dunnettreader + environment   52

Centre for the Study of Existential Risk - Cambridge
The Centre for Study of Existential Risk is an interdisciplinary research centre focused on the study of human extinction-level risks that may emerge from technological advances. We aim to combine key insights from the best minds across disciplines to tackle the greatest challenge of the coming century: safely harnessing our rapidly-developing technological power. Our current major research projects include Managing Extreme Technological Risk (supported by the Templeton World Charity Foundation) and Extreme Risks and the Global Environment (supported by the Grantham Foundation), as well as our Blavatnik Public Lecture series and the Hauser-Raspe workshop series
website  risk  risk-systemic  risk_assessment  risk_management  risk-mitigation  environment  climate  technology  innovation-risk_management  Innovation  robotics  AI  video 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Ball, The Water Kingdom: A Secret History of China – review - The Guardian - August 2016
Tourists watch floodwaters gushing out of the Xiaolangdi dam during a sand-washing operation of the Yellow river in Jiyuan, China, 2010.Photograph: Miao… Useless review the only thing mentioned is "thorough" - since the reviewer was only interested in China's history of millenia dominated by water politics, one assumes that if Ball had made a hash of it, the faults would have been mentioned - and since Ball is an excellent writer of non-fiction, the assumption is the book must be pretty good
Instapaper  books  kindle-available  Chinese_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Confucianism  Daoism  Asian_philosophy  China-governance  political_culture  political_economy  ancient_history  Chinese_politics  China  water  infrastructure  agriculture  economic_sociology  economic_history  social_order  hierarchy  institutions  institutional_capacity  transport  rivers  environment  pollution  industrialization  from instapaper
august 2016 by dunnettreader
John Quiggin - Peak paper | Crooked Timber Feb 2016
I’ve recently published a piece in Aeon, looking at the peak in global paper use, which occurred a couple of years ago, and arguing that this is an indication…
Instapaper  economic_growth  economy-structure  industry  industrialization  commodities  Information_Economy  productivity  production  natural_resources  energy  energy-markets  environment  climate  consumption  international_political_economy  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
David Hugot - Entretien avec Philippe Descola (2011) - Cairn.info
Philippe Descola est ethnologue et anthropologue. Il occupe une chaire d’Anthropologie de la nature au Collège de France depuis 2000. Dans Par-delà nature et culture (Gallimard, 2005), il cherche à extraire l’anthropologie du paradigme que constituait pour elle le dualisme de la nature et de la culture. Il y montre que l’opposition entre nature et culture, loin d’être universelle, ne constitue qu’une façon parmi d’autres d’objectiver la réalité. La finalité de l’anthropologie s’en trouve profondément modifiée. Celle-ci ne n’est plus l’étude de la diversité des cultures sur fond d’une nature partout homogène, mais la mise au jour de schèmes, c’est-à-dire de structures d’objectivation de la réalité, dont l’opposition nature/culture n’est qu’une des réalisations possibles. Ce concept de « schème », qui témoigne de l’attachement de Philippe Descola au structuralisme, constitue un nouvel outil d’analyse, qui ne se confond pas avec les notions de « société », de « tribu », de « nation », de « classe » ou de « civilisation ». Les aires d’extension des différents schèmes ne coïncident en effet ni avec les frontières linguistiques, ni avec les réseaux d’échange, ni même avec les modes de vie des peuples étudiés par les sciences humaines. Ce faisant, Philippe Descola a semble-t-il forgé un instrument inédit, susceptible, au-delà de son usage proprement ethnologique, de repenser sur une base renouvelée l’histoire mondiale et le devenir de l’humanité. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
human_nature  environment  downloaded  nature-nurture  spatial  anthropology  nature-mastery  interview  cultural_history  social_theory  comparative_anthropology  Collège_deFrance 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Olivier Geden - Pragmatism in Climate Policy | Project Syndicate - Nov 2015
Re environmental activists finally openly recognizing top-down binding negotiations have been and will continue to be guaranteed to fail
Pocket  international_political_economy  international_organizations  multilateralism  UN  diplomacy-environment  climate  energy  environment  grassroots  from pocket
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Miriam Sapiro - Transatlantic trade and investment negotiations: Reaching a consensus on ISDS | Brookings Institution - October 2015
Two steps can accelerate this process. First, US and EU negotiating teams should reach agreement on a number of key principles ** There should be a neutral forum for adjudication, independent of the potential for bias inherent in a host state’s legal system.** An arbitration tribunal should operate under established principles of international law with consistency and predictability. ** The arbitrators should be beyond reproach in terms of independence, impartiality, and integrity. ** The tribunal should have the authority to dismiss frivolous and other non-meritorious claims early in the process. ** The proceedings should be transparent and open to the public. ** An option for annulment, and possibly appeal, should be considered. Second, (..) the US and the EU should appoint a senior group of experts to review in detail several of the more provocative proposals that have been put forward by the EU—such as creating an appellate mechanism for TTIP or, more broadly, an international ISDS court. This should be a broad group of experts representing a range of academic, legal, business, public interest, and other expertise, and reflecting deep knowledge of international investment law, arbitration rules, and judicial and regulatory decision-making. To build greater public support, the group should include voices that support modifications as well as oppose them, in an effort to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the various options, and to identify consensus where possible. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  trade-agreements  ISDS  EU  EU_governance  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  transparency  public_goods  investment-bilateral_treaties  investment  FDI  regulation  regulation-enforcement  regulation-costs  regulation-harmonization  environment  public_health  legal_remedies  legal_system  arbitration  international_law  international_political_economy  appellate_review  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
David Roberts - The transformative potential of self-driving electric cars | Vox - Sept 2015
Reimagining urbanization and lived environment that exploits the huge amount of land currently devoted to cars to handle far more population without changing lived experience of density
Pocket  futurology  environment  self-driving_cars  automation  IT  urban_development  urbanism  land_use_planning  transport  cities  energy  from pocket
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Kenny - Aiming High - setting the new Sustainable Development Goals -- Finance & Development, June 2015, Vol. 52, No. 2
2015 marks the deadline for the MDGs... And while it might come as a surprise to those in Japan, Europe, or North America, the past 15 years may have been the period of greatest progress in humanity’s quality of life. Not least, the available data suggest that we have seen the fastest declines in global child mortality and absolute poverty in recorded history. As a result, we have far surpassed the first MDG—to halve the number of people worldwide living on less than $1.25 a day. 2015 is also the starting date for the SDGs to be agreed at the UN this fall. These goals outline a vision of progress to 2030 covering poverty, health, education, security, the environment, governance, gender equality, and much more. ..at Addis Ababa in July this year will try to finance that new agenda. ... at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December, countries will pledge to cut greenhouse gas emissions, with the hope of setting us on a path away from catastrophic global warming. A strong agreement in Addis Ababa and progress toward the SDGs depend on advanced economies’ understanding that the issue is not altruism but naked self-interest. In 2002, when rich countries ... discussed global cooperation to meet the MDGs, these countries may have asked, “What can we do for them?” This time around the process can only be seen as “What can we do for each other?” Even though developing countries need global ties to make progress, at issue now is not persuading cash-strapped OECD finance ministers to be a little less skinflint but tackling a set of global problems that can be resolved only with the support of the developing world. -- in F&D issue downloaded as pdf to Note
article  sustainability  development  globalization  global_governance  global_system  climate  environment  trade  trade-policy  trade-agreements  global_value_chains  SDGs  poverty  aid  health  OECD_economies  public_finance  public_goods  cross-border  tax_collection  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Francis - Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013) - ENCYCLICAL LETTER ON FAITH | Vatican
Thanks to faith we have come to understand the unique dignity of each person, something which was not clearly seen in antiquity. In the second century the pagan Celsus reproached Christians for an idea that he considered foolishness and delusion: namely, that God created the world for man, setting human beings at the pinnacle of the entire cosmos. "Why claim that [grass] grows for the benefit of man, rather than for that of the most savage of the brute beasts?"[46] "If we look down to Earth from the heights of heaven, would there really be any difference between our activities and those of the ants and bees?"[47] At the heart of biblical faith is God’s love, his concrete concern for every person, and his plan of salvation which embraces all of humanity and all creation, culminating in the incarnation, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Without insight into these realities, there is no criterion for discerning what makes human life precious and unique. Man loses his place in the universe, he is cast adrift in nature, either renouncing his proper moral responsibility or else presuming to be a sort of absolute judge, endowed with an unlimited power to manipulate the world around him.
religious_history  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  faith  revelation  reason  religious_belief  Biblical_exegesis  church_history  Early_Christian  Old_Testament  New_Testament  Augustine  human_rights  human_nature  creation  soteriology  dignity  imago_dei  nature  nature-mastery  modernity  environment  social_thought  poverty  religious_experience  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jag Bhalla - Is The 'Tragedy of The Commons' a Myth? | Big Think - May 2015
by Jag Bhalla We are ill-fated idiots. That’s what some “rationalists” believe. An ancient Greek origin myth can avert this modern tragedy of reason (a… -- lots of links
rationality  rationality-economics  public_choice  collective_action  tragedgy_of_the_commons  common_good  resource_allocation  environment  climate-adaptation  links  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Beiting Cheng, Ioannis Ioannou, George Serafeim - Corporate Social Responsibility and Access to Finance - May 19, 2011 | Strategic Management Journal, 35 (1): 1-23. :: SSRN
Beiting Cheng, Harvard University - Harvard Business School -- Ioannis Ioannou, London Business School -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School **--** In this paper, we investigate whether superior performance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies leads to better access to finance. We hypothesize that better access to finance can be attributed to a) reduced agency costs due to enhanced stakeholder engagement and b) reduced informational asymmetry due to increased transparency. Using a large cross-section of firms, we find that firms with better CSR performance face significantly lower capital constraints. Moreover, we provide evidence that both of the hypothesized mechanisms, better stakeholder engagement and transparency around CSR performance, are important in reducing capital constraints. The results are further confirmed using several alternative measures of capital constraints, a paired analysis based on a ratings shock to CSR performance, an instrumental variables and also a simultaneous equations approach. Finally, we show that the relation is driven by both the social and the environmental dimension of CSR. -- Pages in PDF File: 43 -- Keywords: corporate social responsibility, sustainability, capital constraints, ESG (environmental, social, governance) performance -- didn't download
article  SSRN  business_practices  business-norms  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  shareholder_value  CSR  environment  sustainability  accounting  accountability  firms-theory  firms-structure  information-asymmetric  disclosure  finance-cost 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Panel discussion - Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing (Dec 2014) :: German Historical Institute London (GHIL)
