dunnettreader + energy   66

CEEPR - Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research at MIT (MIT Energy Initiative, Economics Dept & Sloan School)
Since 1977, the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) has been a focal point for research on energy and environmental policy at MIT. CEEPR promotes rigorous, objective research for improved decision making in government and the private sector, and secures the relevance of its work through close cooperation with industry partners from around the globe. CEEPR is jointly sponsored at MIT by the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), the Department of Economics, and the Sloan School of Management. Financial support comes from a variety of sources, including state and federal government research funds, foundation grants and contributions from our corporate and government Associates
website  think-tank  energy  energy-markets  energy-transition  climate  climate-policy  climate-adaptation  climate-diplomacy 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
P Aghion, C Hepburn, A Teytelboym, D Zenghelis - Path dependence, innovation and the economics of climate change (Policy Report 2014) | Grantham Research Institute on climate change and the environment
Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy at London School of Economics and Political Science.
The authors of the report – Professor Philippe Aghion (Harvard University), Professor Cameron Hepburn (University of Oxford), Dr Alexander Teytelboym (University of Oxford) and Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE)Innovation is required to transform our fossil-fuelled economy into a clean, low-carbon economy. But economic models of climate change have overlooked the role of innovation. By taking innovation fully into account, a whole new set of policy conclusions are drawn. This report finds that the longer governments wait to promote clean energy innovation, the greater the eventual cost to the environment and the economy. Increased public support for clean innovation should therefore be a priority. Government policies to promote low-carbon innovation may only need to be in place for a limited time because, once a low-carbon pathway has been kick-started, the economy will become ‘locked-in’ to that low-carbon pathway with no further intervention needed. -- downloaded via Air - added to Evernote
paper  downloaded  Evernote  climate  Innovation  green_economy  green_finance  path-dependence  technology  innovation-government-supported  infrastructure  renewables  economic_growth  economic_sociology  economic_policy  energy  energy-markets 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Energy consumption in England
The displacement of the centre of the European economy from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic and the beginning of north–south divergence in Europe has been discussed on the basis of data on real wages, urbanization rates, and, more recently, estimates of gross domestic product for a number of European countries. The purpose of the present article is to contribute to this line of research with the elaboration of yearly series of total energy consumption in Italy and England for the long period 1560–1913. New data on energy services, energy intensity, and, finally, social savings from the use of energy are also presented and discussed for both Italy and England.These new data allow us to specify that energy played a central role.Yet it was relatively late that its importance as a provider of mechanical work developed fully; that is, from 1830 onwards in England and from the end of the nineteenth century in Italy. - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  economic_growth  pre-WWI  17thC  transport  manufacturing  energy  modernization  18thC  industrialization  energy-transition  energy-markets  Industrial_Revolution  economic_history  Italy  consumption  downloaded  19thC  article  energy-intensity  British_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
James Dyke - Meltdown Earth: the shocking reality of climate change kicks in – but who is listening? - The Conversation - March 2016
And another one bites the dust. The year 2014 was the warmest ever recorded by humans. Then 2015 was warmer still. January 2016 broke the record for the largest monthly temperature anomaly. Then came last month.

February didn’t break climate change records – it obliterated them. Regions of the Arctic were were more than 16℃ warmer than normal – whatever constitutes normal now. But what is really making people stand up and notice is that the surface of the Earth north of the equator was 2℃ warmer than pre-industrial temperatures. This was meant to be a line that must not be crossed.
