dunnettreader + emotions   53

Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Embodied Cognition (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
1. Embodied vs Traditional Cognitive Science
2. Some Historical Anchors for Embodied Cognitive Science
2.1 Metaphor and Cognition
2.2 Enactive Cognition.
2.3 Rethinking Robotics.
2.4 Ecological Perception.
2.5 Dynamicism and Development
2.6 Phenomenology
3. What Embodied Cognition Is
4. Embodiment vs Tradition on Three Issues
4.1 Modularity
4.2 Mental Representation.
4.3 Nativism
5. Empirical Domains for Embodied Cognition
5.1 Visual Consciousness
5.2 Concepts
5.3 Memory.
5.4 Other Minds.
5.5 Moral Cognition.
6. Sharper Divides Over Embodied Cognition
6.1 Payoffs for empirical research.
6.2 Accommodation by traditional cognitive science
6.3 Embodied cognition and the extended mind thesis.
6.4 Agency, the self, and subjectivity.
bibliography  philosophy_of_mind  mind-body  mind  embodied_cognition  neuroscience  phenomenology  innatism  innate_ideas  theory_of_mind  perception  memory  cognition  emotions  representation-metaphysics  child_development  language  moral_psychology 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - [draft slides] Athletes in the Arena: Diderot and his Seneca | Academia.edu
Whereas Seneca's critics argue that his life and alleged compliance with Nero contradicts his Stoic, noble-sounding principles, discrediting the latter; in his two late books on the Stoic, Diderot argues that Seneca's continual attempts to mollify Nero's tyranny betters the philosophy.  Where Diderot's critics reduce the two works on Seneca to veiled attacks on Rousseau, Diderot is critical of those texts wherein Seneca advocated the withdrawal & “leisure of the sage” or the vita contemplativa, while Rome burnt (“Rousseau est la figure moderne et honnie du détachement, qui permet à Diderot de dissocier Sénèque du détachement stoïcien. » (Lojskine 2009))  Whether contra Rousseau or no, Diderot is most attracted—amongst all Seneca's works Diderot examines—to Seneca’s On Benefits, and wants to restore compassion, even justified anger, to Stoicism.  Whether to justify himself for his own naivety in trying to teach Catherine of Russia or not, Diderot defends Seneca’s attempts to mollify Nero, led by De Clementia; he appeals, a la Shaftesbury and others, to Seneca’s “coeur” and compassion, beyond his Stoicism, notably in On Benefits; he criticises Stoic fatalism and appeals to a paraStoic notion of “natural rights” to justify resistance to tyranny; famously celebrating the American revolution as as lesson to all Europe.  So, beneath the "miserable" polemics (Cittion), there remains a good deal of philosophy; beneath the rhetorical smoke, (to use a Stoic-ism) a good deal of theoretical fire.  This paper aims at retrieving this fire, and situating Diderot's mitigated Stoicism as a French avatar of the moral sentimentalist position, with roots in the Stoic idea of oikeosis (and of parental love as the elementary cell of sociablity), as articulated by CIcero. Research Interests: Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, and Philosophy as a way of life -- downloaded
paper  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  18thC  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Stoicism  Seneca  Diderot  Rousseau  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  eclecticism  Cicero  emotions  tyranny  Roman_Empire  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Leo Damrosh - The Enlightenment: Invention of the Modern Self | The Great Courses
Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self - from opening views in 17thC, through stages of the Enlightenment - a road to its (inevitable?) backlash in Romanticism
24 lectures
Only available as Audio download (and streaming) - list price $130
Rave reviews
Uses literary works and philosophical texts together
Frex completes the 2 lectures on British empiricism (focus on Locke and Hume re the self) with how Pope struggles with capturing complex psychology within the empiricist framework
After an introduction of 17thC religious and secular conceptions of the self, starts with 2 on La Princesse de Clèves
After empiricism, 2 on Voltaire and theodicy in Candide
3 lectures on Diderot and Jacques le fataliste
A lot of Rousseau - not the novels but the autobiographical works - how he analyzes himself in Confessions and Solitary Walker
Lots of biography, with Boswell's Johnson the vehicle
Some Franklin and Smith
Finishes with Laclos and Blake
Romanticism  bibliography  reason-passions  poetry  Boswell  self  moral_psychology  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_Revolution-impact  Rousseau  free_will  Locke-education  buy  human_nature  Diderot  Blake_William  Locke  Hume-causation  autobiography  17thC  Rousseau-self  Hume-ethics  altruism  Johnson  Voltaire  novels  empiricism  18thC  moral_philosophy  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Pope_Alexander  courses  French_lit  Smith  Hume  determinism  epistemology  emotions  character  audio  psychology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life (2015) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: Sophia (in press) -- This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Shaftesbury, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  Epictetus  philosophy-as-way-of-life  Marcus_Aurelius  Hadot_Pierre  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  psychology  passions  emotions  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Newberry - Joseph Butler on Forgiveness: A Presupposed Theory of Emotion | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2001)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Apr., 2001), pp. 233-244 -- corrects misreading of Butler's position - not overcoming emotions of resentment but restraining one's actions or forbearance of taking revenge -- and discusses why Butler has been misread -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  Butler  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  theology  forgiveness  moral_sentiments  morality-Christian  emotions  reason-passions  action-theory  agency  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
