dunnettreader + exiles   8

John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, eds. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen (2011) — Social Science Research Council - Publications
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere (Columbia University Press, 2011) represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does—or should—religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of “the political” in contemporary theory. Charles Taylor argues for a radical redefinition of secularism, and Cornel West defends civil disobedience and emancipatory theology. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen detail the immense contribution of these philosophers to contemporary social and political theory, and an afterword by Craig Calhoun places these attempts to reconceive the significance of both religion and the secular in the context of contemporary national and international politics. The essays comprising this volume include Habermas’s “The Political: The Rational Meaning of a Questionable Inheritance of Political Theology,” Taylor’s “Why We Need a Radical Redefinition of Secularism,” Butler’s “Is Judaism Zionism?” and West’s “Prophetic Religion and the Future of Capitalist Civilization.” Each chapter was originally presented as a talk at a recent symposium co-hosted by the SSRC, the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and the Humanities Institute at SUNY Stony Brook. -- Excerpt from the afterword by Craig Calhoun downloaded pdf to Note -- the Taylor essay responded to at The Immanent Frame starting with Bigrami's paper
books  sociology_of_religion  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  politics-and-religion  political_participation  secularism  public_sphere  IR  IR-domestic_po  litics  Judaism  diasporas  exiles  Habermas  Taylor_Charles  Butler_Judith  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Corrado Bologna - Le retour des dieux anciens : Giulio Camillo et Fontainebleau | Italique, V, 2002, p109-138.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.152 **--** En ce début de XVIème, après des siècles d’absence, les dieux anciens “sont de retour” à Fontainebleau. Ils tapissent les murs, remplissent les bibliothèques, les salons royaux, les salles sévères des écoles universitaires. Leur présence inaugure une nouvelle mythographie et presque une nouvelle théologie païenne. Ce sont des dieux et des héros élégants, sophistiqués, très différents de ceux que, au milieu des années vingt, un grand élève de Raphaël, Giulio Romano, s’inspirant aux modèles antiques, inscrit de leur naturel de chair toute rosée et déjà flasque, où tant de maniéristes et de baroques trouveront leur inspiration, sur les murs de Palazzo Te à Mantoue. .La censure ecclésiastique et aussi politique déchaînent immédiatement une forte polémique (dont, à la fin du siècle et au terme du Concile de Trente, l’ouvrage de Gabriele Paleotti sanctionnera victorieusement la fin) à l’encontre de ce très heureux moment de paganisme potentiellement absolu, subversif, qui me semble proposer non pas tant un “retour à l’Esprit Classique”, qu’un “retour de l’Esprit Classique”. En songeant davantage et d’abord à la “cour païenne” du roi très chrétien à Fontainebleau plutôt qu’à la Rome “ville sacrée” du grand baroque de Bernin, je parlerais donc d’une « Présence réelle » de la mythologie paganisante que certains grands Italiens entent en France. -- gobs of footnotes and references - downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  art_history  literary_history  cultural_history  religious_history  16thC  France  Renaissance  pagans  gods-antiquity  cosmology  hermeticism  Neoplatonism  François_I  Henri_II  elite_culture  court_culture  Italian_influence  Counter-Reformation  baroque  myth  bibliography  artists  exiles  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
GABY MAHLBERG - "LES JUGES JUGEZ, SE JUSTIFIANTS" (1663) AND EDMUND LUDLOW‘S PROTESTANT NETWORK IN 17thC SWITZERLAND (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 369-396. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract -
GABY MAHLBERG - University of Northumbria -- This article aims to locate English republican thought and writing in a wider European context and to understand the personal connections that aided the distribution and reception of English republican ideas abroad. It does so through the case-study of a little-known pamphlet published by the English regicide Edmund Ludlow during his exile in Switzerland after the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660. Les juges jugez, se justifiants (1663) was a French translation of the dying speeches and other miscellaneous texts of some of the English regicides, produced in Geneva and subsequently printed in Yverdon with the help of Ludlow's local Protestant network. Rather than propagating a secular republican ideology, Ludlow offered his work to a European Protestant audience in the language of Geneva, promoting a primarily religious cause in an attempt to make martyrs out of political activists. It is therefore to Ludlow's Protestant networks that we need to turn to find out more about the transmission of English republican ideas in francophone Europe and beyond. - * The author would like to thank Cesare Cuttica, J. C. Davis, Andrew McKenzie-McHarg, and the anonymous readers at the Historical Journal for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Protestant_International  republicanism  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  regicide  martyrs  Geneva  France  Dutch  Huguenots  networks  networks-religious  networks-political  diffusion  Bolingbroke-family  exiles  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Marks, review - David Worthington. British and Irish Experiences and Impressions of Central Europe, c. 1560–1688 | H-Net Reviews February 2013