Pocket  climate  climate-denialism  US_politics  GOP  climate-models  climate-adaptation  energy  Arctic  from pocket
march 2016 by dunnettreader
John Quiggin - Peak paper | Crooked Timber Feb 2016
I’ve recently published a piece in Aeon, looking at the peak in global paper use, which occurred a couple of years ago, and arguing that this is an indication…
Instapaper  economic_growth  economy-structure  industry  industrialization  commodities  Information_Economy  productivity  production  natural_resources  energy  energy-markets  environment  climate  consumption  international_political_economy  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Revisiting the relationship between oil prices and costs in the upstream industry - VoxEU Feb 2016
Price goes up, and with a lag, the exploration and extraction costs go up, though by less than the price increase
Pocket  energy  energy-markets  oil_price  climate  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Olivier Geden - Pragmatism in Climate Policy | Project Syndicate - Nov 2015
Re environmental activists finally openly recognizing top-down binding negotiations have been and will continue to be guaranteed to fail
Pocket  international_political_economy  international_organizations  multilateralism  UN  diplomacy-environment  climate  energy  environment  grassroots  from pocket
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Lumière, lumières - Collège de France - 15 octobre 2015 09:30
Depuis la nuit des temps, la lumière a fasciné et inquiété les humains. Dans l’Antiquité, les cultes solaires étaient importants, et les historiens des religions du XIXe siècle leur ont donné une plus grande importance encore, au point de vouloir comprendre toutes les divinités antiques comme des métaphores du soleil. Très rapidement aussi, les humains ont tenté d’expliquer les manifestations de la lumière, révélées en particulier par la pratique de l’astronomie, en proposant des théories diverses qui ont abouti non seulement à des cosmologies, mais aussi à la physique et aux innombrables applications qui en sont nées. Ainsi, on peut dire que la lumière artificiellement produite ou contrôlée, qu’elle soit visible ou qu'elle soit un rayonnement électromagnétique invisible, est l’une des composantes essentielles d’un grand nombre des technologies d’aujourd’hui. À côté de ces développements scientifiques, les penseurs européens du XVIIIe siècle ont recouru à la métaphore de la lumière pour définir une démarche intellectuelle ayant pour fin d’éclairer les esprits (Lumières, Enlightenment, Aufklärung), alors que la création artistique n’a cessé de mettre en oeuvre la lumière ou l’obscurité dans la représentation ou la transfiguration de la réalité. -- program pdf to Dropbox
astronomy  intellectual_history  video  biology  Collège_deFrance  nanotechnology  history_of_science  lecture  cosmology  Enlightenment  physics  energy  French_Enlightenment  vision 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
David Roberts - The transformative potential of self-driving electric cars | Vox - Sept 2015
Reimagining urbanization and lived environment that exploits the huge amount of land currently devoted to cars to handle far more population without changing lived experience of density
Pocket  futurology  environment  self-driving_cars  automation  IT  urban_development  urbanism  land_use_planning  transport  cities  energy  from pocket
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Love - OECD Report: Fostering Investing in infrastructure | OECD Insights Blog - 24 June 2015
According to the OECD’s Fostering Investment in Infrastructure, it’s going to cost a lot to keep the thrifty housewives across the globe happy over the next 15 years: $71 trillion, or about 3.5% of annual world GDP from 2007 to 2030 for transport, electricity, water, and telecommunications. The Newport railway was privately financed, as was practically all railway construction in Britain at the time, but in the 20th century, governments gradually took the leading role in infrastructure projects. In the 21st century, given the massive sums involved and the state of public finances after the crisis, the only way to get the trillions needed is to call on private funds. -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  OECD  infrastructure  infrastructure-markets  public-private_partnerships  project_finance  public_goods  public_finance  green_finance  green_economy  LDCs  emerging_markets  OECD_economies  energy  energy-markets  telecommunications  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  FDI  water  urban_development  public_health  economic_growth  economic_reform  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
CDP - About us
CDP works to transform the way the world does business to prevent dangerous climate change and protect our natural resources. We see a world where capital is efficiently allocated to create long-term prosperity rather than short-term gain at the expense of our environment.

Evidence and insight is vital to driving real change. We use the power of measurement and information disclosure to improve the management of environmental risk. By leveraging market forces including shareholders, customers and governments, CDP has incentivized thousands of companies and cities across the world’s largest economies to measure and disclose their environmental information. We put this information at the heart of business, investment and policy decision making.

We hold the largest collection globally of self reported climate change, water and forest-risk data. Through our global system companies, investors and cities are better able to mitigate risk, capitalize on opportunities and make investment decisions that drive action towards a more sustainable world.
website  Lon  risk_management  risk-systemic  climate  climate-adaptation  institutional_investors  disclosure  water  energy  energy-markets  industry  supply_chains  sustainability  corporate_governance  green_finance  green_economy 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Pricing Carbon - Program site | World Bank
Background papers, events, reports etc on carbon pricing methods, markets, integration of markets, internal pricing by businesses etc
website  World_Bank  climate  energy  energy-markets  carbon_pricing  risk_management  local_government  global_governance 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Ma Yuge and Joel Sandhu - Making Sense of China and India’s Low-Carbon Pathways | Global Policy Journal 16th September 2014
China and India’s low-carbon development is crucial for global sustainability and domestic welfare. However, embedded political and economic obstacles have prevented a smooth and effective transition towards a low-carbon future in the two emerging countries. This article analyzes China and India’s energy efficiency policies as a lens into this question. We argue that the existing energy efficiency and broader low-carbon development pathways – India’s market-oriented approach and China’s target-driven paradigm – are not sufficient to address the challenges. Policymakers should reflect on and fix the shortcomings of the current pathways by paying close attention to the various forms of maneuvers of low-carbon policies in the given political and economic environments in China and India. -- part of Global Policy "Juxtaposition" program re comparative work on China and India -- didn't download paper