David Dwan - Edmund Burke and the Emotions | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 571-593 -- very extensive bibliography -- Scholarship on Burke, his aesthetics, 18thC aesthetics more generally, Enlightenment Reason, moral sentiment, sentimental lit, etc -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  18thC  Burke  reason  emotions  sublime  aesthetics  sentimentalism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  moral_sentiments  judgment-political  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-emotions  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Wollstonecraft  civil_society  bibliography 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Dale Jacquette, review - Ted Honderich, Actual Consciousness (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - August 2015
Ted Honderich’s new book takes the exploration of the mysteries of consciousness in an interesting direction. He develops a certain-to-be-controversial…
subjectivity  books  emotions  consciousness  cognition  analytical_philosophy  self  reviews  mind  qualia  perception  phenomenology  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Hadot, Pierre | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. Biography **--** 2. Philology and Method **--** 3. Early Work: Plotinus and the Simplicity of Vision **--** 4. What is Ancient Philosophy? -- (a) Philosophical Discourse versus Philosophy -- (b) Philosophy as a Way of Life -- (b) The Figure of Socrates -- (c) The Figure of the Sage **--** 5. Spiritual Practices -- (a) Askesis of Desire -- (b) Premeditation of Death and Evils -- (c) Concentration on the Present Moment -- (d) The View from Above -- (e) Writing as Hypomnemata, and The Inner Citadel **--** 6. The Transformation of Philosophy after the Decline of Antiquity -- (a) The Adoption of Spiritual Practices in Monasticism -- (b) Philosophical Discourse as Handmaiden to Theology and the Natural Sciences -- (c) The Permanence of the Ancient Conception of Philosophy **--** 7. References and Further Reading -- (a) Works in French. -- (b) Works in English. -- (c) Selected Articles on Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Socrates  eudaimonia  Stoicism  Epicurean  spiritual_practices  self-knowledge  self-sufficiency  self-development  self  self-control  passions  emotions  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  desire  judgment-emotions  meditation  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  transcendence  late_antiquity  monasticism  theology  philosophy_of_religion  natural_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Hadot_Pierre  French_intellectuals  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  Hellenism  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Roundtable - Romanticism, Enlightenment, and Counter-Enlightenment | Philoctetes Center - April 17, 2010
, 2:30 PM
Romanticism, Enlightenment, and Counter-Enlightenment

Participants: Akeel Bilgrami, Taylor Carman, Garrett Deckel, Colin Jager, Joel Whitebook Isaiah Berlin introduced the work of a range of philosophers in the German romantic and German idealist tradition to the English-speaking world. His fascination with some of their ideas was accompanied by a concomitant anxiety about them. The anxiety issued from his staunch liberal commitment to the orthodox Enlightenment. Yet, the fascination was an implicit acknowledgement on his part of some of the limitations of the Enlightenment's liberal ideas. This roundtable will look at this underlying tension in Berlin, which many liberals feel to this day. Panelists will probe the role of reason, perception, and emotion in our individual and political psychology, and ask the question of whether or not there is something for liberalism to learn from what Berlin—rightly or wrongly—called the "Counter-Enlightenment." -- see YouTube bookmark for direct link -- video also embedded in program page
video  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  German_Idealism  liberalism  Berlin_Isaiah  reason  rationality  perception  emotions  reason-passions  political_philosophy  political_culture  social_psychology  moral_psychology  nature  nature-mastery  cognition  prejudice  cognitive_bias  mind  mind-body  philosophical_anthropology 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
IEEE Xplore Abstract Franklin, S.; Madl, T. ; D'mello, S. ; Snaider, J. - LIDA: A Systems-level Architecture for Cognition, Emotion, and Learning (2014)
