dunnettreader + experimental_philosophy   31

Kristin M. Girten - Unsexed Souls: Natural Philosophy as Transformation in Eliza Haywood's Female Spectator (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 55-74 -- Though love and marriage are Eliza Haywood's central concerns in The Female Spectator, the first periodical written by a woman with a primarily female audience in mind, in a series of issues devoted to the study of Baconian empiricism, Haywood turns her attention away from such concerns to the natural world. This essay aims to determine what is at stake in the Female Spectator's philosophical interactions with nature. It argues that, for Haywood, natural philosophy is a tool with which women may expand the horizon of, and thereby reshape, the sphere to which they are consigned.-- lots of primary sources from Margaret Cavendish and Robert Boyle through 1st few decades of 18thC plus lit survey on gender, patriarchy etc in last few decades in literary history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  gender_history  17thC  18thC  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  women-intellectuals  empiricism  Haywood  1700s  1710s  Boyle  virtue_epistemology  self-development  self-knowledge  domesticity  science-public  publishing-women  Spectator  Cavendish_Margaret  Astell  bibliography 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Joanna Picciotto - Reforming the Garden: The Experimentalist Eden and "Paradise Lost" (2005) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 23-78 -- very long article with vast numbers of references to literary, naturao philosophy, and religious works of 17thC and early 18thC plus lit survey of work on sociology of knowledge, English lit since the cultural turn, and religious culture. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  experimental_philosophy  Bacon  Boyle  Locke  Milton  Royal_Society  Evelyn  religious_culture  religious_lit  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  microscope  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  scientific_method  curiosity  Fall  original_sin  Paradise_Lost  improvement  instruments  Hooke  Donne  poetry  virtuosos  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  nature-mastery  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jared P. Friedman and Anthony I. Jack - Mapping cognitive structure onto philosophical debate re problems of consciousness, free will and ethics | Minds Online - Sept 2015 - Session 1 - Social Cognition
Mapping cognitive structure onto the landscape of philosophical debate: An empirical framework with relevance to problems of consciousness, free will and ethics -- Department of Philosophy and Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence, Case Western Reserve University -- There are some seemingly intractable questions that have remained at the heart of philosophical discourse since they were first asked. Is the mind distinct from the brain or are we just physical stuff? Are we autonomous agents or merely at the mercy of the causal and mechanistic laws of nature? When, if ever, is it acceptable to sacrifice one for the greater good of many? That these questions have remained at the heart of philosophy for so long, and that their ‘solutions’ (e.g., monism vs. dualism) seem to be incommensurable with each other, strikes us as enigmatic. Might the intractable nature of these and other appropriately identified problems reflect something peculiar about us rather than something peculiar about the way the world is? (...) This account maintains that the difficulties reconciling markedly different philosophical responses to these three questions arise from an unavoidable tension between two anatomically independent and functionally inhibitory neural networks, both of which are essential to human understanding. This account is motivated by the observation that both philosophers and non-philosophers experience difficulty in reconciling competing responses to these questions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  conference  cognition  antimonies  consciousness  mind-body  neuroscience  determinism  free_will  naturalism  physicalism  reductionism  causation  moral_philosophy  metaethics  intuitions  brain  experimental_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  James_William  monism  dualism  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Kocku von Stuckrad, "The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000" (De Gruyter, 2014)
Kocku von Stuckrad, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen, demonstrates how the construction of what constitutes 'religion' and 'science' was a relational process that emerged with the competition between various systems of knowledge. He traces the transformation and perpetuation of religious discourses as a result of their entanglement with secular academic discourses. In the first half of the book, he presents the discursive constructions of 'religion' and 'science' through the disciplines of astrology, astronomy, psychology, alchemy, chemistry, and scientific experimentation more generally. The second half of the book explores the power of academic legitimization of knowledge in emerging European modernities. Here, the discursive entanglements of professional and participant explanations of modern practices shaped and solidified those realities. Key figures in the history of the field of Religious Studies, such as Martin Buber, Gershom Scholem, Rudolf Otto, and Mircea Eliade, played instrumental roles in legitimizing the authority of mysticism, goddess worship, and shamanism. Ultimately, what we discover is that 'religion' and 'science' are not so much distinctive spheres but elastic systems that arise within the particular circumstances of secular modernity. In our conversation we discussed discursive approaches to the study of religion, the Theosophical Society, marginalized forms of knowledge, the occult sciences, Jewish mysticism, secularization, nature-focused spiritualities, experiential knowledge, pagan religious practices, and 'modern' science
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  sociology_of_knowledge  science-and-religion  19thC  20thC  mysticism  secularization  ritual  pagans  hermeticism  Kabbalah  alchemy  astrology  astronomy  experimental_philosophy  scientific_method 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENT AND ITS SOUL | Pandaemonium - May 2014