paper  IR  global_governance  environment  climate  energy  China  India  development  green_economy  local_government  central_government 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Rasmus Karlsson and Jonathan Symons - Making Climate Leadership Meaningful: Energy Research as a Key to Global Decarbonisation - Feb 2015 | Global Policy Journal- Wiley Online Library
This article revisits a number of familiar debates about climate change mitigation yet draws some unorthodox conclusions. First, that progress towards a renewable small-scale energy future in environmentally conscious countries such as Germany and Sweden may take the world as a whole further away from climate stability by reducing the political pressure to finance breakthrough innovation. Second, that without such game-changing innovations, developing countries will continue to deploy whatever technologies are domestically available, scalable and affordable, including thermal coal power in most instances. Third and finally, that as any realistic hope of achieving climate stability hinges on the innovation of breakthrough technologies, the urgency of climate change calls not so much for the domestic deployment of existing energy technologies but rather a concentrated effort to develop technologies that will be adopted globally. These arguments imply that national innovation policy, and an international treaty establishing a ‘Low-Emissions Technology Commitment’ should be the central focus of climate policy. -- added to Wiley profile
article  paywall  Wiley  global_governance  energy  climate  technology  Innovation  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  green_finance  development  IR  IR-domestic_politics  economic_growth  IP-global_governance  innovation-government_policy  industrial_policy  industrialization 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Clause IV [British Labour Party constitution] - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Adopted in 1918, the clause proclaimed that the party endorsed an economy where there was "common ownership" of the means of production. 1944 Labour Party victory seen as a mandate for nationalization, though the party had no well-developed plans. They proceeded rapidly to address major sectors and "commanding heights", starting with the Bank of England, and moving rapidly on: civil aviation in 1946, railways and telecommunications in 1947, along with the creation of the National Coal Board, which was responsible for supplying 90% of UK's energy needs. 1946 also saw the establishment of the National Health Service which came into force in July 1948. Also in 1948 came the nationalisation of railways, canals, road haulage and electricity. By 1951 the iron, steel and gas industries had been brought into public ownership. When they lost the general election of 1959, leader Gaitskell blamed it on nationalization becoming unpopular. It was a topic of ongoing intra-party disputes for the next few decades. Arguing that the text of clause 4 confused ends and means and ignored the necessity of ongoing need to modernize the party's approach as the nature of the economy changed, Blair made the party finally revise the text in 1995 -- seen by pundits as the moment when New Labour finally defeated the old guard, though the new text describes the party as "democratic socialist" thereby retaining "socialist" in the party's "modernized" constitution.
British_history  political_economy  British_politics  20thC  Labour  post-WWII  nationalization  socialism  social_democracy  utilities  transport  health_care  energy  post-Cold_War  Blair_Tony  neoliberalism  Third_Way  unions 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
James Hamilton - Demand factors in the collapse of oil prices | Econbrowser Jan 2015
update of his analysis from a month ago - still sees c. 40% of price declines across commodities from slowing hlobal economy with exception of US
global_economy  US_economy  Eurozone  China  oil_price  economic_growth  energy  consumer_demand  commodities 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Finally Some Good News About Clean Energy Investment | Mother Jones Jan 2015
After 3 year investment decline - BNEF produces quarterly reports that track how much money governments and the private sector are pouring into wind, solar, biofuels and other green energy projects. In 2014, the United States enjoyed its biggest investments since 2012, but it was China that once again drove the numbers. China's clean energy spending shot up 32 percent to a record $89.5 billion, cementing its place as the world's top market for green investment
energy  investment  China  climate 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Nitzan - Global Capital: Political Economy of Capitalist Power (YorkU, Graduate Seminar, Fall Term, 2014-15) | bnarchives
The seminar has two related goals: substantive and pedagogical. The substantive purpose is to tackle the question of capital head on. The course explores a spectrum of liberal and Marxist theories, ideologies and dogmas – as well as a radical alternative to these views. The argument is developed theoretically, historically and empirically. The first part of the seminar provides a critical overview of political economy, examining its historical emergence, triumph and eventual demise. The second part deals with the two ‘materialistic’ schools of capital – the liberal theory of utility and the Marxist theory of labour time – dissecting their structure, strengths and limitations. The third part brings power back in: it analyses the relation between accumulation and sabotage, studies the institutions of the corporation and the state and introduces a new framework – the capitalist mode of power. The final part offers an alternative approach – the theory of capital as power – and illustrates how this approach can shed light on conflict-ridden processes such as corporate merger, stagflation, imperialism and Middle East wars. Pedagogically, the seminar seeks to prepare students toward conducting their own independent re-search. Students are introduced to various electronic data sources, instructed in different methods of analysis and tutored in developing their empirical research skills. As the seminar progresses, these skills are used both to assess various theories and to develop the students’ own theoretical/empirical research projects. -- Keywords: arms accumulation capital capitalism conflict corporation crisis distribution elite energy finance globalization growth imperialism GPE liberalism Marxism military Mumford national interest neoclassical neoliberalism oil ownership peace power profit ruling class security stagflation state stock market technology TNC Veblen violence war -- syllabus and session handouts downloaded pdf to Note