Chair: Andreas Gestrich (German Historical Institute London) -- Discussants: David d’Avray, Peter Ghosh and Joachim Radkau -- Max Weber is one of the most prestigious social theorists in recent history. Many of his academic works are modern classics. Even 100 years after his death, his books are still read, edited, translated and interpreted. In recent years a number of biographies have shed new light on Weber’s life and work. In commemoration of Max Weber’s 150th anniversary, the German Historical Institute hosts a discussion with three Weber experts, British historians David d’Avray and Peter Ghosh and German historian Joachim Radkau, on Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing. **--** Peter Ghosh is Jean Duffield Fellow in Modern History at St Anne’ College, University of Oxford. His research interests focus primarily on the history of ideas, both social and political theory and also the history of historiography. His latest publication Max Weber and The Protestant Ethic: Twin Histories (Oxford University Press, 2014) offers an intellectual biography of Weber framed along historical lines. **--** David d’Avray, Professor of Medieval History at University College London, has worked on medieval marriage, on preaching, on attitudes to kingship and death, on rationalities, and on ‘longue durée’ structures of papal history. In Rationalities in History: a Weberian Analysis (Cambridge University Press 2010), he writes a new comparative history in the spirit of Max Weber. Reassessing seminal Weberian ideas, he applies value rationality to the comparative history of religion and the philosophy of law. **--** Joachim Radkau is Professor for Modern History at the University of Bielefeld. His latest research interests concentrate on environmental history, the history of nature conservation, and Max Weber’s self and social perception. In his extensive biography Max Weber: Die Leidenschaft des Denkens (Carl Hanser Verlag, 2005) (Max Weber: Passion for thinking), Radkau embeds Weber’s life and work in their historical context. -- MP3 download, 113 min, 64.2 MB -- downloaded to Note
audio  intellectual_history  Weber  social_theory  comparative_history  historiography-19thC  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  philosophy_of_law  sociology_of_religion  medieval_history  longue_durée  Papacy  biography  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  religious_history  rationality  environment  ecology-history  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones, Marco H.D. van Leeuwen, and Stephen Broadberry - The Future of Economic, Business, and Social History | Scandinavian Economic History Review 60, no. 3 (November, 2012): 225–253
3 leading scholars in the fields of business, economic, and social history review the current state of these disciplines and reflect on their future trajectory. Jones reviews the development of business history since its birth at HBS during the 1920s. He notes the discipline's unique record as a pioneer of the scholarly study of entrepreneurship, multinationals, and the relationship between strategy and structure in corporations, as well as its more recent accomplishments, including exploring new domains such as family business, networks and business groups, and retaining an open architecture and inter-disciplinary approach. Yet Jones also notes that the discipline has struggled to achieve a wider impact, in part because of methodological under-development. He discusses 3 alternative futures for the discipline. (1) which he rejects, is a continuing growth of research domains to create a diffuse "business history of everything." (2) is a re-integration with the sister discipline of economic history, which has strongly recovered from its near-extinction 2 decades ago through a renewed attention to globalization and the Great Divergence between the West and the Rest. (3) which he supports, is that business historians retain a distinct identity by building on their proud tradition of deep engagement with empirical evidence by raising the bar in methodology and focusing on big issues for which many scholars, practitioners and students seek answers. He identifies 4 such big issues related to debates on entrepreneurship, globalization, business and the natural environment, and the social and political responsibility of business.
article  economic_history  economic_sociology  business_history  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business-ethics  globalization  MNCs  methodology  environment  climate-adaptation  entrepreneurs  CSR  paywall 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Ma Yuge and Joel Sandhu - Making Sense of China and India’s Low-Carbon Pathways | Global Policy Journal 16th September 2014
China and India’s low-carbon development is crucial for global sustainability and domestic welfare. However, embedded political and economic obstacles have prevented a smooth and effective transition towards a low-carbon future in the two emerging countries. This article analyzes China and India’s energy efficiency policies as a lens into this question. We argue that the existing energy efficiency and broader low-carbon development pathways – India’s market-oriented approach and China’s target-driven paradigm – are not sufficient to address the challenges. Policymakers should reflect on and fix the shortcomings of the current pathways by paying close attention to the various forms of maneuvers of low-carbon policies in the given political and economic environments in China and India. -- part of Global Policy "Juxtaposition" program re comparative work on China and India -- didn't download paper
paper  IR  global_governance  environment  climate  energy  China  India  development  green_economy  local_government  central_government 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Kendal, Jamshid J. Tehrani and John Odling-Smee - Human niche construction in interdisciplinary focus | Royal Society - Theme Issue "Human Niche Construction" Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 27 March 2011, vol. 366, no. 1566, 785-792
doi: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0306 Jeremy Kendal1 and Jamshid J. Tehrani - Centre for the Coevolution of Biology and Culture, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham -- John Odling-Smee - School of Anthropology, University of Oxford -- Issue introduction -- Niche construction is an endogenous causal process in evolution, reciprocal to the causal process of natural selection. It works by adding ecological inheritance, comprising the inheritance of natural selection pressures previously modified by niche construction, to genetic inheritance in evolution. Human niche construction modifies selection pressures in environments in ways that affect both human evolution, and the evolution of other species. Human ecological inheritance is exceptionally potent because it includes the social transmission and inheritance of cultural knowledge, and material culture. Human genetic inheritance in combination with human cultural inheritance thus provides a basis for gene–culture coevolution, and multivariate dynamics in cultural evolution. Niche construction theory potentially integrates the biological and social aspects of the human sciences. We elaborate on these processes, and provide brief introductions to each of the papers published in this theme issue. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  evolution  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  sociobiology  human_nature  genetics  gene-culture_coevolution  niche_construction  ecology  species  environment  social_theory  social_process  change-social  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
John Irons and Isaac Shapiro - Report: Regulation, employment, and the economy: Fears of job loss are overblown | Economic Policy Institute - April 2011
After the first midterms debacle -- . In the first months since the new Congress convened, the House has held dozens of hearings designed to elicit criticisms of regulations, introduced legislation that would dramatically alter the regulatory process by requiring congressional approval of all major regulations, and passed a spending bill that would slash the funding levels of regulatory agencies and restrict their ability to enact rules covering areas such as greenhouse gas emissions. (..) opponents of regulation argue that agency rules are damaging to the economy in general and job generation in particular. Some say specific regulations will destroy millions of jobs and cite a study (critiqued later in this paper) purporting to show that regulations cost $1.75 trillion per year. Regulations are frequently discussed only in the context of their threat to job creation, while their role in protecting lives, public health, and the environment is ignored. This report reviews whether the evidence backs the perspective of regulatory opponents. The first section looks broadly at the effects of regulations, whether they play a useful role in the economy, and whether their overall benefits outweigh their overall costs. The second section assesses the theory and evidence for the assertion that regulations undermine jobs and the economy. The last section examines the kinds of studies that are discussed when regulations are being formulated; these studies, often cited in debates and therefore of great importance, tend to be prospective
estimates of the effects of proposed regulations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_politics  Obama_administration  Congress  GOP  deregulation  cost-benefit  unemployment  business_influence  public_policy  public_goods  public_health  environment  climate  financial_regulation  US_government  regulation  regulation-environment  regulation-costs  common_good  commons  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economic_culture  statistics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
François Jarrige, « E. P. Thompson, une vie de combat » | La Vie des idées, 6 janvier 2015
Grand historien de la classe ouvrière anglaise, figure intellectuelle majeure des débats sur le marxisme dans les années 1960-1970, militant antinucléaire à l’origine d’une critique écologiste du capitalisme : tels furent les visages multiples d’Edward Palmer Thompson, dont l’œuvre continue d’imprégner en profondeur l’ensemble des sciences sociales. -- the French are (re)discovering Thompson and his particular version of a Marxian approach that was highly allergic to Theory. -- extensive footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  historians  historians-and-politics  historiography  historiography-postWWII  20thC  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  working_class  Thompson_EP  moral_economy  morality-conventional  norms  Industrial_Revolution  Marxist  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  Marxism  industrialization  Whigs-oligarchy  property_rights  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  environment  sustainability  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones (HBS Working Papers 2013) - Debating the Responsibility of Capitalism in Historical and Global Perspective
This working paper examines the evolution of concepts of the responsibility of business in a historical and global perspective. It shows that from the nineteenth century American, European, Japanese, Indian and other business leaders discussed the responsibilities of business beyond making profits, although until recently such views have not been mainstream. There was also a wide variation concerning the nature of this responsibility. This paper argues that four factors drove such beliefs: spirituality; self-interest; fears of government intervention; and the belief that governments were incapable of addressing major social issues.

Keywords: Rachel Carson; Sustainability; Local Food; Operations Management; Supply Chain; Business And Society; Business Ethics; Business History; Corporate Philanthropy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility And Impact; Environmentalism; Environmental Entrepreneurship; Environmental And Social Sustainability; Ethics; Globalization; History; Religion; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Energy Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Forest Products Industry; Green Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Asia; Europe; Latin America; Middle East; North and Central America; Africa
paper  downloaded  economic_history  business_history  imperialism  US  British_Empire  France  Germany  Japan  Spain  Dutch  Latin_America  Ottoman_Empire  India  18thC  19thC  20thC  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  business  busisness-ethics  business-and-politics  common_good  communitarian  environment  labor  patriarchy  paternalism  labor_standards  regulation  product_safety  inequality  comparative_economics  capital_as_power  capitalism  CSR  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_sociology  self-interest  ideology 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Lori Wallach & Ben Beachy - Eyes on Trade: Defending Foreign Corporations' Privileges Is Hard, Especially When Looking At The Facts - Nov 11 2014
Forbes just published this response from Lori Wallach and Ben Beachy (GTW director and research director) to a counterfactual Forbes opinion piece by John Brinkley in support of investor-state dispute settlement. Even those who support the controversial idea of a parallel legal system for foreign corporations, known as investor-state dispute settlement or ISDS, likely cringed at John Brinkley’s recent attempt to defend that system. (“Trade Dispute Settlement: Much Ado About Nothing,” October 16.) In trying to justify trade agreement provisions that provide special rights and privileges to foreign firms to the disadvantage of their domestic competitors, Brinkley wrote 24 sentences with factual assertions. Seventeen of them were factually wrong.