The science writer Philip Ball recently published a post on his blog Homunculus in which he wondered why modern scientific instruments seem to lack the beauty and soul of those of centuries past. Stephen Curry, professor of structural biology at Imperial College, wrote in response, on Occam’s Corner, the Guardian-hosted science blog, a wonderful little essay, in which he questioned some of Philip’s assumptions but made also a case for scientists to have more than an instrumental relationship to their instruments. Philip Ball then wrote an equally insightful reply in which he argued that scientific instruments are made not simply to do a job but also to express a certain image of science, to ‘employ a particular visual rhetoric’ in his words. The changing character of scientific instruments, he suggested, reflects the changing image of science that scientists wish to covey. -- Ball re visual rhetoric - what, and who, these instruments were for. Even for Galileo, the scientific experiment was still at least as much a demonstration as it was an exploration: it was a way of showing that your ideas were right. ...And in the earliest of the early modern era, during the late Renaissance, scientific instruments were objects of power. They were used by the virtuosi to delight and entertain their noble patrons, and thereby to imply a command of the occult forces of nature. For such a display, it was important that a device be impressive to look at: elegance was the key attribute of the courtly natural philosopher.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-public  virtuosos  patrons  scientific_method  experimental_philosophy  Galileo  Hooke  links  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Alessadro Arcangeli - Music, Science and Natural Magic in 17thC England by Penelope Gouk |JSTOR: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 4 (2003), pp. 535-537
Cultural practice of both music and experimental philosophy - private groups supported by patronage or coterie affiliation (court such as masque, aristocracy and universities) - training in both from early education - magus personalities include Hooke, Newton as well as the personalities we find so hard to relate to like Kitchener, who make sense in that environment. Lots of iconography and manuscripts as to be expected from a Warburg priduction. Dedicated to DP Walker.
books  reviews  find  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  music_history  patronage  court_culture  experimental_philosophy  coterie  Newton  Hooke  magic  alchemy  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Peter Harrison - Science and Dissent in England, 1688-1945, ed. Paul Wood | JSTOR: Minerva, Vol. 44, No. 2 (June 2006), pp. 223-227
Looks at extended Merton thesis - that elements of nonconformist theology and social practices were a congenial environment for innovation beyond the limited issue of the connections between Puritans and the Scientific Revolution. No clear answer though some of the studies in the book fit the thesis fairly well. Larry Stewart and another chapter deal with Dussenters in London in public science and coffeehouse philosophy. Their exclusion from the universities was a factor, both in encouraging groups engaged in experimental_philosophy in the city and in anxiety about the potentially volatile mix of religious nonconformity, political radicalism and intellectual innovation. -- didn't download
books  reviews  intellectual_history  history_of_science  science-and-religion  dissenters  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  innovation  experimental_philosophy  science-public  science-and-politics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Schaffer - Dévots et philosophes mécanistes: Ames et esprits dans la philosophie de la Nature, à l'époque de la Restauration anglaise | JSTOR: Ethnologie française, nouvelle serie, T. 23, No. 3 (Septembre 1993), pp. 316-335
Recent historiography of the Scientific Revolution has challenged the assumption that the achievements of seventeenth-century natural philosophy can easily be described as the mechanization of the world-picture. The clock-work world was triumphant and inevitably so. However, a close examination of one key group of natural philosophers working in England during the 1670s shows that their program necessarily incorporated souls and spirits, attractions and congruities, within both their ontology and their epistemology. Any natural philosophical strategy which excluded spirits and sympathies from its world was condemned as tending to subversion and irreligion. Through a description of the historical context of experimental work, the present article sets out to show how a philosophy of matter and spirit was deliberately constructed by the end of the seventeenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  17thC  British_history  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  mechanism  soul  mind-body  Boyle  More_Henry  scepticism  atheism_panic  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. R. Jacob - Boyle's Atomism and the Restoration Assault on Pagan Naturalism | JSTOR: Social Studies of Science, Vol. 8, No. 2 (May, 1978), pp. 211-233
This paper places Boyle's atomism in its social context, and describes the political motives which underlay it. Boyle's physico-theology was designed to answer the ideological challenges thrown up by the turbulent events of mid-seventeenth-century England. After the Restoration, Boyle and the Royal Society continued to use his natural philosophy to this end. One important example is Boyle's A Free Enquiry... (written in 1666, but not published until 1686). This addresses itself to the heretical implications of scholastic natural philosophy. Scholasticism, argues Boyle, assumes a universe in which a purposive rationality works quite apart from God and divine providence, and in which there is no distinction between 'nature' and 'providence'; this may lead to some form of 'paganizing naturalism', and so must be overthrown. Boyle's strategy is first to show that the scholastic conception is not scientifically valid, and then to offer his corpuscular philosophy as a superior alternative. However, Boyle's real enemy was not scholastic theory per se, but those who relied on it - papists and paganizing deists. In showing that both cherished outmoded assumptions about nature, Boyle attacked both kinds of idolatry simultaneously. The timing of the appearance of A Free Enquiry also added to its effectiveness as a shrewd piece of Anglican apologetics. It was published just when, because of James II's religious policy, the threat of subversion by papists and 'atheists' bulked larger than ever before in the minds of Anglican churchmen. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  church_history  natural_philosophy  17thC  Boyle  corpuscular  experimental_philosophy  Royal_Society  pagans  Deism  scholastics  anti-Catholic  natural_religion  Providence  God-attributes  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Donald W. Hanson - Reconsidering Hobbes's Conventionalism | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Autumn, 1991), pp. 627-651