bibliography  syllabus  capital_as_power  international_political_economy  political_economy  economic_theory  liberalism  neoliberalism  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  capital  capitalism  social_theory  power-asymmetric  globalization  financial_system  financial_regulation  risk-systemic  international_finance  finance_capital  financialization  production  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  inequality  MNCs  corporations  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  corporate_control_markets  economic_growth  economic_models  imperialism  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  ruling_class  class_conflict  energy  energy-markets  MENA  accumulation  accumulation-differential  capital_markets  public_finance  profit  investment  technology  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  capitalism-systemic_crisis  Veblen  Mumford  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Dave Johnson - The Cost To Our Economy From Republican Obstruction And Sabotage | Campaign for America's Future - September 2014
After listing key filibusters -- What would it have meant for the economy and jobs to launch a post-stimulus effort to maintain and modernize our infrastructure? How about reversing the tax structure that pays companies to move jobs out of the country? How about equal pay for women? How about a minimum wage increase? How about hundreds of thousands of teachers and first responders going back to work? How about being able to organize into unions to fight for wages, benefits and safer working conditions? How about relief from crushing student loan debt? -- In the House GOP leadership has been following the “Hastert Rule” to obstruct bills that would win with a majority vote. -- So instead of looking at what has been blocked in the House, we should look at what has passed. What has passed is a record of economic sabotage. Noteworthy is the GOP “Path to Prosperity Budget” (“Ryan budget”), described as “Cuts spending & implements pro-growth reforms that boost job creation.” It dramatically cuts taxes on the rich. It privatizes Medicare. It cuts spending on infrastructure, health care for the poor, education, research, public-safety, and low-income programs. It turns Medicaid, food stamps, and other poverty programs into state block grants. And lo and behold, this GOP budget that passed the House cuts taxes and cuts funding for even maintaining – never mind modernizing – our vital infrastructure needs. This is a budget of economic sabotage. Other GOP House “jobs” bills, listed at Boehner’s “jobs” page include: -- horrifyingly awful policies with Orwellian titles or red meat specials -- special attention to keeping oil & gas subsidies flowing and eviserating regulation, especially EPA -- Johnson stresses, the voters are unaware of all this thanks in part to the MSM which is ballanced re political parties, pro business & anti labor, and guilty of mindlessly peddling what Wren-Lewis calls mediamacro. Good links
US_economy  US_politics  Congress  Great_Recession  GOP  unemployment  public_finance  public_goods  state_government  welfare  social_insurance  poverty  infrastructure  Obama_administration  health_care  women-rights  women-work  wages  fiscal_policy  fiscal_drag  taxes  1-percent  energy  climate  regulation-environment  R&D  Senate  House_of_Representatives  polarization  student_debt  education-finance  education-privatization  corporate_tax  labor_law  unions  trickle-down 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Rowland and Jan-Hendrik Passoth - review essay - Infrastructure and the state in science and technology studies | Installing (Social) Order June 2014
Our new article in Social Studies of Science about infrastructure and the state in contemporary STS books. It is ON-LINE FIRST so it is free to one and all (at least, for now). It is a relatively short piece, but the introduction and conclusion captures some of our emerging ideas. As a review article/essay, we review a series of books (rather than one), which include: 1. Andrew Barry, Material Politics: Disputes along the Pipeline (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013) *-* 2. Jo Guldi, Roads to Power: Britain Invents the Infrastructure State (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012), 297 pp., *-* 3. Allan Mazur, Energy and Electricity in Industrial Nations: The Sociology and Technology of Energy (London: Routledge, 2013) xvii + 227 pp., *-* 4. Sara B Pritchard, Confluence: The Nature of Technology and the Remaking of the Rhône (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011) xvii + 371 pp. -- downloaded pdf to Note from Academia.edu
article  books  reviews  sociology_of_science_&_technology  state-and-science  state-and-technology  infrastructure  politics-and-science  politics-and-technology  energy  energy-markets  environment  industrialization  water  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhodium Group » Remaking American Power - Economic Impacts of EPA Guidelines proposal - Preliminary Findings - July 24, 2014
John Larsen, Shashank Mohan, Whitney Ketchum, and Trevor Houser -- On June 2, 2014, the EPA proposed guidelines for states to develop and implement carbon dioxide emissions standards for existing US power plants. These rules will likely bring about the most significant change in the US electricity sector in decades. But regulating GHG emissions from existing power plants will also have important supply-side implications, whether fuel switching from coal to natural gas or expanded production of renewable energy and energy efficiency equipment technology. CSIS and RHG have partnered to do an initial assessment of the economic impact of future emissions standards that accounts for these broader energy market dynamics and maps impacts by region of the country to help inform key regional and industry stakeholders. The study focuses on the changes to the electric power and energy production that are likely to under the EPA’s proposal, as well as price, demand expenditures and other impacts. The analysis provides a balanced and measured set of estimates of national and regional results to inform ongoing policy deliberations both in Washington and in the states. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_government  state_government  energy  energy-markets  public_policy  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Esty - Bottom-Up Climate Fix - NYTimes.com - September 2014
Smart people in the 20th century thought we could tackle climate change with a treaty in which the world’s nations agreed to “targets and timetables” for reducing emissions. These reductions would be implemented by top-down, national mandates and government support for clean energy technologies. But 22 years after the original climate agreement, emissions continue to rise and threats of significant harm loom larger. As one of those who, as an official at the Environmental Protection Agency, negotiated that first United Nations treaty in 1992, I believe we need to shift gears and try something new. Relying on national governments alone to deliver results is not enough, as the last two decades have shown. The real action on climate change around the world is coming from governors, mayors, corporate chief executives and community leaders. They are the ones best positioned to make change happen on the ground. Accordingly, we need to move from a top-down strategy to a bottom-up approach.
