dunnettreader + etymology   4

Online Etymology Dictionary
This is a map of the wheel-ruts of modern English. Etymologies are not definitions; they're explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago. The dates beside a word indicate the earliest year for which there is a surviving written record of that word (in English, unless otherwise indicated). This should be taken as approximate, especially before about 1700, since a word may have been used in conversation for hundreds of years before it turns up in a manuscript that has had the good fortune to survive the centuries. The basic sources of this work are Weekley's "An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English," Klein's "A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language," "Oxford English Dictionary" (second edition), "Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology," Holthausen's "Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Englischen Sprache," and Kipfer and Chapman's "Dictionary of American Slang." A full list of print sources used in this compilation can be found here. Since this dictionary went up, it has benefited from the suggestions of dozens of people I have never met, from around the world. Tremendous thanks and appreciation to all of you.
website  reference  language-history  English-language  etymology  dictionary 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Eugen Weber, The ups and downs of honor | The American Scholar v. 68 no1 (Winter 1999)
Author: Weber, Eugen. Source: The American Scholar v. 68 no1 (Winter 1999) p. 79-91 -- from Homer to the Wire with lots of Latin, German, French and English etymology and a digression on the democratization of 19thC French duelling
article  cultural_history  social_history  political_history  ethics  honor  etymology  medieval_history  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Montesquieu  Montaigne  Rousseau  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Koebner: JSTOR: Despot and Despotism: Vicissitudes of a Political Term (1951)
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 14, No. 3/4 (1951), pp. 275-302 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Voltaire was very displeased with how Montesquieu popularized the neologism which first made its appearance in 17thC France and was adopted by the secret Bougainvilliers, Fenelon, Saint Simon opponents of Louis XIV. The paper then traces despot related usage starting with Plato and Aristotle through Church Fathers and Renaissance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  etymology  philology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Early_Christian  Medieval  Renaissance  Papacy  monarchy  Absolutism  Ottomans  China  France  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Louis_XIV  enlightened_absolutism  Hobbes  Bayle  Fenelon  Bougainvilliers  Saint_Simon  Voltaire  Montesquieu  liberty  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kristoffer Neville: Gothicism and Early Modern Historical Ethnography (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 213-234 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- lots of useful references to the historical claims to Biblical origins of different cultural or ethnic groups from 15thC through 17thC - often on basis of resemblance between contemporary place names and ancient references to barbarian groups
article  jstor  historiography  Bible-as-history  ethnography  language  etymology  15thC  16thC  17thC  Sweden  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  Habsburgs  genealogy  Netherlands  antiquity  Tacitus  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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