dunnettreader + economic_history   529

Politics and numbers | The Enlightened Economist
I’m thoroughly enjoying William Deringer’s Calculated Values: Finance, Politics and the Quantitative Age – almost finished. The book asks, why from the early…
reviews  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_history  economic_culture  economic_models  statistics  rhetoric-political  political_press  parties  partisanship  books  review  kindle-available  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
New industry clusters are springing up in the same old places
You have to love the fact that all four of China’s main private-sector express-delivery companies–the guys shuttling all those Taobao packages around the…
economic_history  economic_geography  Evernote  China-economy  Chinese_history  industry_clusters  from instapaper
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Bruce Campbell: The Great Transition, Lecture 1 of 4 - Ellen McArthur Lectures 2013, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
See his 2016 book with CUP - The Great Transition: Climate, Disease and Society in the Medieval World - kindle-available
Lecture schedule
Lecture 1 - The 14th century as tipping point: From one socio-ecological status quo to another
Lecture 2 - The enabling environment: The Medieval Solar Maximum and Latin Christendom's high-medieval efflorescence
Lecture 3 - A precarious balance: Mounting economic vulnerability in an era of increasing climatic instability
Lecture 4 - Disease intervenes: The Black Death and the 'Great Transition' to an alternative socio-ecological equilibrium
video  lecture  economic_history  social_history  environmental_history  disease  Black_Death  medieval_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  Italy  urbanization  foreign_trade  Mongols  Mamluks  spice_trade  Central_Asia  genetics  weather  agriculture  demography  economic_growth  climate-history  climate_change  Little_Ice_Age  Italy-cities  international_finance 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
(Url is a pdf) N. Cummins, M. Kelly & C. O'Grada - Living Standards and Plague in London, 1560–1665
Living Standards and Plague in London, 1560–1665.
Neil Cummins, Morgan Kelly, and Cormac Ó Gráda∗ 2015 forthcoming Economic History Review
Abstract -- We use records of 870,000 burials and 610,000 baptisms to recon- struct the spatial and temporal patterns of birth and death in London from 1560 to 1665, a period dominated by outbreaks of plague. The plagues of 1563, 1603, 1625, and 1665 appear of roughly equal mag- nitude, with deaths running at five to six times their usual rate, but the impact on wealthier central parishes falls markedly through time. Tracking the weekly spread of plague before 1665 we find a consis- tent pattern of elevated mortality spreading from the same two poor northern suburbs. Looking at the seasonal pattern of mortality, we find that the characteristic autumn spike associated with plague con- tinued in central parishes until the early 1700s, and in the poorer surrounding parishes until around 1730. Given that the symptoms of plague and typhus are frequently indistinguishable, claims that plague suddenly vanished from London after 1665 should be treated with caution. In contrast to the conventional view of London as an undif- ferentiated demographic sink we find that natural increase improved as smaller plagues disappeared after the 1580s, and that wealthier... Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
17thC  Black_Death  social_history  statistics  birth_rates  Mathusian_checks  living_standards  economic_history  medicine  political_arithmetick  death_rates  18thC  British_history  plague  London  demography  article  fertility  downloaded  16thC  spatial  segregation 
february 2017 by dunnettreader
Neil Cummins - Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800 (2014)
Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800
I analyze the age at death of 121,524 European nobles from 800 to 1800. Longevity began increasing long before 1800 and the Industrial Revolution, with marked increases around 1400 and again around 1650. Declines in violence contributed to some of this increase, but the majority must reflect other changes in individual behavior. The areas of North-West Europe which later witnessed the Industrial Revolution achieved greater longevity than the rest of Europe even by 1000 AD. The data suggest that the `Rise of the West' originates before the Black Death.
Downloaded WP version via iPhone to DBOX
lifestyle  16thC  10thC  13thC  14thC  17thC  11thC  paper  medieval_history  economic_history  life_expectancy  social_history  downloaded  12thC  elites  warrior_class  feudalism  18thC  British_history  nobles  wealth  Western_Europe  15thC  demography  9thC  landowners 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
G. Clark & N. Cummins - Malthus to modernity: wealth, status, and fertility in England, 1500–1879 (2015)
Journal of Population Economics
January 2015, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 3–29
Abstract -- A key challenge to theories of long-run economic growth has been linking the onset of modern growth with the move to modern fertility limitation. A notable puzzle for these theories is that modern growth in England began around 1780, 100 years before there was seemingly any movement to limit fertility. Here we show that the aggregate data on fertility in England before 1880 conceals significant declines in the fertility of the middle and upper classes earlier. These declines coincide with the Industrial Revolution and are of the character predicted by some recent theories of long-run growth.