global_governance  climate  energy  local_government  nation-state  collective_action  public-private_partnerships  green_economy  green_finance  Innovation  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  treaties  international_political_economy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
350.org
350.org was founded by a group of university friends in the U.S. along with author Bill McKibben, who wrote one of the first books on global warming for the general public. When we started organizing in 2008, we saw climate change as the most important issue facing humanity — but climate action was mired in politics and all but stalled. We didn’t know how to fix things, but we knew that one missing ingredient was a climate movement that reflected the scale of the crisis. So we started organizing coordinated days of action that linked activists and organizations around the world, including the International Day of Climate Action in 2009, the Global Work Party in 2010, Moving Planet in 2011, and Climate Impacts Day in 2012. We held the “world’s biggest art installation” and “the most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history.” We figured that if we were going to be a movement, then we had to start acting like one. Click here to watch videos of these global mobilisations. Today, 350.org works in almost every country in the world on campaigns like fighting coal power plants in India, stopping the Keystone XL pipeline in the U.S, and divesting public institutions everywhere from fossil fuels. All of our work leverages people power to dismantle the influence and infrastructure of the fossil fuel industry, and to develop people-centric solutions to the climate crisis.
grassroots  alt-globalization  climate  energy  science-public  global_governance  global_system  sustainability  green_economy  US_politics  UN  UNEP 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Bill McKibben - Bad news for Obama: Fracking may be worse than burning coal | Grist - 8 Sep 2014
In the official Obama story (one being echoed in Hillary Clinton’s climate talking points), natural gas is a “bridge” to a world of solar and wind power, which isn’t quite ready yet. But in fact, in just the same years that we’ve learned to frack we’ve also learned an awful lot about how to scale up wind and sun. And that means that far from being a bridge, the big investments in natural gas may actually be a breakwater that keeps this new wave of truly clean energy from washing onto our shores. -- natural gas leak problems, both fracking, wells & transport -- EDF is convinced that with tight regulation and constant monitoring and inspection, about 40% of the leakage can be inexpensively controlled: about a penny per thousand cubic feet of gas, says the group’s chief scientist, Steve Hamburg. Federal rules requiring “green completion” of fracked wells will go into effect next year, a step Howarth applauds — though he and others note that enforcement will be largely left to state officials,... Still, with “unprecedented investment in natural gas infrastructure and regulatory oversight,” says Howarth, you might be able to cut leakage in half...“might result in a very modest reduction in total greenhouse gas emissions.” -- the other big factor slowing growth in renewable energy: the sudden rise in cheap shale gas. Even as the price of solar panels has dropped, inexpensive fracked gas reduces the incentives to convert to sun and wind. And once you’ve built the pipelines and gas-fired power plants, the sunk investment makes it that much harder to switch: Suddenly you have a bunch of gas barons who will fight as hard as the coal barons Obama is now trying to subdue. -- The head of the United Nations’ environment program, Achem Steiner, said earlier this year that the development of shale gas would be “a liability” in fighting global warming if “it turns into a 20-to-30-year delay” for low- and zero-carbon models.