IEEE Transactions on Autonomous Mental Development, (Volume:6 , Issue: 1 ) Page(s):19 - 41 DOI:10.1109/TAMD.2013.2277589 -- We describe a cognitive architecture learning intelligent distribution agent (LIDA) that affords attention, action selection and human-like learning intended for use in controlling cognitive agents that replicate human experiments as well as performing real-world tasks. LIDA combines sophisticated action selection, motivation via emotions, a centrally important attention mechanism, and multimodal instructionalist and selectionist learning. Empirically grounded in cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience, the LIDA architecture employs a variety of modules and processes, each with its own effective representations and algorithms. LIDA has much to say about motivation, emotion, attention, and autonomous learning in cognitive agents. In this paper, we summarize the LIDA model together with its resulting agent architecture, describe its computational implementation, and discuss results of simulations that replicate known experimental data. We also discuss some of LIDA's conceptual modules, propose nonlinear dynamics as a bridge between LIDA's modules and processes and the underlying neuroscience, and point out some of the differences between LIDA and other cognitive architectures. Finally, we discuss how LIDA addresses some of the open issues in cognitive architecture research. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  neuroscience  psychology  brain  consciousness  cognition  emotions  learning  memory  attention  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Gaëlle Desbordes et al - Effects of mindful-attention and compassion meditation training on amygdala response to emotional stimuli in an ordinary, non-meditative state (2012) | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Original Research ARTICLE - Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, 01 November 2012 | doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2012.00292 -- Gaëlle Desbordes1,2*, Lobsang T. Negi3, Thaddeus W. W. Pace4, B. Alan Wallace5, Charles L. Raison6 and Eric L. Schwartz2,7 - authors in brain research, imaging, computational engineering, psychiatry, and religious studies from Mass General, Boston U, Emory, U of Arizona -- In this study, we investigated how 8 weeks of training in meditation affects amygdala responses to emotional stimuli in subjects when in a non-meditative state. Healthy adults with no prior meditation experience took part in 8 weeks of either Mindful Attention Training (MAT), Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT; a program based on Tibetan Buddhist compassion meditation practices), or an active control intervention. Before and after the intervention, participants underwent an fMRI experiment during which they were presented images with positive, negative, and neutral emotional valences from the IAPS database while remaining in an ordinary, non-meditative state. Using a region-of-interest analysis, we found a longitudinal decrease in right amygdala activation in the Mindful Attention group in response to positive images, and in response to images of all valences overall. In the CBCT group, we found a trend increase in right amygdala response to negative images, which was significantly correlated with a decrease in depression score. No effects or trends were observed in the control group. This finding suggests that the effects of meditation training on emotional processing might transfer to non-meditative states. This is consistent with the hypothesis that meditation training may induce learning that is not stimulus- or task-specific, but process-specific, and thereby may result in enduring changes in mental function. -- didn't download
article  neuroscience  emotions  attention  meditation  Buddhism 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Kieran Fox et al - Is thinking really aversive? Commentary on Wilson et al.’s “Just think: The challenges of the disengaged mind” | Frontiers of Psychology - Cognition
Shoots down silly but highly publicized claim that people would rather undergo electric shocks than sit by themselves and "just think" for 15 minutes. They go through the experiment setups and data sets and show that the experiments demonstrated nothing like the dramatic claims but rather were consistent with prior research. Opinion ARTICLE -- Frontiers of Psychology | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01427 -- Kieran C. Fox1, Evan Thompson2, Jessica R. Andrews-Hanna4 and Kalina Christoff1, 3* -- Spontaneous thought, often colloquially referred to as ‘daydreaming’ or ‘mind-wandering,’ is increasingly being investigated by scientists (for recent reviews, see Andrews-Hanna et al., 2014; Christoff, 2012; Smallwood and Schooler, 2014). In a recent article published in Science, Wilson et al. (2014) argue in support of the view (e.g., Killingsworth & Gilbert, 2010) that such thinking is predominantly unpleasant, and even emotionally aversive. While we were impressed with the enormous wealth of data collected by Wilson et al. and by the number of experimental manipulations carried out, we found their interpretations surprising in light of prior research. We applaud Wilson et al.’s detailed effort to investigate the content and affective qualities of ‘just thinking’ – but upon examining their dataset, we find little support for their claims. -- didn't download
article  neuroscience  psychology  behavior  mind  bad_journalism  science-public  bad_science  emotions 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674 (2004) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2006), p. 1247