Hobbes's linguistic conventionalism is one of the most obvious themes of his work. But it has not been considered as closely as it should be, given its prominence. I argue that Hobbes reworked quite traditional materials in such a way as to produce a novel doctrine, but that this novelty did not involve him in the implausible claim that issues of scientific truth and proof could be settled simply on the basis of linguistic agreement. Rather, he grounded his conventionalism in the prelinguistic, naturally given experience he called "mental discourse," and then linked it to the effort to outflank contemporary skepticism. For these reasons, Hobbes's specific form of conventionalism can then be seen to be central both to the limits of his claims and to what he thought could be established with a certainty robust enough to withstand skeptical challenge. -- bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  17thC  Hobbes  conventionalism-linguistic  scepticism  language  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Gorham - Mind-Body Dualism and the Harvey-Descartes Controversy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Apr., 1994), pp. 211-234
Looks quite helpful - different explanations of Descartes concern with Harvey showing heart as autonomic engine of circulation -- some attribute it to rationalist vs empiricist methodology, others to different ways of being empiricist, others to Descartes's metaphysical objection that an apparently self generating motion didn't fit with his mechanism hypothesis -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  physiology  anatomy  experimental_philosophy  rationalist  empiricism  mind-body  17thC  Descartes  Harvey  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Observation and Experiment in 17thC Anatomy | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2008
(1) Observation and Experiment in Mechanistic Anatomy (pp. 531-532) Domenico Bertoloni Meli and Rebecca Wilkin. *-- (2) Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks (pp. 533-567) Rebecca M. Wilkin. *-- (3) Harvey's and Highmore's Accounts of Chick Generation (pp. 568-614) Karin J. Ekholm. *-- (4) Experimenting with Chymical Bodies: Reinier de Graaf's Investigations of the Pancreas (pp. 615-664) Evan R. Ragland. *-- (5) The Collaboration between Anatomists and Mathematicians in the Mid-17thC with a Study of Images as Experiments and Galileo's Role in Steno's "Myology" (pp. 665-709) Domenico Bertoloni Meli
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  experimental_philosophy  anatomy  physiology  mechanism  corpuscular  17thC  Descartes  Malebranche  Harvey  chemistry  mathematics  Galileo  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Jenner - The Politics of London Air John Evelyn's Fumifugium and the Restoration | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 535-551
Historians have commonly described John Evelyn's pamphlet about London smoke pollution, Fumifugium, as a precocious example of environmental concern. This paper argues that such an interpretation is too simple. Evelyn's proposals are shown to be closely related to political allegory and the panegyrics written to welcome the newly restored Charles II. However, the paper also shows that Fumifugium was not simply a literary conceit; rather it exemplified the mid-seventeenth-century English interest in the properties of air that is visible in both the Hartlib circle and the early Royal Society. --didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  political_culture  history_of_science  British_history  Restoration  environment  London  pollution  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  Hartlib_Circle  Royal_Society  Evelyn  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Introduction by Richard Sorrenson to Issue: Did the Royal Society Matter in the 18thC? | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 130-132
Nice overview of utility how Royal Society saw itself and others saw it -- to society, to the state, sociability of clubs, interest in "wonder" of natural world, and reputation and acknowledgement local and international. Ftnts have good recent works.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  18thC  British_history  Royal_Society  clubs  sociability  Republic_of_Letters  experimental_philosophy  natural_history  virtuosos  Newtonian  technology  academies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Hahn, review - Margaret C. Jacob, Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 105, No. 5 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1793-1794
Good look at how Jacob theories re importance of Newtonianism, its spread, the Republic of Letters and freemasonry had profound effects on mentalities beyond the scientific and philosophical elites - in this narrative linking it to technology and industrial innovation. -- didn't download
books  reviews  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  experimental_philosophy  Newtonian  technology  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Freemasonry  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Al Coppola - Retraining the Virtuoso's Gaze: Behn's "Emperor of the Moon," the Royal Society, and the Spectacles of Science and Politics | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 481-506
Aphra Behn's The Emperor of the Moon (1687), so often marginalized in the wealth of recent criticism of her later career, is a savvy deconstruction of what the author calls-adapting Paula Backscheider's account of Restoration politics-a culture of spectacle in the post-Plot years, in which the feverish political speculations of Whigs and Tories, popular natural philosophy, and "non-rational" entertainments like opera and comedia dell'arte were inextricably enmeshed. A satiric restaging of John Dryden's Albion and Albanius, Behn's farce deliberately stimulates her audience's uncritical wonder in order to retrain it, a strategy it shares with the Musaeum Regalis Societatis. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  British_politics  17thC  theatre-Restoration  Behn  Dryden  Royal_Society  experimental_philosophy  virtuosos  James_II  public_opinion  Tories  Whigs  political_culture  political_spectacle  popular_politics  opera  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John Dewey: The Evolutionary Method As Applied to Morality: 1. Its Significance for Conduct I George Herbert Mead Project
John Dewey. "The Evolutionary Method As Applied to Morality: 1. Its Scientific Necessity", Philosophical Review 11, (1902): 107-124 . -- I shall endeavor to point out that there is more than analogy, there is an exact identity, between what the experimental method does for our physical knowledge, and what the historical method in a narrower sense may do for the spiritual region : the region of conscious values. My aim is to show that the historical method reveals to us a process of becoming, and thereby brings under intellectual and practical control facts which utterly resist general speculation or mere introspective observation.

