dunnettreader + eudaimonia   6

Matthew Sharpe - Stoic Virtue Ethics (2014) | Academia.edu - in Handbook of Virtue Ethics
The Handbook of Virtue Ethics, edited by Stan van Hooft et al, Acumen 2014 -- Research Interests: Virtue Ethics, Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, and Apatheia -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  virtue_ethics  virtue_epistemology  eudaimonia  downloaded  1960s 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Hadot, Pierre | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. Biography **--** 2. Philology and Method **--** 3. Early Work: Plotinus and the Simplicity of Vision **--** 4. What is Ancient Philosophy? -- (a) Philosophical Discourse versus Philosophy -- (b) Philosophy as a Way of Life -- (b) The Figure of Socrates -- (c) The Figure of the Sage **--** 5. Spiritual Practices -- (a) Askesis of Desire -- (b) Premeditation of Death and Evils -- (c) Concentration on the Present Moment -- (d) The View from Above -- (e) Writing as Hypomnemata, and The Inner Citadel **--** 6. The Transformation of Philosophy after the Decline of Antiquity -- (a) The Adoption of Spiritual Practices in Monasticism -- (b) Philosophical Discourse as Handmaiden to Theology and the Natural Sciences -- (c) The Permanence of the Ancient Conception of Philosophy **--** 7. References and Further Reading -- (a) Works in French. -- (b) Works in English. -- (c) Selected Articles on Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Socrates  eudaimonia  Stoicism  Epicurean  spiritual_practices  self-knowledge  self-sufficiency  self-development  self  self-control  passions  emotions  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  desire  judgment-emotions  meditation  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  transcendence  late_antiquity  monasticism  theology  philosophy_of_religion  natural_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Hadot_Pierre  French_intellectuals  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  Hellenism  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Iakovos Vasiliou interview with Richard Marshall - Plato aims at virtue » 3:AM Magazine
Blurb of his book, Aiming at Virtue in Plato -- This study of Plato's ethics focuses on the concept of virtue. Based on detailed readings of the most prominent Platonic dialogues on virtue, it argues that there is a central yet previously unnoticed conceptual distinction in Plato between the idea of virtue as the supreme aim of one's actions and the determination of which action-tokens or -types are virtuous. Appreciating the 'aiming/determining distinction' provides detailed and mutually consistent readings of the most well-known Platonic dialogues on virtue as well as original interpretations of central Platonic questions. Unlike most examinations of Plato's ethics, this study does not take as its centrepiece the 'eudaimonist framework', which focuses on the relationship between virtue and happiness. Instead, it argues that the dialogues themselves begin with the idea of the supremacy of virtue, examine how that claim can be defended, and address how to determine what constitutes the virtuous action. -- professor at CUNY
books  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  eudaimonia  virtue  virtue_ethics  deontology  Williams_Bernard 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
"CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Aristotle's discussion of corrective justice has been generally thought to mark the beginning of the philosophical examination of tort law. Many scholars also consider corrective justice, of one form or another, the main normative alternative to the economic analysis of law. Most discussions of Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice in the law review literature, however, have failed to account for the established reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics as proposing a teleological form of ethics. Accordingly, Corrective Justice and the Revival of Judicial Virtue argues for a teleological interpretation of Aristotle's conception of corrective justice. The teleological conception of corrective justice does not attempt to analyze corrective justice merely as a formal (Weinrib), substantive (Wright), or political (Heyman) conception of equality or freedom that can be applied by technical reason to various circumstances. Rather, it maintains that corrective justice is a moral virtue of the judge that cannot be fully understood without specifying its relationship to practical wisdom and the telos of the good life. Under this reading, Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice specifies a method of judicial decision making whereby only the practically wise (i.e., morally virtuous) judge can know the content of corrective justice in all cases. Judging requires moral virtue not technical, philosophical or legal, expertise. Consequently, this article advocates a revival of Aristotle’s notion that judicial virtue requires moral virtue. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 12.2 (2000): 249-298. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  moral_philosophy  Aristotle  virtue_ethics  phronesis  eudaimonia  justice  torts  law-and-economics  civic_virtue  judiciary  juddgment-moral  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-political  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
E. K. Hunt - The Normative Foundations of Social Theory: An Essay on the Criteria Defining Social Economics | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 63, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2005), pp. 423-445
Two views of human nature underlie economic theory and any theory incorporating either view is not social economics. The first view sees human nature as metaphysically or genetically given. This view has difficulty giving differences in the structure and functioning of different societies any importance. The other view asserts that humans are entirely "created" by society. In this view, humans are merely malleable "stuff" which a society molds into "building blocs" appropriate to that society. Hunt argues that social economics lies mid-way between these extremes. Humans are "molded" by the social system of which they are a part, but that socialization is never total because humans are not "malleable stuff." There is a human nature that sometimes resists and occasionally negates socialization. Human nature is a complex set of innate needs and potentialities. Socialization creates "wants" the satisfaction of which may contribute to the satisfaction of the underlying needs, and leads to activities that develop to a certain degree the underlying potentialities. It is the task of social economics to identify those needs and potentialities and to formulate a "vision" of the fully developed human being. Hunt concludes that neoclassical economic theory is not social economics while the theories of Veblen and Marx are social economics.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  economic_theory  social_theory  neoclassical_economics  human_nature  socialization  rational_choice  Marx  Veblen  institutional_economics  capacity_fulfillment  eudaimonia  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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