Derek Hirst, Washington University in St. Louis -- Reviewed work(s): Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. xii, 370. $49.50. -- mixed review. -- he thinks she's on to a major way of looking how various metaphors were deployed and evolved in 17, with her readings of Hobbes and Milton 1st rate. She gets some facts and cites wrong when she strays out of her lane (cavalier not in the 17thC sense). But more damning is her lack of sufficient familiarity with Elizabethan and French discourses of romance, passions and bodies politic. Short -- didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  literary_history  17thC  Hobbes  Milton  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  republicanism  social_contract  emotions  passions  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  reciprocity  trust  interest-discourse 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Bartley, review - Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 16, 2014
Reviewed by Christopher Bartley, University of Liverpool -- This is a fine collection of learned essays replete with translations from primary sources, but a sense of frustration may be induced in the reader attracted by the book's title. Most of the contributors admit that the topics of free will, agency and selfhood as understood in the West today don't really have equivalents in the Indian traditions of thought and practice under consideration.
books  reviews  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Hinduism  Buddhism  Sanskrit  free_will  self  ontology  metaphysics  reincarnation  metempsychosis  emotions  desire  agency 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Timothy Chappell - John Cottingham, Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 560-562
Cottingham doesn't think much of current moral_philosophy that treats "beliefs" and "desires" as transparent entities that can be manipulated in theory -- they have abandoned not only Freudian insights but even the purported ultra rationalist Descartes who was clued in to the physiology of emotions, and that reason is embodied -- Chappell highly recommends -- didn't download
books  find  reviews  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  psychoanalysis  mind-body  passions  reason-passions  emotions  Aristotle  Descartes 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Elements of Criticism, 2 vols. [1762], ed. Peter Jones - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Elements of Criticism, Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Jones (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 2 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1860> -- A two volume work on the “science of criticism” by one of the leading figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. Kames argues that criticism of art and literature is a rational science as well as a matter of taste. In volume 1 he explores the nature and causes of the emotions and passions. In volume 2 he explores the principles of rhetoric and literary appreciation, and discusses the formation of our standards of taste.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  aesthetics  lit_crit  literary_history  art_history  art_criticism  human_nature  emotions  passions  psychology  moral_psychology  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  taste  high_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Chris D. Frith and Tania Singer - The Role of Social Cognition in Decision Making | JSTOR: Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences, Vol. 363, No. 1511 (Dec. 12, 2008), pp. 3875-3886
Successful decision making in a social setting depends on our ability to understand the intentions, emotions and beliefs of others. The mirror system allows us to understand other people's motor actions and action intentions. 'Empathy' allows us to understand and share emotions and sensations with others. 'Theory of mind' allows us to understand more abstract concepts such as beliefs or wishes in others. In all these cases, evidence has accumulated that we use the specific neural networks engaged in processing mental states in ourselves to understand the same mental states in others. However, the magnitude of the brain activity in these shared networks is modulated by contextual appraisal of the situation or the other person. An important feature of decision making in a social setting concerns the interaction of reason and emotion. We consider four domains where such interactions occur: our sense of fairness, altruistic punishment, trust and framing effects. In these cases, social motivations and emotions compete with each other, while higher-level control processes modulate the interactions of these low-level biases. -- didn't download -- large references list
article  jstor  social_theory  cognition-social  decision_theory  altruism  fairness  trust  framing_effects  emotions  neuroscience  mind-theory_of  empathy  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense, ed. Aaron Garrett - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense, ed. Aaron Garrett (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/885> The first half of the work presents a rich moral psychology built on a theory of the passions and an account of motivation deepening and augmenting the doctrine of moral sense developed in the Inquiry. The second half of the work, the Illustrations, is a brilliant attack on rationalist moral theories and is the font of many of the arguments taken up by Hume and used to this day.
books  etexts  18thC  moral_philosophy  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  passions  emotions  Hume-ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ruth Leyes - “Both of Us Disgusted in My Insula”: Mirror Neuron Theory and Emotional Empathy | nonsite.org March 2012
Attacks mirror neuron experiments and conclusions - ... the presuppositions of Wicker and his team can be traced most directly to the work of the American psychologist Silvan S. Tomkins, and especially to that of his follower, Paul Ekman, both of whom have proposed an evolutionary-classificatory approach to the affects. Key features of their approach include the claim that there exists a small number of basic emotions, such as disgust, which can be defined in evolutionary terms as universal or pancultural, adaptive responses of the organism; that these emotions are discrete, innate, reflex-like “affect programs” located in subcortical parts of the brain; that the basic emotions manifest themselves in distinct patterns of physiological arousal and especially in characteristic facial expressions; that according to Ekman’s “neurocultural” model for explaining commonalities and variations in human facial displays, socialization and learning may determine the range of stimuli that can “trigger” the emotions and... “display rules,” ...and that the more complex or “higher” emotions are made up of blends of the basic emotions. A further claim associated with the Basic Emotions View, ..., is that although the emotions can and do combine with the cognitive systems in the brain, they are essentially separate processes. For Freud and the “appraisal theorists” such as Richard Lazarus, Robert Solomon, Martha Nussbaum, Phoebe Ellsworth and others, emotions are embodied intentional states that are directed toward objects and depend on our beliefs and desires. But the Basic Emotion View denies this by interpreting the affects as non-intentional responses. It thus posits a constitutive disjunction between our emotions on the one hand and our knowledge of what causes and maintains them on the other, because feeling and cognition are two separate systems.
article  neuroscience  cognition  evolutionary_biology  cognition-social  epistemology-social  empathy  emotions  Smith  Nussbaum  bibliography  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by Peter J. Steinberger - Leslie Paul Thiele, The Heart of Judgment: Practical Wisdom, Neuroscience, and Narrative | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 2007), pp. 359-360
Ever since Aristotle, phronesis has been impossible to pin down. Steinberger - inevitable that someone would try to use new neuroscience, and if a book like this had to be written, at least Thiele makes a reasonably thoughtful stab at it. Given that faint praise, review sorts through how Thiele uses scientific evidence and speculation to date. He finds it reductionist and the production of the illusion of self via a MacIntyre type story hand wavy. -- didn't download
books  article  jstor  mind  neuroscience  moral_philosophy  emotions  reason-passions  phronesis  practical_reason  practical_knowledge  narrative  self  identity  consciousness  reflection  deliberation  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Christina Tarnopolsky - Platonic Reflections on the Aesthetic Dimensions of Deliberative Democracy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 35, No. 3 (Jun., 2007), pp. 288-312
This essay utilizes Plato's insights into the role of shame in dialogical interactions to illuminate the aesthetic dimensions of deliberative democracy. Through a close analysis of the refutation of Polus in Plato's dialogue, the "Gorgias", I show how the emotion of shame is central to the unsettling, dynamic, and transformative character of democratic engagement and political judgment identified by recent aesthetic critics of Habermas' model of communicative action and democratic deliberation. Plato's analysis of shame offers a friendly amendment to these aesthetic critiques by showing how the psychological forces at the heart of shame make the outcome of our political engagements with others uncertain and unsettling, even while they make possible the kind of self-reflexivity necessary to foster the deliberative virtue of sincerity or truthfulness. -- interesting bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_culture  deliberation-public  democracy  Habermas  Plato  Socrates  truthfulness  emotions  shame  judgment-emotions  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Hassan Melehy - Silencing the Animals: Montaigne, Descartes, and the Hyperbole of Reason | JSTOR: symplokē, Vol. 13, No. 1/2 (2005), pp. 263-282
Toulmin on Cartesian hyper rationality and Derrida on man animal, Montaigne and Descartes -- useful postmodern bibliography as well as articles in last few decades on whether Descartes was a friend or enemy of animals based on where he drew the boundary.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  modernity  rationality  scepticism  anti-foundationalism  Montaigne  Descartes  animals  humanism  reason  emotions  perception  sensibility  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Chabot - Thomas Hobbes: Skeptical Moralist | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 89, No. 2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 401-410