Obama_administration  climate  energy  renewables  fracking  infrastructure  investment  energy-markets 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The 21st Century Investor: Ceres Blueprint for Sustainable Investing — Ceres
Unprecedented risks to the global economy make this a challenging time for the 21st century investor—institutional asset owners and their investment managers—most of which have multi-generational obligations to beneficiaries. Climate change, resource scarcity, population growth, energy demand, ensuring the human rights of workers across global supply chains, and access to fresh water are some of the major issues challenging our ability to build a sustainable economy, one that meets the needs of people today without compromising the needs of future generations. -- This Blueprint is written for the 21st Century investor— institutional asset owners and their investment managers—who need to understand and manage the growing risks posed by climate change, resource scarcity, population growth, human and labor rights, energy demand and access to water—risks that will challenge businesses and affect investment returns in the years and decades to come. -- section of Ceres website devoted to investor related initiatives - proxy voting guides, etc - and corporate and public finance isuues, such as sustainability risk disclosure, listing srandards, Climate Bonds Principles -- downloaded pdf of executive summary of report
report  climate  energy  water  ocean  demography  supply_chains  global_economy  global_governance  sustainability  financial_system  capital_markets  institutional_investors  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  public_finance  investors  disclosure  asset_management  political_economy  international_political_economy  Labor_markets  human_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
WEF's Global Risk Report | Silvia Merler at Bruegel.org - September 2014
Last week, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published its Global Risk Report (GRR) for 2014/15. The report is an exercise conducted by the WEF since 2006, but this year’s issue is particularly interesting because it adopts an historical perspective, offering insights on how the world has changed in respondents’ eyes and concerns. The GRR assesses risks that are global in nature and have the potential to cause significant negative impact across entire countries and industries if they take place over a time frame of up to 10 years. 31 such risks are identified in the report and grouped under five categories – economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological. *-* Economic Risks include fiscal and liquidity crises, failure of a major financial mechanism or institution, oil-price shocks, chronic unemployment and failure of physical infrastructure on which economic activity depends. *-* Environmental Risks encompass both natural disasters and man-made risks such as collapsing ecosystems, freshwater shortages, nuclear accidents and failure to mitigate or adapt to climate change. *-* Geopolitical Risks cover politics, diplomacy, conflict, crime and global governance. These risks range from terrorism, disputes over resources and war to governance being undermined by corruption, organized crime and illicit trade. *-* Societal Risks are intended to capture risks related to social stability – such as severe income disparities, food crises and dysfunctional cities – and public health, such as pandemics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the rising burden of chronic disease. *-* Technological Risks covers major risks related to the centrality of information and communication technologies to individuals, businesses and governments (such as cyber attacks, infrastructure disruptions and data loss). -- excellent network chart showing how risks are interrelated within and across categories -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  global_economy  global_governance  global_system  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_crisis  climate  energy  water  inequality  unemployment  geopolitics  infrastructure  public_health  public_goods  urban_development  urbanization  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
EU to DO 2015-2019: Memos to the new EU leadership | André Sapir, Guntram B. Wolff, Zsolt Darvas, Silvia Merler, Nicolas Véron, Mario Mariniello, Carlo Altomonte, Reinhilde Veugelers, Rainer Münz, Suparna Karmakar, Georg Zachmann and Jim O‘Neill at B
‘THERE IS NOW A DISTINCT POSSIBILITY that this crisis will be remembered as the occasion when Europe irretrievably lost ground, both economically and politically’. This was the starting sentence of our memos to the new EU leadership five years ago. Five years later, it is fair to say that this possibility has become a reality. Unemployment has reached record levels and growth has disappointed. Meanwhile, the world outside the EU has continued to change rapidly. Emerging markets in particular have increased their weight in the global economy and in decision making. The new EU leadership – the president of the European Commission and his team of commissioners, and the presidents of the European Council and of the European Parliament – will have to address pressing challenges. Despite the significant steps taken by Europe – among them the creation of a European Stability Mechanism, the start of a banking union, the strengthening of fiscal rules and substantial structural reforms in crisis countries – results for citizens are still unsatisfactory. It is impossible to summarise all the memos in this volume but a common theme is the need to focus on pro-growth policies, on a deepening of the single market, on better and more global trade integration. Reverting to national protectionism, more state aid for national or European champions – as frequently argued for by national politicians – will not be the right way out of the crisis. On the contrary, more Europe and deeper economic integration in some crucial areas, such as energy, capital markets and the digital economy, would greatly support the feeble recovery. But in other areas, less Europe would also be a highly welcome signal that the new European leadership is serious about subsidiarity. Internal re-organisation of the European Commission to ensure that it better delivers would also be welcome. -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  EU  Eurozone  Great_Recession  economic_growth  unemployment  capital_markets  energy  financial_regulation  banking  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
SSRN Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), Fourth Biennial Global Conference
The Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) was held in Bern and hosted by the World Trade Institute (WTI) of the University of Bern, from 10-12 July 2014. You can browse all SIEL Fourth Biennial Global Conference abstracts in the SSRN eLibrary. The Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) is a new organization aimed at academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials in the field of IEL, in all parts of the world. The broad goals and objectives of the organization include: building links and networks between and among IEL academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials; fostering the development of local IEL expertise and IEL organizations where needed; representing the discipline of international economic law as appropriate in global, regional and national fora; and encouraging research, practice, service and teaching in the field of IEL.
