism  social_democracy  democracy  democracy_deficit  Pettit  parties  partisanship  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob Weisberg, review essay - Bridge Too Far - Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan | Democracy Journal - Issue #34, Fall 2014
Rick Perlstein’s account of Ronald Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity, but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough. --
The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan By Rick Perlstein • Simon & Schuster • 2014 • 810 pages -- see Perlstein’s response -- both downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rick Perlstein - The Reason for Reagan, A response to Jacob Weisberg. | Democracy Journal: Issue #35, Winter 2015
In 1984, the year Reagan won 49 states and 59 percent of the popular vote, only 35 percent of Americans said they favored substantial cuts in social programs in order to reduce the deficit. Given these plain facts, historiography on the rise of conservatism and the triumph of Ronald Reagan must obviously go beyond the deadening cliché that since Ronald Reagan said government was the problem, and Americans elected Ronald Reagan twice, the electorate simply agreed with him that government was the problem. But in his recent review of my book The Invisible Bridge [“A Bridge Too Far,” Issue #34], Jacob Weisberg just repeats that cliché—and others. “Rick Perlstein’s account of Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity,” the article states, “but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough.” Weisberg is confident those reasons are obvious. Is he right? -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  lecture  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Alzada Tipton - Caught between "Virtue" and "Memorie": Providential and Political Historiography in Samuel Daniel's the Civil Wars | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 3/4 (1998), pp. 325-341
Daniel had Essex connections that got him in trouble for a play - his Civil Wars dealt with Lancaster and York from deposition of Richard Ii - another sensitive topic. Tension among ambitions as courtier, patronage limks with factions in upper elite, and artistic and historiographical standards that he intended to meet to obtain reputation as an author, though those standards were unclear and in the process of shifting in late Elizabethan and early Jacobean culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  history_of_England  14thC  15thC16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Wars_of_the_Roses  patronage  faction  censorship  historians-and-politics  exempla  Providence  courtiers  court_culture  playwrights  Elizabethan  Essex_rebellion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Clive Holmes, review - (1) Joel Samaha, Law and Order in Historical Perspective: The Case of Elizabethan Essex and (2) A. Hassell Smith, County and Court: Government and Politics in Norfolk, 1558-1603 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 3
Very useful discussion of the very different tales told re administrative efficiency of local government and judiciary in Elizabethan Norfolk and Essex. Particularly noteworthy was the factionalism that emerged after the fall of the Duke of Norfolk when Norfolk gentry fought for the various powers and control of patronage that had been monopolized by the Duke. The disappearance of the top status figure removed a key organizing part of the structure of ranks and status recognition, producing what sounds like a free-for-all vicious competition. Of course factions tried to develop court connections they could exploit. In addition to contributing local conflicts to central court confkicts, the central-local links also worked the other way. The Elizabethan government, frustrated by the variability and often poor quality of implementation by locals of central policies and concerns, including for security and defense, resorted to delegating particular matters to narrower groups than the overall county structures - e,.g. militia commissions and even letters patent. This selectivity would feed local factional competition. But the disputes fed back into conflicts at the central level in the latter part of Elizabeth's reign even Parliamentary constitutional debates challenging the prerogative to circumvent local government structures.