Thomas Hobbes is usually held to have been a skeptic in matters of religion and morality. I accept the claim that there is a distinctive skeptical strain in Hobbes' thought but argue that his skepticism informs his moral vision, rather than depriving him of a conception of morality. As evidence for this reading, I situate Hobbes in a tradition of "skeptical moralism," along with Montaigne and certain other Renaissance figures. As opposed to moral skeptics, skeptical moralists think of moral agents as divided selves, pulled in one direction by law and another by conscience. Skeptical moralists use skepticism to make people aware of this tension, and I argue that (especially in his remarks on religion) Hobbes was doing just that. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  religious_belief  scepticism  moral_psychology  emotions  virtue  Montaigne  French_moralists  libertine_erudite  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin - Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and Its Therapies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 131-154
During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. René Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim and, on that basis, he offered practical medical advice to others and advertised the expectation that, taking his own advice, he would live a very long time. This paper describes what Cartesian medicine looked like in practice and what that practice owed to the power of modernist Reason. -- huge bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  17thC  Descartes  Bacon  natural_philosophy  physiology  psychology  emotions  mind-body  diet  aging  humours  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jörg Spieker - Foucault and Hobbes on Politics, Security, and War | JSTOR: Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, Vol. 36, No. 3 (August 2011), pp. 187-199
This article engages and seeks to develop Michel Foucault’s account of the nexus between modern politics, security, and war. Focusing on his 1976 lecture series Society Must Be Defended, the article considers Foucault’s tentative hypothesis about how the logic of war becomes inscribed into modern politics through the principle of security. Contra Foucault, it is suggested that this nexus can already be found in the proto-liberal political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. In order to make this argument, the article focuses on the ontological dimension of Hobbes' thought. It suggests that the relationship between the state of war and political order in Hobbes is more complex and more ambiguous than Foucault thought. Rather than being transcended, the Hobbesian state of war is appropriated by the state, and converted into the fundamental antagonism between reason and passion. The latter gives rise to a regime of security through which a relationship of war is inscribed into the Hobbesian commonwealth. Jörg Spieker - Department of War Studies, King’s College London, London, UK - doi: 10.1177/0304375411418596 Alternatives: Global, Local, Political August 2011 vol. 36 no. 3 187-199 -- on Sage -- sounds Weberian
article  jstor  paywall  IR  political_philosophy  17thC  20thC  Hobbes  Foucault  war  security  fear  nation-state  political_order  reason  emotions  human_nature  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Henrich - A cultural species: How culture drove human evolution | Science Brief - Am Psychological Assoc Nov 2011
Recognizing the centrality of culture in human life leads to a novel evolutionary theory of status and status psychology. Evolutionary researchers have tended to assume that human status is merely an extension of primate dominance hierarchies. However, because humans are so heavily dependent on an information economy for survival, our species has evolved a second avenue to social status that operates alongside dominance and has its own suite of cognitive and affective processes. -- This work connects with the emotion literature where prior empirical studies had indicated the existence of two facets for the emotion pride—labeled authentic and hubristic pride. Our ongoing efforts suggest that hubristic pride is associated with dominance-status and authentic pride with prestige-status. -- Much empirical work treats status as a uni-dimensional construct, and then unknowingly operationalizes it as either prestige or dominance, or some mix of the two. -- The cultural evolution of norms over tens or hundreds of thousands of years, and their shaping by cultural group selection, may have driven genetic evolution to create a suite of cognitive adaptations we call norm psychology. -- This suite facilitates, among other things, our identification and learning of social norms, our expectation of sanctions for norm violations, and our ability to internalize normative behavior as motivations. This approach also predicts that humans ought to be inclined to “over-imitate” for two different evolutionary reasons, one informational