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_organizations  development  trade-policy  trade-agreements  WTO  global_governance  international_political_economy  reform-legal  institutional_economics  international_finance  capital_markets  capital_flows  climate  energy  ocean  treaties 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Ansar, Flyvbjerg, Budzier, Lunn - Should We Build More Large Dams? The Actual Costs of Hydropower Megaproject Development (Energy Policy, March 2014, pp.1-14.) :: SSRN
Atif Ansar - University of Oxford - Blavatnik School of Government -- Bent Flyvbjerg - University of Oxford - Said Business School -- Alexander Budzier - University of Oxford - Saïd Business School.-- Daniel Lunn - University of Oxford - Department of Statistics *--* A brisk building boom of hydropower mega-dams is underway from China to Brazil. Whether benefits of new dams will outweigh costs remains unresolved despite contentious debates. We investigate this question with the “outside view” or “reference class forecasting” based on literature on decision-making under uncertainty in psychology. We find overwhelming evidence that budgets are systematically biased below actual costs of large hydropower dams — excluding inflation, substantial debt servicing, environmental, and social costs. Using the largest and most reliable reference data of its kind and multilevel statistical techniques applied to large dams for the first time, we were successful in fitting parsimonious models to predict cost and schedule overruns. The outside view suggests that in most countries large hydropower dams will be too costly in absolute terms and take too long to build to deliver a positive risk-adjusted return unless suitable risk management measures outlined in this paper can be affordably provided. Policymakers, particularly in developing countries, are advised to prefer agile energy alternatives that can be built over shorter time horizons to energy megaprojects. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 14 - Keywords: Large hydropower dams, Schedule & cost estimates, Cost benefit forecasting, Reference class forecasting, Outside -- didn't download
article  SSRN  development  energy  IFIs  business-and-politics  statistics  social_sciences  methodology-quantitative  decision_theory  international_finance  institutional_economics  business-forecasts 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Bing Yan - China’s Actions to cut Carbon Emissions | Lindau Blog August 2014
China’s next 5 year plan is very ambitious re reducing carbon intensity of production and urban pollution and energy consumption - blog post fairly upbeat re China being able to use technologies and new methods for planning and monitoring policy outcomes, and what the Chinese are able to accomplish will make all the difference between manageable and catastrophic globally -- What makes a methodology stand out is its orientation towards actions. After all, having a transparent, accurate carbon counting method is only the first step toward any climate change solution. For example, a methodology that I would recommend for China is called Bilan Carbone, developed by the French inter-ministerial department Agence De l’Environnement et de la Maitrise de l’Energie (Environment and Energy Management Agency). It has an integrated process for setting reduction targets, through which reduction actions can be directly derived from emission calculations. Best practices for implementation from various cities and regions are available online and learning can be easily shared among city governors. On the practical side, there is an additional tool called Territorial Climate and Energy Plan, which can link Carbon Balance with policy enforcement
China  environment  climate  energy  urban_politics  industrialization 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Martin Wolf - climate fix would ruin investors | June 2014
Exon-Mobil is betting all the new stuff it's exploring for is coming out of the ground as well as existing reserves - well on the way to plus 3°C - and Wolf is betting Exon-Mobil is right.
climate  energy  capitalism  investment 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Radek Stefanski - Inferred fossil-fuel subsidies: A new database | vox , 30 May 2014
Dirty little secrets: Inferring fossil-fuel subsidies from patterns in emission intensities -- No comprehensive database of directly measured fossil-fuel subsidies exists at the international or the sub-national level, yet subsidies may be crucial drivers of global carbon emissions. This column describes a novel method for inferring carbon subsidies by examining country-specific patterns in carbon emission-to-output ratios, known as emission intensities. Calculations for 155 nations from 1980-2005 reveal that fossil-fuel price distortions are enormous, increasing, and often hidden. These subsidies contributed importantly to increasing emissions and lower growth.-- Finally, subsidy-like wedges are expensive. Besides massively increasing carbon emissions, the total cost of fossil-fuel wedges amounted to a staggering 3.8% of global GDP in 2010 alone. To put this into the starkest possible perspective, the 2014 IPCC report estimates that climate change will lower global GDP by at most 2% per year in 50 years. By this measure, subsidy-like wedges on fossil fuels are nearly twice as damaging as climate change itself. Worryingly, these wedges are increasing over time. Whilst not all distortions can be eliminated, removing even some of these can help strained government budgets, make a significant (and cheap) contribution to the fight against climate change, and result in higher levels of global GDP.
economic_growth  climate  energy  industrialization  subsidies  government_finance  incentives 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Jones - Fraud, Failure, and Frustration: This Is the Story of America's First Energy Transition | The Atlantic April 2014
In addition to learning the techniques to ignite anthracite, consumers also needed to invest in specialized technology. Because air needs to flow through pieces of anthracite and there must be space for the ash to fall away, homeowners could not rely on the open-hearth fireplaces they used for wood. Instead, they had to purchase specialized stoves or grates—an expensive upfront investment that discouraged many from experimenting with anthracite. In order to lower these barriers to entry, anthracite promoters worked with local manufacturers to increase their production of stoves and lower the costs. They helped stimulate a remarkable boom in stove design: from 1815 to 1839, the Patent Office issued 329 awards to stove manufacturers, nearly four percent of all patents awarded in this period. By 1831, consumers could buy stoves for as little as five dollars, bringing the material requirement for burning anthracite within reach of most working-class families.