books  reviews  16thC  Elizabethan  British_history  British_politics  local_government  English_constitution  central_government  centralization  prerogative  judiciary  status  patronage  criminal_justice  bureaucracy  rationalization-institutions  state-building  faction  political_culture  elites  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Principle of Loyal Opposition (last revised 2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-22 -- The Principle of Loyal Opposition is key to the way in which modern democracies organize themselves. It is bound up with the existence of political parties, of which we need to take much more notice in political theory (as Nancy Rosenblum has argued) and with the significance of reasonable disagreement in politics. The principle is exhibited most clearly in systems that actually assign a role to an official Opposition party and an Opposition Leadership. But versions of it are also apparent in American-style constitutions, albeit they are harder to discern in a context in which different functions of government may assigned, branch by branch, to members of different political parties. Finally, the paper interrogates the idea of "loyalty" in "loyal opposition." Loyalty to what? The paper argues that the phrase should not connote any sort of litmus test of support for constitutional essentials, but should rather convey a sense that as far as possible opposition parties are always to be regarded as loyal, no matter what policies or constitutional changes they favor. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: constitution, constitutional essentials, democracy, loyal opposition, political parties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  partisanship  parties  faction  opposition  political_culture  political_order  competition-political  loyalty  political_nation  constitutionalism  democracy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 6 (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 6. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2104> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 6 contains (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution. The last continued part of the Defence of the Constitutions deals with Marchmont Nedham and writings on the commonwealth. Davila is the history of the 16thC French Wars_of_Religion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  political_history  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  US_constitution  state_government  federalism  commonwealth  historiography  France  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Terror  Directoire  Napoleon  Napoleonic_Wars  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  centralization  central_government  local_government  parties  partisanship  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Questier - Arminianism, Catholicism, and Puritanism in England during the 1630s | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 53-78
The relationship between Arminianism and Roman Catholicism in the early Stuart period has long been a source of historiographical controversy. Many contemporaries were in no doubt that such an affinity did exist and that it was politically significant. This article will consider how far there was ideological sympathy and even rhetorical collaboration between Caroline Catholics and those members of the Church of England whom both contemporaries and modern scholars have tended to describe as Arminians and Laudians. It will suggest that certain members of the English Catholic community actively tried to use the changes which they claimed to observe in the government of the Church of England in order to establish a rapport with the Caroline regime. In particular they enthused about what they perceived as a strongly anti-puritan trend in royal policy. Some of them argued that a similar style of governance should be exercised by a bishop over Catholics in England. This was something which they believed would correct the factional divisions within their community and align it more effectively with the Stuart dynasty. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  Puritans  Laudian  Charles_I  ecclesiology  clergy  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  faction  popery  Catholics-England  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul E. J. Hammer - Shakespeare's Richard II, the Play of 7 February 1601, and the Essex Rising | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Spring, 2008), pp. 1-35
He's published books on Essex and late Elizabethan politics - not a literary histirian. Extensive bibliography on late Elizabethan politics, the difficulties in Ireland, and factions of courtiers and counselors, not only re administration, public financial difficulties, and the succession, but foreign policy, especially re Spain. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  1590s  1600s  Elizabeth  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  military_history  courtiers  court_culture  counselors  public_finance  public_disorder  conspiracy  treason  torture  faction  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-Spanish  Shakespeare  political_culture  nobility  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Bob Harris and Jeremy Black - John Tucker, M.P., and Mid-18thC British Politics | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 29, No. 1 (Spring, 1997), pp. 15-38
Tucker only appears for historians as a blank without principles -- family papers acquired in 1970 cast a different light on how historians have viewed last part of Walpole regime through mid century -- extensive references to secondary literature -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  political_history  18thC  1740s  1750s  British_politics  Parliament  faction  opposition  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Sabl - The Last Artificial Virtue: Hume on Toleration and Its Lessons | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 4 (August 2009), pp. 511-538
David Hume's position on religion is, broadly speaking, "politic": instrumental and consequentialist. Religions should be tolerated or not according to their effects on political peace and order. Such theories of toleration are often rejected as immoral or unstable. The reading provided here responds by reading Hume's position as one of radically indirect consequentialism. While religious policy should serve consequentialist ends, making direct reference to those ends merely gives free reign to religious-political bigotry and faction. Toleration, like Hume's other "artificial virtues" (justice, fidelity to promises, allegiance to government), is a universally useful response to our universal partiality—as Established uniformity, however tempting, is not. This implies that toleration can progress through political learning, becoming broader and more constitutionally established over time. A sophisticated Humean approach thus shares the stability and normative attractiveness of respect- or rights-based arguments while responding more acutely and flexibly to problems the former often slights: antinomian religious extremism; underdefined political agency; and internationalized, politicized religious movements. -- extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  religion-established  tolerance  civil_liberties  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  social_order  freedom_of_conscience  faction  bigotry  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven G. Calabresi - Political Parties as Mediating Institutions | JSTOR: The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 1479-1533