The book moves thematically through the primary components of the various British and Irish diasporas. The first successfully illustrates that travelers from Britain and Ireland did not confine themselves to western Europe and that the Grand Tour was far more than a visit to Italy. Worthington demonstrates that this area was a part of the British experience both in terms of awareness in printed accounts and as a part of the “Grand Tour.” .... the diplomacy undertaken by both the Tudor and Stuart courts, and provides an example of the breadth of diplomacy conducted by the Stuart monarchy. As Worthington writes, these activities serve “as a symbol of the complexity of English and later British foreign policy” and should be a stark warning to those who still perceive Stuart policy exclusively in terms of an axis from Paris to Madrid. ?...a useful account of the soldiers who fought on behalf of the Habsburgs and Poland before, during, and after the Thirty Years’ War. This chapter is perhaps the best example of Worthington’s ability to use contemporary British perspectives to explain central and east European events. ...the Protestant theologians in the area and makes a cursory overview of trade before moving to what is arguably the most effective chapter, dealing with the British and Irish Catholic colleges of the region. This effectively illustrates the crossover and divisions of the various Catholic orders. -- without further research on the English this creates as many questions as it answers. Why did the largest of the kingdoms of Britain and Ireland provide the least number of immigrants to the region? Is it simply that the economics of England meant that fewer felt the need to leave their homeland, or were they moving to other areas, such as the Low Countries, France, Iberia, or Scandinavia? -- British migrants continued to have a significant influence on their homelands through trade and politics, and in some cases by returning to their homelands to participate in open rebellion.
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  British_history  Ireland  Scotland  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  exiles  migration  Grand_Tour  Eastern_Europe  Central_Europe  Reformation  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomatic_history  education-higher  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  diasporas  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  1715_uprising  Absolutism  American_Revolution  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Anglo-French  anti-Catholic  article  artists  art_history  Augustine  balance_of_power  baroque  bibliography  Bolingbroke  Bolingbroke-family  books  bookshelf  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_Navy  British_politics  Butler_Judith  Calvinist  caricature  Catholics  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  Catholic_emancipation  Central_Europe  Charles_I  citizenship  city_states  colonialism  cosmology  Counter-Reformation  courtiers  court_culture  cultural_history  diasporas  diffusion  diplomatic_history  diplomats  downloaded  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Early_Christian  Eastern_Europe  economic_culture  education-higher  EF-add  elite_culture  Elizabeth  English_Civil_War  espionage  Europe-Early_Modern  exiles  fashion  feudalism  find  France  francophile  François_I  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Geneva  geography  Germany  Glorious_Revolution  gods-antiquity  Grand_Tour  Habermas  Hanoverian_Succession  Henri_II  hermeticism  historiography  Holy_Roman_Empire  Huguenots  intellectual_history  IR  IR-domestic_po  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR_theory  Italian_influence  Italy  Jacobites  James_I  James_II  James_III  jstor  Judaism  July_Monarchy  kindle-available  landowners  late_antiquity  legal_history  legal_theory  legitimacy  literary_history  litics  Louis_XIV  maps  martyrs  medieval_history  migration  military_history  moral_philosophy  myth  Napoleonic_Wars  national_ID  Neoplatonism  networks  networks-political  networks-religious  Nine_Years_War  nobility  Orléans_Duc_de  pagans  pamphlets  Papacy  patronage  paywall  political_culture  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-religion  popular_culture  popular_politics  prints  property  Protestant_International  public_opinion  public_sphere  reform-political  Reformation  Regency-France  regicide  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  Restoration  Restoration-France  reviews  revues.org  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  ruling_class  satire  Scotland  secularism  Seven_Years_War  social_history  social_theory  sociology_of_religion  sovereignty  Spain  Taylor_Charles  territory  theology  thesis  Thirty_Years_War  travel  Wars_of_Religion  War_of_Austrian_Succession  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  William_III  xenophobia  émigrés 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: