dunnettreader + enlightened_absolutism + philosophes   2

Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Annelien De Dijn - The Politics of Enlightenment: From Peter Gay to Jonathan Israel | Academia.edu - The Historical Journal (2012)
ANNELIEN de DIJN (2012). THE POLITICS OF ENLIGHTENMENT: FROM PETER GAY TO JONATHAN ISRAEL. The Historical Journal,55, pp 785-805 doi:10.1017/S0018246X12000301 -- Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/HIS -- According to the textbook version of history, the Enlightenment played a crucial role in the creation of the modern, liberal democracies of the West. Ever since this view – which we might describe as the modernization thesis – was first formulated by Gay, it has been repeatedly criticized as misguided: a myth. Yet, as this paper shows, it continues to survive in postwar historiography, in particular in the Anglophone world. Indeed, Gay's most important and influential successors – historians such as Darnton and Porter – all ended up defending the idea that the Enlightenment was a major force in the creation of modern democratic values and institutions. More recently, Israel's trilogy has revived the modernization thesis, albeit in a dramatic new form. Yet, even Israel's work, as its critical reception highlights, does not convincingly demonstrate that the Enlightenment, as an intellectual movement, contributed in any meaningful way to the creation of modern political culture. This conclusion raises a new question: if the Enlightenment did not create our modern democracies, then what did it do? In answer to that question, this paper suggests that we should take more seriously the writings of enlightened monarchists like Nicolas-Antoine Boulanger. Studying the Enlightenment might not allow us to understand why democratic political culture came into being. But, as Boulanger's work underscores, it might throw light on an equally important problem: why democracy came so late in the day. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  historiography  modernization_theory  democracy  Ancien_régime  philosophes  monarchy  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  monarchists  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  government-forms  Boulanger_Nicholas-Antoine  historiography-19thC  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolution  enlightened_absolutism  political_culture  democratization  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader

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