Using Lloyd Cutler proposals to strengthen political parties in order to clarify accountability of politicians which the US system of checks and balances muddies, he discusses why he thinks it's a bad idea to strengthen roles of "mediating" institutions. The first parts of the article look at the history of the Founders deliberately making it difficult for parties to have a major role, and the philosophical and historical basis for their united opposition to party and faction. Big bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  18thC  US_constitution  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Adams_John  Jefferson  parties  faction  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Boyd - Thomas Hobbes and the Perils of Pluralism | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 63, No. 2 (May, 2001), pp. 392-413
Scholarly opinion has been split uneasily between those who view Thomas Hobbes as a defender of Royalist absolutism and those who see him as the intellectual forefather of liberal individualism. While both these positions are compatible with Hobbes's deep-seated fear of intermediary associations between individual and state, this article will contend that it is his fear of the violent and irrational properties of groups that motivates his well-known individualism and gives a potentially illiberal bent to his political thought. Attending to Hobbes's neglected thoughts on the dangers posed by parties, sects, and other groups between individual and state sheds light on both the historical context and intellectual legacy of his thought. Hobbes's metaphorical complaints about those "lesser Common-wealths" akin to "wormes in the entrayles of a naturall man" also should prompt us to rethink many versions of contemporary pluralism and the vogue of civil society: Much of what today is recommended as "civil society" was considered anything but "civil" in the early modern political imagination.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  Absolutism  individualism  liberalism  fear  parties  faction  sectarianism  pluralism  civil_society  civil_liberties  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Lindsay - James Madison on Religion and Politics: Rhetoric and Reality | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 85, No. 4 (Dec., 1991), pp. 1321-1337
The recent Oregon v. Smith decision's shifting of the burden in free exercise cases from legislatures to minority religious claims has brought fierce opposition, most conspicuously from leading nonpreferentialist Richard J. Neuhaus, who sees in it the foundation of majority tyranny. Against Smith, Neuhaus employs Madison's @'Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments,@' which is universally read to argue that the superiority of religion to politics proscribes majoritarian hegemony over religious practices. I contend that the Memorial's appeals are better understood as rhetoric than as reflecting Madison's true view. I find Madison hostile not only to religious establishments but also to religion itself. This hostility was the basis of his rejection of the non-preferentialists' utility-based argument for government support of religion. In this light, I uncover a curious historical irony: the nonpreferentialist Neuhaus seeks today to protect religion from hostility by adhering to a position that was originally animated, in key respects, by hostility both to religion and to its nonpreferential support. -- didn't download -- useful analysis of connection between means of avoiding faction (Federalist 10) and mixing religion with politics.
article  jstor  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  18thC  US_constitution  establishment_clause  Madison  faction  tolerance  majoritarian  minorities  Supreme_Court  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: David A. Brewer - Harold Love, English Clandestine Satire, 1660-1702 | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Spring, 2008), pp. 433-435
great explanation of how lampoons worked within court culture, often using sexual misconduct as code for critique of power relations, factional battles, and misconstrued by country gentry and later scholars. Love also goes into development of the Town and relations with court culture.
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  political_culture  British_politics  English_lit  17thC  Restoration  court_culture  Town  sexuality  aristocracy  corruption  faction  find  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick Deneen - The Representation We Deserve | The American Conservative Oct 2013
it is at least instructive to stand back from the current moment and consider the curious status of representation itself in today’s political circumstance. For we have neither of the two proposed forms of representation that were debated at the creation of America, but instead a hybrid that, arguably, combines the worst of both without the virtues of either.

Mostly forgotten today is that a major source of debate during the original ratification debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists was the very nature of representation, and in particular, the role that would be played by elected officials along with their relationship to the citizenry. The debate especially touched on respective views of the organization of the House of Representatives, but more broadly implicated the very nature of representation itself.
US_politics  US_history  US_constitution  Founders  faction  political_philosophy  political_culture  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael Ignatieff - Enemies vs. Adversaries - NYTimes.com Oct 2013
Re US government shutdown farce - For democracies to work, politicians need to respect the difference between an enemy and an adversary.
US_politics  political_philosophy  political_culture  parties  faction  legitimacy  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Coppage- Back to Bolingbroke: Opposition as an Opportunity | The American Conservative
Blasting Cruz et al - In his post, Yuval goes on to quote the Viscount Bolingbroke, a British statesman of old, on the duties of a proper patriotic opposition:
21stC  US_politics  parties  faction  Bolingbroke 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - The Constitution vs. Calhoun: Why Harry Jaffa Is Still Wrong About Willmoore Kendall | The American Conservative
Calhoun’s idea of the concurrent majority among different groups (and in effect, different peoples) is antithetical to Kendall’s understanding of a united people encompassing many factional interests. “The deliberate sense of the community” makes no sense if there are many communities; the whole can’t check the abuses of majority or minority factions if there is no whole. Not only is Calhoun not Kendall’s hero, but the entire intellectual edifice Kendall devoted his life to describing—in The Conservative Affirmation, in Basic Symbols, and in the essays and fragments of Contra Mundum—is built on a foundation that denies Calhoun’s premises.