US_history  economic_culture  energy  consumers  intellectual_property  climate 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Raffi Khatchadourian: Can an Audacious Plan to Create a New Energy Resource Help Save the Planet? : The New Yorker
Superb science and politics writing -- Years from now—maybe in a decade, maybe sooner—if all goes according to plan, the most complex machine ever built will be switched on in an Alpine forest in the South of France. The machine, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, or ITER, will stand a hundred feet tall, and it will weigh twenty-three thousand tons—more than twice the weight of the Eiffel Tower. At its core, densely packed high-precision equipment will encase a cavernous vacuum chamber, in which a super-hot cloud of heavy hydrogen will rotate faster than the speed of sound, twisting like a strand of DNA as it circulates. The cloud will be scorched by electric current (a surge so forceful that it will make lightning seem like a tiny arc of static electricity), and bombarded by concentrated waves of radiation. Beams of uncharged particles—the energy in them so great it could vaporize a car in seconds—will pour into the chamber, adding heat. In this way, the circulating hydrogen will become ionized, and achieve temperatures exceeding two hundred million degrees Celsius—more than ten times as hot as the sun at its blazing core.
physics  energy  global_governance  international_organizations  climate  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Carbon Capture And Storage: One Step Forward, One Step Back | ThinkProgress
A new survey finds a sharp drop in large-scale integrated projects to capture CO2 from energy systems and bury it underground. This drop from 75 projects to 65 over the past year is yet more evidence that we shouldn’t expect large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) before the 2030s at the earliest, nor expect that CCS would provide more than 10% of the answer to the carbon problem by 2050. The 200-page Global CCS Institute study, “The Global Status of CCS, 2013,” doesn’t offer much to be optimistic about.
climate  energy  technology 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
New Arizona Solar Plant Uses Salt To Keep Producing Electricity When The Sun Goes Down | ThinkProgress
The three-square-mile commercial-scale facility near Gila Bend, Arizona will use thermal energy storage, in the form of a molten salt system, to continue producing clean energy without sunlight. “This technology enables Solana to produce electricity at full capacity for up to six hours after sunset, including the early evening hours when customer demand for power typically peaks in Arizona,” according to an Arizona Public Service (APS) press release.

This is a big step forward from the more common solar photovoltaic (PV) technology, which requires direct sunlight to create electricity.
climate  energy  technology 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael Slezak: Fall of USSR locked up world's largest store of carbon - environment - 02 October 2013 - New Scientist
The fall of the Soviet Union created the largest ever human-made carbon sink – abandoned farmland.

In 1991, the USSR formally split into separate republics. The subsequent collapse of industry reduced the amount of greenhouse gas emissions Russia produced – helping it to easily meet the climate targets set by the Kyoto protocol.

But as well as cutting emissions, the fall had another effect. The privatisation of land led to one of the biggest land-use changes of the 20th century. Huge tracts of farmland were abandoned when the collectivised farming system introduced by Stalin collapsed, and farmers simply left the land and headed for the cities.

Ever since, plants have been reclaiming the land and locking in carbon as they grow.
20thC  21stC  Russia  Russian_economy  agriculture  post-Cold_War  transition_economies  climate  energy 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
James Hamilton - Econbrowser: The peak in world oil production is yet to come - Sept 2013
. U.S. production grew by 1.3 mb/d and Canada by 770,000 b/d. Between them, these two countries could account for more than 100% of the 2.0 mb/d increase in world crude oil production since 2005, Production from all of the other countries in the world combined actually fell a little between 2005 and 2012. Significant gains in places like Iraq, Russia, and Angola were more than offset by declines in the North Sea, Mexico, and Iran..... , without oil sands and tight oil, crude oil production in the United States and Canada, and for that matter the world as a whole, would have been lower in 2012 than it was in 2005.

The EIA anticipates that U.S. tight oil production can continue to increase another 800,000 b/d above 2012 levels before peaking in 2020. ?....Those who thought that world oil production would peak in 2005 have been proven to be wrong. But so, too, were those who thought the run-up in oil prices of the last decade would be a temporary disruption until we found a way to return to the world as it had been for a century up until that point.
global_economy  US_economy  energy  statistics  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Intro to Cook Piece | Fixing the Economists January 2012
Phil Pilkington overview of piece on distortions in the oil markets due to commodities like oil becoming financial inflation hedge and the opaque links between Big Oil and Big Finance
international_political_economy  international_finance  energy 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
All the shale boom are belong to US | FT Alphaville 6-27-13
Report that's pessimistic re other parts of world getting in on shale boom
Response that the report is too pessimistic. The real bottleneck isn't drilling rigs or micro organization of sector in US that other countries will have difficulty emulating. It's lack of experienced engineers, geologists and operators, but with China graduating 100s of 1000s of engineers and the scale of opportunities, the ROW will get over this bottleneck within a decade.
US_economy  international_political_economy  China  energy  climate 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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