US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  cross-border  treaties  ISDS  free_trade  trade-policy  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  fast_track  US_trade_agreements  international_law  property_rights  property-confiscations  competition  Congress  consumer_protection  environment  FDI  investor-State_disputes  investment-bilateral_treaties  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Brayden G King and Nicholas A. Pearce - The Contentiousness of Markets: Politics, Social Movements, and Institutional Change in Markets | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 36 (2010), pp. 249-267
While much of economic sociology focuses on the stabilizing aspects of markets, the social movement perspective emphasizes the role that contentiousness plays in bringing institutional change and innovation to markets. Markets are inherently political, both because of their ties to the regulatory functions of the state and because markets are contested by actors who are dissatisfied with market outcomes and who use the market as a platform for social change. Research in this area focuses on the pathways to market change pursued by social movements, including direct challenges to corporations, the institutionalization of systems of private regulation, and the creation of new market categories through institutional entrepreneurship. Much contentiousness, while initially disruptive, works within the market system by producing innovation and restraining capitalism from destroying the resources it depends on for survival. -- still paywall -- 155 references-- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  social_theory  political_sociology  economic_sociology  markets-structure  markets_in_everything  Innovation  social_movements  conflict  political_economy  regulation  capitalism  environment  institutional_change  social_process  change-social  CSR  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  self-regulation  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Rowland and Jan-Hendrik Passoth - review essay - Infrastructure and the state in science and technology studies | Installing (Social) Order June 2014
Our new article in Social Studies of Science about infrastructure and the state in contemporary STS books. It is ON-LINE FIRST so it is free to one and all (at least, for now). It is a relatively short piece, but the introduction and conclusion captures some of our emerging ideas. As a review article/essay, we review a series of books (rather than one), which include: 1. Andrew Barry, Material Politics: Disputes along the Pipeline (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013) *-* 2. Jo Guldi, Roads to Power: Britain Invents the Infrastructure State (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012), 297 pp., *-* 3. Allan Mazur, Energy and Electricity in Industrial Nations: The Sociology and Technology of Energy (London: Routledge, 2013) xvii + 227 pp., *-* 4. Sara B Pritchard, Confluence: The Nature of Technology and the Remaking of the Rhône (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011) xvii + 371 pp. -- downloaded pdf to Note from Academia.edu
article  books  reviews  sociology_of_science_&_technology  state-and-science  state-and-technology  infrastructure  politics-and-science  politics-and-technology  energy  energy-markets  environment  industrialization  water  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Adaptation Tool Kit: Sea-Level Rise and Coastal Land Use | Georgetown Climate Center
The Adaptation Tool Kit explores 18 different land-use tools that can be used to preemptively respond to the threats posed by sea-level rise to both public and private coastal development and infrastructure, and strives to assist governments in determining which tools to employ to meet their unique socio-economic and political contexts. To this end, the tool kit also provides policymakers with a framework for decision making. Each tool is analyzed by (1) the type of power exercised to implement it (planning, regulatory, spending, or tax and market-based tools); (2) the policy objective that it facilitates (protection, accommodation, planned retreat, or preservation); and (3) the type of existing or potential land uses that the tool can be used to adapt (critical infrastructure, existing development, developable lands, and non-developable lands). A top level analysis of the trade-offs between tools—the economic, environmental, and social costs and benefits, and the legal and administrative feasibility of implementing each tool—is also provided. -- didn't download
local_government  land_use_planning  infrastructure  climate  ocean  coastal_development  regulation-environment  incentives  property_rights  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  law-and-economics  law-and-environment  environment  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  technical_assistance  political_economy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Preparing Our Communities for Climate Impacts: Recommendations for Federal Action | Georgetown Climate Center - September 2014
The Georgetown Climate Center released 100 recommendations today to improve federal programs that could be used to prepare for climate change. The new report will inform the White House State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.The report draws from a series of workshops with leading federal, state and local officials and builds upon lessons learned post-disaster in New Orleans (following Hurricane Katrina), New York (Hurricane Sandy) and Vermont (Hurricane Irene). The report identifies more than 30 federal programs, initiatives and laws that can be used to prepare for extreme events such as storms, floods and heat waves as well as rising seas. Although state and local governments will be the primary actors when it comes to preparing for climate change impacts, the federal government can boost – or impede – preparedness. The federal government sends billions of dollars to states and communities every year, some of which could be used more effectively to adapt to climate change. Federal laws and regulations also can be important drivers of state and local action. But, in some cases, federal rules have hindered state and local innovation. The recommendations in the report explore how existing federal dollars, programs, regulations and policies can be retooled, repurposed and deployed to promote and remove barriers to adaptation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  local_government  state_government  disaster  climate  risk-mitigation  environment  administrative_agencies  ocean  coordination-governments  regulation  cross-border  federalism  public_finance  infrastructure  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Home - UNEP Division of Global Environment Facility Coordination (DGEF)
UNEP is an Implementing Agency of the GEF with the World Bank and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and is the only GEF Agency whose core business is the environment. UNEP plays a key role in supporting countries to develop and execute GEF projects that fit within its comparative advantage. UNEP’s comparative advantage within the GEF has been defined as: ** Scientific assessments, monitoring, early warning; ** Linking science to policy (Capacity Building, Enabling Activities) at national, regional and global levels; ** Innovation, technology transfer and lifting barriers; ** Regional and global cooperation; ** Awareness raising, advocacy, and Knowledge Management