and the other normative. The informational view hypothesizes that people over-imitate because of an evolved reliance on cultural learning to adaptively acquire complex and cognitively-opaque skills, techniques and practices that have been honed, often in nuanced and subtle ways, over generations. However, because individuals should also “over-imitate” because human societies have long been full of arbitrary norms (behaviors) for which the “correct” performance is crucial to one’s reputation (e.g., rituals, etiquette), we expect future investigations to reveal two different kinds of over-imitation. -- The selection pressures created by reputational damage and punishment for norm-violation may also favour norm-internalization. Neuroeconomic studies suggest that social norms are in fact internalized as intrinsic motivations in people’s brains.
biocultural_evolution  social_psychology  norms  status  power  leaders  learning  children  innate_ideas  incentives  behavioral_economics  moral_psychology  emotions  morality-conventional  sociology_of_religion  trust  cooperation  Innovation  tools  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Joe Henrich - Website | University of British Columbia
Research Program: Coevolution, Development, Cognition & Cultural Learning -- Published Papers and Book Chapters by Category

- Societal Complexity and Cultural Evolution
- Social Norms and Cooperation
- Social Status (Prestige and Dominance)
- Religion
- Methodological Contributions and Population Variations
- Overviews
- Cultural Learning (Models and Evidence)
- Ethnography (Fiji, Machiguenga, Mapuche)
- Chimpanzee Sociality
- General Interest
bibliography  research  paper  biocultural_evolution  culture  social_psychology  anthropology  behavioral_economics  sociology_of_religion  status  norms  morality-conventional  moral_psychology  emotions  networks  institutions  complexity  demography  children  learning  tools  cooperation  competition  Innovation 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Alan Fine : The Sad Demise, Mysterious Disappearance, and Glorious Triumph of Symbolic Interactionism | Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 19 (1993), pp. 61-87
Very useful intellectual history and status of sociology theory streams, research programs,cross boundary links, borrowings etc-- downloaded pdf to Note The Sad Demise, Mysterious Disappearance, and Glorious Triumph of Symbolic Interactionism Gary Alan Fine Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 19, (1993) (pp. 61-87) Page Count: 27 Symbolic interactionism has changed over the past two decades, both in the issues that practitioners examine and in its position within the discipline. Once considered adherents of a marginal oppositional perspective, confronting the dominant positivist, quantitative approach of mainstream sociology, symbolic interactionists find now that many of their core concepts have been accepted. Simultaneously their core as an intellectual community has been weakened by the diversity of interests of those who self-identify with the perspective. I examine here four processes that led to these changes: fragmentation, expansion, incorporation, and adoption. I then describe the role of symbolic interactionism in three major debates confronting the discipline: the micro/macro debate, the structure/agency debate, and the social realist/interpretivist debate. I discuss six empirical arenas in which interactionists have made major research contributions: social coordination theory, the sociology of emotions, social constructionism, self and identity theory, macro-interactionism, and policy-relevant research. I conclude by speculating about the future role of interactionism.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  lit_survey  20thC  social_theory  pragmatism  Mead  constructivism  microfoundations  methodology  causation-social  agency-structure  networks  organizations  self  identity  emotions  sociology  society  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  feminism  meaning  symbolic_interaction  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
JENNIFER KAHN Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? | NYT Mag Education Issue September 2013
Starting in the late 19th century, the philosopher John Dewey argued against the development of purely vocational elementary schools, insisting that the true purpose of schooling was not simply to teach children a trade but to train them in deeper habits of mind, including “plasticity” (the ability to take in new information and be changed by it) and interdependence (the ability to work with others).Social-emotional learning takes Dewey’s theory further, suggesting that all emotions — not just the right ones — are adaptive if properly managed. Studies have shown that people in a slightly sad mood are better at analyzing or editing a written document (they focus better on details), while people who are slightly angry are better able to discriminate between weak and strong arguments. The purpose of a social-emotional learning program, then, isn’t to elide emotion but to channel it: to surf the rapids rather than to be swamped by them. 