History, as viewed from the evolutionary standpoint, is not a mere collection of incidents or external changes, which something fixed (whether spiritual or physical) has passed through, but is a process that reveals to us the conditions under which moral practices and ideas have originated. This enables us to place, to relate them. In seeing where they came from, in what situations they arose, we see their significance. Moreover, by tracing the historical sequence we are enabled to substitute a view of the whole in its concrete reality for a sketchy view of isolated fragments. History is for the individual and for the unending procession of the universe, what experiment is to the detached field of physics.
article  online_texts  Dewey  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  US_history  experimental_philosophy  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  moral_philosophy  history-as_experiment  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
John Dewey: The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy and other essays | George Herbert Mead Project
Originally published as: John Dewey. Table of Contents to The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy and Other Essays. New York: Henry Holt and Company (1910).

Preface

1 The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy

2 Nature and Its Good: A conversation

3 Intelligence and Morals

4 The Experimental Theory of Knowledge

5 The Intellectualist Criterion for Truth

6 A Short Catechism Concerning Truth

7 Beliefs and Existences

8 Experience and Objective Idealism

9 The Postulate of Immediate Empiricism

10 "Consciousness" and Experience

11 The Significance of the Problem of Knowledge
books  online_texts  Dewey  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  US_history  evolution-as-model  Darwinism  epistemology  moral_philosophy  empiricism  mind  experimental_philosophy  idealism  consciousness  nature  belief  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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