website  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  UNDP  green_economy  green_finance  climate  environment  technology_transfer  technical_assistance  institution-building  global_governance 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Smart Track Can't Be Fast Track in Disguise - Citizens Trade Campaign
FastTrackinDisguiseNearly 600 organizations, together representing millions of Americans, have sent a joint letter to Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-OR) expressing their steadfast opposition to Fast Track and outlining the minimum requirements for a new, democratic and accountable trade policy-making process. Earlier this year, Senator Wyden announced he is working on new “Smart Track” legislation to replace the expired Fast Track process that allows harmful trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) to be rushed through Congress circumventing ordinary review, amendment and debate procedures. The sign-on letter promoted by CTC members such as the Sierra Club, Communications Workers of America, the Teamsters and Public Citizen, among others both inside and outside CTC, urges that Fast Track be eliminated and replaced with a new model of trade authority that includes transparency in trade negotiations, a Congressional role in selecting trade partners, a clear set of negotiating mandates and Congressional certification that mandates have been met before negotiations can conclude. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  Congress  trade-policy  trade-agreements  unions  climate  environment  transparency  civil_society  grassroots  MNCs  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  international_political_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Green Bond Principles 2014: Voluntary Process Guidelines for Issuing Green Bonds — Ceres
Green Bonds enable capital-raising and investment for new and existing projects with environmental benefits. Recent activity indicates that the market for Green Bonds is developing rapidly. The Green Bond Principles (GBP) are voluntary process guidelines that recommend transparency and disclosure and promote integrity in the development of the Green Bond market by clarifying the approach for issuance of a Green Bond. The GBP are intended for broad use by the market: they provide issuers guidance on the key components involved in launching a credible Green Bond; they aid investors by ensuring availability of information necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of their Green Bond investments; and they assist underwriters by moving the market towards standard disclosures which will facilitate transactions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
green_economy  green_finance  reform-economic  reform-finance  climate  capital_markets  investors  environment  disclosure  financial_innovation  standards-sustainability  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lant Pritchett -The Politics of Penurious Poverty Lines (Part II) Strange Bedfellows | Center For Global Development September 2014
Re unholy alliance in US, Europe and Japan between advocates for the destitute, fiscal realists and post-materialists -- I argue the success of the "advocates for the destitute" is the result of a coalition of strange bedfellows that actually bring the political heft in rich countries and use the rhetoric of the "advocates" as cover. The fiscal realists and post-materialists like penurious poverty lines not because they put more attention on the poor [the advocates' rationalization of using the poorest of the poor as a PR target], but because they take income gains to everyone else off the table by making a small deal of big differences in incomes between the “middle class” in Ethiopia or India and those of the rich countries. Reframing the “center” of the development agenda around an arbitrary poverty measure that eliminates 5 billion people from “development” is a political master-stroke for the fiscal realists. The advocates of penurious poverty lines create political space for fiscal realists to posture as “pro-development” (and not just hard-hearted or fiscally strapped) while arguing that “development assistance” hasn’t gone to “the poor” (by this new arbitrary measure) and hence with “focus,” agencies need less resources. “Extreme poverty” is a boon for post-materialists in promoting their goals as it manages to take the concerns of large majorities in developing countries in favor of rapid material progress (prioritized at their existing material conditions over other legitimate goals) off the table as their income gains don’t “count” as development progress as they are not “poor.”
post-2015_agenda  development  poverty  global_governance  emerging_markets  OECD_economies  aid  conservatism  values  environment  sustainability  welfare  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  middle_class  international_organizations  UN 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Harold Meyerson - The Revolt of the Cities The American Prospect - August 2014
20 years ago, half of America’s dozen largest cities had Republican mayors. -- of the nation’s 30 largest cities, just 4 (San Diego, Indianapolis, Fort Worth, and Oklahoma City) have Republican mayors, and even they have to swim with the urban tides. -- Demographic recomposition has proved a necessary but insufficient prerequisite for urban political change. The newcomers to America’s cities also have had to come together as an effective political force. With few exceptions, the cities that have elected left-populist governments have first reconfigured their power structures by building coalitions dedicated to greater economic and racial equity. Aided in some instances by liberal foundations, these coalitions consist chiefly of unions, community-based organizations in low-income minority neighborhoods, immigrants’ rights groups, affordable-housing advocates, environmental organizations, and networks of liberal churches, synagogues, and mosques. The unions that have been key to the formation of these new coalitions—it’s labor, after all, that has the capacity to provide the lion’s share of funding for these ventures—generally aren’t the municipal employee locals that have a bargaining relationship with elected officials that can limit their freedom of political action. They tend, rather, to be unions of private-sector workers—janitors, hotel housekeepers, hospital orderlies, supermarket clerks. Their members and potential members are often overwhelmingly minority and substantially immigrant. Indeed, the growing importance of these unions coincides with the growth of immigrants’ rights groups in most major cities. -- What’s happening in cities can be described as Obama’s agenda trickling down to the jurisdictions where it has enough political support to be enacted—but it’s also the incubation of policies and practices that will trickle up. With considerable creativity and limited power, the new urban regimes are seeking to diminish the inequality so apparent in cities and so pervasive nationwide. They are mapping the future of liberalism until the day when the national government can bring it to scale.