human_nature  emotions  reason  education  mind-body  cognition  neuroscience  Dewey  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Julian H. Franklin Philosophy and the State in France by Nannerl O. Keohane (1982)
JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 93, No. 1 (Oct., 1982), pp. 173-176 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his discussion of importance of moral philosophy and public-private re political for the French from the wars of religion (Montaigne) onwards
reviews  books  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  France  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  scepticism  Stoicism  emotions  self-interest  self-love  corruption  Montaigne  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Serap Ayşe Kayatekin: The relation of morality to political economy in Hume (2013) | Cambridge Journal of Economics
Cambridge Journal of Economics. (2013) doi: 10.1093/cje/bes072 First published online: January 29, 2013 -- In his Treatise of Human Nature, Hume argues that reason does not motivate action but rather directs our judgement by informing us about their causes and effects. He distances, in his argument, passions from reason by claiming that passions are not ideas, do not represent anything, are self-contained and thus cannot be contradictory to truth or reason. Moral judgements, according to Hume, are passions and as such they cannot be contrary to reason. For Hume, morality does not consist of immutable principles to be discovered by reason; it is based on human passions, which, through repetition, human beings come to associate with certain moral characteristics. Following on this statement, I here explore the following point: to the extent economic behaviour is determined by passions such as greed, benevolence and pleasure, we cannot separate economic activity and morality. As an extension, morality and political economy are inextricably linked in Hume. This suggests that ethics, through the study of morality and political economy, and the study of economic behaviour and institutions are inseparable subjects. It is interesting to observe this in the work of Hume, a fundamental influence on Adam Smith, one of the most important precursors of modern economics. The paper underlines the importance of understanding the evolution of the history of economic thinking that led to modern-day economics and which, though claiming Hume via Smith as one of its progenitors, argues for a complete separation of ethics and economics. In particular, the separation of positive from normative economics becomes infeasible in light of Hume’s analysis, rendering problematic the claim of modern economics that Hume is the founding father. -- Anatolia School of Arts, Sciences and Technology. I thank my co-editors, Alan Freeman and Vicky Chick, my colleague, Sheila Dow, and my friend, Antonio Callari, for incisive comments throughout the different phases of the writing of this paper. 
article  paywall  intellectual_history  economic_history  economic_theory  18thC  Hume  reason  moral_philosophy  emotions  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Jacques Bos: The rise and decline of character: humoral psychology in ancient and early modern medical theory (2009) | History of the Human Sciences - Sage
doi: 10.1177/0952695109104422 History of the Human Sciences July 2009 vol. 22no. 3 29-50 -- Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is character (êthos), which involves a view of human beings focused on clearly distinguishable psychological types that can be recognized on the basis of external signs. Psychological ideas based on humoral theory remained influential well into the early modern period. Yet, in 17th-century medicine and philosophy, humoral physiology and psychology started to lose ground to other theoretical perspectives on the mind and its relation to the body. This decline of humoralist medical psychology can be related to a broader reorientation of psychological thought in which the traditional concept of character lost its central position. Instead of the focus on types and stable character traits, a perspective emerged that was primarily concerned with individuality and transient passions.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  medicine  body  psychology  emotions  physiology  mind  mind-body  character  humours  moral_philosophy  rhetoric  Pope  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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