19thC  20thC  US_history  US_politics  political_philosophy  political_culture  US_Civil_War  faction  national_interest  community  conservatism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Democracy and the Problem of the Partisan State by Yasmin Dawood :: SSRN - May 2013
To appear in: NOMOS LIV: Loyalty (Sanford Levinson, Joel Parker & Paul Woodruff, eds) 257-291 (2013). -- Faculty of Law, University of Toronto -- downloaded pdf to Note This article draws a distinction between first-order partisanship and second-order partisanship. First-order partisanship encompasses the selection of public policies and the selection of public officials. An example of first-order partisanship is the implementation by the President of the partisan agenda of his or her political party. Second-order partisanship encompasses the selection of the rules by which public policies and public officials are selected. An example of second-order partisanship is the influence of partisanship on electoral redistricting. This article argues that first-order partisanship has a qualified claim to democratic legitimacy while second-order partisanship has almost no claim to democratic legitimacy. The reason for this difference is that first-order partisanship is largely consistent with the principle of self-government, while second-order partisanship, by contrast, undermines and disrupts self-government. The article then develops a typology by which to assess and judge the actions of the partisan state. Number of Pages in PDF File: 35
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  legitimacy  parties  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Pat Rogers: Swift and Bolingbroke on Faction (1970)
JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 9, No. 2 (May, 1970), pp. 71-101 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  parties  faction  18thC  British_politics  Swift  Bolingbroke  Burke  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Arthur Scherr: Inventing the Patriot President: Bache's "Aurora" and John Adams (1995)
JSTOR: The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 119, No. 4 (Oct., 1995), pp. 369-399 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- lots of Bolingbroke and bibliography discussion (eg Presidentx above Parties)
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  US_constitution  parties  faction  US_history  US_politics  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  republicanism  Bolingbroke  Patriot_King  political_press  public_opinion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sean Elliott: Contending for liberty : principle and party in Montesquieu, Hume, and Burke (2010 thesis)
University of St Andrews -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This thesis explores the political reformation of “faction” in the political thought of Montesquieu, David Hume, and Edmund Burke, three thinkers whose works span what Pierre Manent calls “an exquisite moment of liberalism.” It examines the transformation of faction from one based largely on class to one based largely on political function and argues that as the political emphasis of “party” overtook that of class, a disconnect in constitutional theory appeared between the principles formerly associated with class, such as honor, and the principles now associated with parties. This disconnect is examined by focusing on the interrelated concepts of political principle, or that which motivates and regulates men, and faction, itself divided into two types, principled and singular. This thesis further considers the role of political principle to faction in each thinker’s thought in order to demonstrate how limited domestic political conflict could sustain itself via a party system. Each thinker recognized that limited political conflict did not weaken the state but rather strengthened it, if engendered by “principled faction” cognizant of a nominal sovereign. Accordingly, it is argued that a similar understanding of “principled faction,” though focused largely on aristocratic ideas of prejudice, self-interest, and inequality, better promoted political liberty within the state and contributed to a greater acceptance of party in political thought.
thesis  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  18thC  Britain  France  British_politics  faction  parties  Montesquieu  Hume  Burke  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold Mah: Phantasies of the Public Sphere: Rethinking the Habermas of Historians (2000)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), New Work on the Old Regime and the French Revolution: A Special Issue in Honor of François Furet (March 2000), pp. 153-182

Excellent discussion not only of historiography of social movements and French Revolution. Tension between public sphere conceived as space of free contestation and requirement to discard social particularity and interests and adopt universal reason and common good to be accepted as legitimate participants. Transformation into a singular public as subject and contests over who can represent this public. Rousseau’s General Will may produce Terror as only physical domination resolves contest. But competition that doesn't strive for legitimacy is the evil of faction. Process of calling into existence a (ohantasm) single public and then the capability to dismiss it (Thermidor, Napoleon's plebecites etc) not only needs to be explained -- key historical dynamic of political modernity.
Important for contests in Britain re Revolution Principles and who was heir of legacy that could speak for The People.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  Habermas  public_opinion  17thC  18thC  Rousseau  French_Revolution  common_good  faction  Bolingbroke  EF-add  public_sphere 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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