US_politics  local_government  local_politics  unions  immigration  wages  green_economy  inequality  housing  education  environment  coalitions-progressive  cities  grassroots  parties  progressivism  Obama_administration  state_government  blue_states  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Bing Yan - China’s Actions to cut Carbon Emissions | Lindau Blog August 2014
China’s next 5 year plan is very ambitious re reducing carbon intensity of production and urban pollution and energy consumption - blog post fairly upbeat re China being able to use technologies and new methods for planning and monitoring policy outcomes, and what the Chinese are able to accomplish will make all the difference between manageable and catastrophic globally -- What makes a methodology stand out is its orientation towards actions. After all, having a transparent, accurate carbon counting method is only the first step toward any climate change solution. For example, a methodology that I would recommend for China is called Bilan Carbone, developed by the French inter-ministerial department Agence De l’Environnement et de la Maitrise de l’Energie (Environment and Energy Management Agency). It has an integrated process for setting reduction targets, through which reduction actions can be directly derived from emission calculations. Best practices for implementation from various cities and regions are available online and learning can be easily shared among city governors. On the practical side, there is an additional tool called Territorial Climate and Energy Plan, which can link Carbon Balance with policy enforcement
China  environment  climate  energy  urban_politics  industrialization 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"Toward an Ecology of Intellectual Property: Lessons from Environmental" by Frank Pasquale | 8 Yale Journal of Law and Technology 78 (2006)
Keywords -- copyright, intellectual property, environmental, economics -- The fair use defense in copyright law shields an intellectual commons of protected uses of copyrighted material from infringement actions. In determining whether a given use is fair, courts must assess the new use's potential effect on the market for the copyrighted work. Fair use jurisprudence too often fails to address the complementary, network, and long-range effects of new technologies on the market for copyrighted works. These effects parallel the indirect, direct, and option values of biodiversity recently recognized by environmental economists. Their sophisticated methods for valuing natural resources in tangible commons can inform legal efforts to address the intellectual commons' effect on the market for copyrighted works. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  legal_theory  IP  copyright  Internet  political_economy  economic_theory  environment  commons  property  property_rights  networks-information  technology  valuation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Carlo Carraro, Marianne Fay, Marzio Galeotti - Greening Economics: It is time | vox 26 April 2014
The concept of environmental capital is throughly entrenched in policy dicussions but largely missing from mainstream economic curriculums... Environmental economists have long modified growth models to account for the role of the environment, thus revisiting the conditions that ensure growth, whether sustainable or sustained. Classical references are three 1974 articles by Partha Dasgupta and Geoffrey Heal, by William Nordhaus, and by Robert Solow (though Solow could be hardly defined an environmental economist). More generally, existing work is summarised in the survey chapters by Tasos Xepapadeas and by William Brock and Scott Taylor, both published in 2005. A more recent example that compares ‘traditional’ (brown?) and ‘green’ models of growth is a 2011 World Bank working paper by Stephane Hallegatte, Geoffrey Heal, Marianne Fay, and David Treguer. As a result, environmental economists tend not to talk about economic growth per se, but about sustainable economic growth. When macroeconomists refer to sustainable growth, however, they usually mean sustained growth. When growth economists study the role of externalities in the growth process they almost exclusively refer to technological and knowledge externalities, and generally ignore environmental ones, even though the latter are likely to become largely more relevant in the coming decades. Even social capital, a relative newcomer in economics, appears better integrated into the growth literature.
economic_theory  economic_growth  environment  natural_capital  social_capital  technology 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Sandra Shapshay, review - Emily Brady, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
Review good on cognitive dimension in Kant compared with Burke about which Shapshay has written zz In this book Emily Brady seeks to 'reassess' and 'reclaim' the concept of the sublime in order to show the continuing relevance of this aesthetic category for debates in contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought. This aim is important, and it is one with which I have great sympathy. In recent years the concept has been used, on the one hand, too liberally by postmodern philosophers who have stretched 'the sublime' beyond conceptual coherence, and, on the other hand, too little by Anglo-American philosophers who have largely forgotten this aesthetic category. ..sublime responses, especially to natural environments, are still with us today, and may be even more frequent than in former times given that "Places that were once distant and inaccessible have become much closer through adventure tourism and the like." In addition, Brady supports the claim that contemporary tastes in landscapes have not changed radically since the 18th century .... -- The book is divided into two roughly equal parts. In Part I, Brady aims to characterize the core meaning of the sublime by tracing its development from the rhetorical sublime of Longinus into a category largely of nature appreciation in the 18th century with the aesthetic theories of Addison, Gerard, Burke, and Alison (in Britain) and Mendelssohn and Kant (in Germany). In Chapter 4 she continues the narrative with subsequent developments of the category of the sublime affected by Schiller, Schopenhauer and British Romanticism. In Part II, Brady considers the relevance of this core meaning of the sublime she derives from the history of aesthetic theory for contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought, taking up the following questions. Can artworks be sublime in a non-derivative sense? What distinguishes the sublime from neighboring categories such as 'grandeur,' 'terrible beauty,' and 'wonder'? How does sublime response compare with an engagement with tragedy? And what is the relevance of the sublime for valuing the environment both aesthetically and ethically?
books  reviews  intellectual_history  21stC  aesthetics  environment  nature  sublime  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  British_history  German_Idealism  Germany  Addison  Burke  Kant-aesthetics  Schiller  Schopenhauer  Romanticism  Grand_Tour  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
The Difference that Nature Makes: Empire and Natural History in Contemporary Political Theory by Mauro Caraccioli :: SSRN
Contemporary political theory’s interest in empire seems bounded by its encounter and current fascination with liberalism. What role then, if any, does nature have in political theory’s turn to empire? In this paper, I engage the status of empire and nature in political theory, pointing to the difference that turning to the early modern Spanish encounter with nature makes in studying the history of political thought. I argue that in the early accounts of Spanish ethnographers, cartographers, and natural philosophers with the New World environment, one finds the origins of crucial debates over the boundaries of nature, society, and the formation of modern empire. Nature was not so much the setting, as it was the means through which modern imperial projects were made possible. My contention is that greater attention to the experiences emerging from Spanish naturalist writings contributes to further reconstructing many of the debates found at the origins of early modern political thought. Striking amongst these debates is the boundary between nature and society as marking the rise of modern civilization and science. The value added to political theory by turning towards these fields consists of broadening Enlightenment metanarratives on the origins of modernity, while carving out a space for first-hand accounts on early modern changes in nature-society interaction.
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  empires  Europe-Early_Modern  Spanish_Empire  ecology  nature  territory  environment  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
NATHANIEL WOLLOCH - Edward Gibbon's Cosmology | JSTOR: International Journal of the Classical Tradition, Vol. 17, No. 2 (JUNE 2010), pp. 165-177
This article is a study of Edward Gibbon's view of the human mastery and cultivation of nature as a sign of cultural progress. It examines the sources of Gibbon's views on this issue, and specifically the influence of the traditional Western anthropocentric cosmology on his historiographical interpretations. Gibbon's views on the command of nature are highlighted as forming a central part of his general historiographical and philosophical world view. He is depicted as situating the common early modern praise of mastering nature within a distinctly historiographical context. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  historiography-18thC  Gibbon  progress  Western_civ  nature-mastery  natural_history  Enlightenment_Project  environment  eco-theology  cosmology  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Politics of Systems and Environments, Part II -- TOC | JSTOR: Cultural Critique, No. 31, Autumn, 1995
(1) Introduction (pp. 5-6) William Rasch and Cary Wolfe. *-- (2) Theory of a Different Order: A Conversation with Katherine Hayles and Niklas Luhmann (pp. 7-36) Katherine Hayles, Niklas Luhmann, William Rasch, Eva Knodt and Cary Wolfe. *-- (3) The Paradoxy of Observing Systems (pp. 37-55) Niklas Luhmann. *-- (4) On Environmentality: Geo-Power and Eco-Knowledge in the Discourses of Contemporary Environmentalism (pp. 57-81) Timothy W. Luke. *-- (4) The Autonomy of Affect (pp. 83-109) Brian Massumi. *-- (5) Pre- and Post-Dialectical Materialisms: Modeling Praxis without Subjects and Objects (pp. 111-127) Marjorie Levinson. *-- (6) Adorno, Ellison, and the Critique of Jazz (pp. 129-158) James M. Harding. *-' (7) The Signifying Corpse: Re-Reading Kristeva on Marguerite Duras (pp. 159-177) Karen Piper. *-- (8) Empowerment Through Information: A Discursive Critique (pp. 179-196) Marie-Christine Leps
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  systems_theory  epistemology-social  environment  geopolitics  geography  affect  materialism  Luhmann  Adorno  information  political_participation  subject  objectivity  paradox  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Jenner - The Politics of London Air John Evelyn's Fumifugium and the Restoration | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 535-551
Historians have commonly described John Evelyn's pamphlet about London smoke pollution, Fumifugium, as a precocious example of environmental concern. This paper argues that such an interpretation is too simple. Evelyn's proposals are shown to be closely related to political allegory and the panegyrics written to welcome the newly restored Charles II. However, the paper also shows that Fumifugium was not simply a literary conceit; rather it exemplified the mid-seventeenth-century English interest in the properties of air that is visible in both the Hartlib circle and the early Royal Society. --didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  political_culture  history_of_science  British_history  Restoration  environment  London  pollution  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  Hartlib_Circle  Royal_Society  Evelyn  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Drèze, J. and Sen, A.: An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. | Princeton University Press
Book page with TOC etc -- Maintaining rapid as well as environmentally sustainable growth remains an important and achievable goal for India. In An Uncertain Glory, two of India's leading economists argue that the country's main problems lie in the lack of attention paid to the essential needs of the people, especially of the poor, and often of women. There have been major failures both to foster participatory growth and to make good use of the public resources generated by economic growth to enhance people's living conditions. There is also a continued inadequacy of social services such as schooling and medical care as well as of physical services such as safe water, electricity, drainage, transportation, and sanitation. In the long run, even the feasibility of high economic growth is threatened by the underdevelopment of social and physical infrastructure and the neglect of human capabilities, in contrast with the Asian approach of simultaneous pursuit of economic growth and human development, as pioneered by Japan, South Korea, and China.In a democratic system, which India has great reason to value, addressing these failures requires not only significant policy rethinking by the government, but also a clearer public understanding of the abysmal extent of social and economic deprivations in the country. The deep inequalities in Indian society tend to constrict public discussion, confining it largely to the lives and concerns of the relatively affluent. Drèze and Sen present a powerful analysis of these deprivations and inequalities as well as the possibility of change through democratic practice.
books  India  political_economy  political_culture  climate  environment  inequality  democracy  globalization  economic_growth  economic_reform 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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