Keywords: Fertility transition, Demographic transition, Preindustrial fertility
economic_growth  middle_class  article  19thC  paywall  16thC  British_history  fertility  marriage-age  social_history  18thC  status  economic_history  elites  17thC  demography  marriage  birth_control 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Reading: Barry Eichengreen (2011): Economic History and Economic Policy via Brad DeLong
Barry Eichengreen (2011): Economic History and Economic Policy - EHA Presidential Address 2011
As you read, formulate your answers to the following questions:
1. What does Eichengreen think are the uses of history, as shown in the use of history in trying to understand the macroeconomic crisis that began in 2008?
2.What does Eichengreen think are the abuses of history, as shown in the use of history in trying to understand the macroeconomic crisis that began in 2008?
3.What rules and approaches does Eichengreen arrive it for future people trying to use history better?
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
monetary_policy  historiography-postWWII  QE  fiscal_policy  unemployment  historiography-19thC  economic_history  economic_policy  Keynesianism  speech  FX-rate_management  downloaded  central_banks  Great_Depression  historiography  FX  austerity  financial_system  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  Minsky  historiography-20thC  FX-misalignment  Great_Recession  inflation 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - link to WP - Robert Allen (2004): Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe
Robert Allen (2004): Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe: "At the end of the middle ages, the urban, manufacturing core of Europe was on the Mediterranean with an important offshoot in Flanders... -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
improvement  development  urbanization  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  paper  economic_history  inequality  poverty  progress  downloaded  trade  economic_growth 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Barry Eichengreen - The Political Economy of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff (1986) - NBER
The Political Economy of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff
Barry Eichengreen
NBER Working Paper No. 2001
Issued in August 1986
NBER Program(s):   ITI   DAE   IFM
Economic histories of the interwar years view the Great Depression and the Smoot Hawley Tariff as inextricably bound up with one another. They assign a central role to the Depression in explaining the passage of the 1930 Tariff Act and at the same time emphasize the role of the tariff in the propogation of the Depression. This paper argues that popular accounts have conveyed what is at best an incomplete and at worst a misleading impression of the relationship between the tariff and the Depression. Rather than simply strengthening the hand of a Republican Executive predisposed toward protection or increasing the burden borne by a depressed agricultural sector, the uneven impact of the Depression occasioned the birth of a new protectionist coalition comprised of producers particularly hard hit by import competition: border agriculture and small-scale industry engaged in the production of speciality goods. Rather than leading to a dramatic across-the-board decline in the volume of U.S. imports, the tariff had very different effects across sectors. Rather than worsening the Great Depression by reducing foreign demands for U.S. exports, the direct macroeconomic effect of the tariff is likely to have been expansionary. This remains true even when feedbacks to the United States and foreign retaliation are analyzed. In any case, relative to the Depression, the direct macroeconomic effects of the tariff were small. If Smoot-Hawley had significant macroeconomic effects, these operated instead through its impact on the stability of the international monetary system and the efficiency of the international capital market.
competition-interstate  trade-agreements  economic_history  Great_Depression  NBER  trade  trade-policy  protectionism  economic_theory  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  revisionism  paywall  paper  Smoot-Hawley  race-to-the-bottom 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Joseph Joyce - Capital Flows and Financial Crises | Capital Ebbs and Flows - Oct 2016
Prof at Wellesley. The impact of capital flows on the incidence of financial crises has been recognized since the Asian crisis of 1997-98. Inflows before the crisis contributed to…
Pretty much my position re Chile's controls in 1990s - FDI good, portfolio vulnerable to hot money, bad, especially foreign-denominated debt, but also bank deposits attracted by interest rates but easily reversed. But they're finding that it's not just the flows that are destabilizing -- exchange rate appreciation comes with foreign capital buying debt assets as well. So much for developing local bond markets? -- See links to papers, tracking not just macro level but B-schools looking at firm-level incentives, who goes in for leverage, etc.
economic_history  financial_crisis  financialization  emerging_markets  capital_flows  FDI  capital_markets  sovereign_debt  FX-misalignment  FX  economic_policy  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Professor Rod O’Donnell - Keynes: the partly-known Colossus of economics - crowd-sourcing promo
Professor Rod O’Donnell , University of Technology Sydney, Australia Alongside Smith and Marx, Keynes is one of the triumvirate of economists on whom more ink…
Keynes  intellectual_history  20thC  WWI  pre-WWI  entre_deux_guerres  economic_history  economic_theory  crowd-sourcing  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Adair Turner - The Skills Delusion | Project Syndicate - Oct 2016
LONDON – Everybody agrees that better education and improved skills, for as many people as possible, is crucial to increasing productivity and living standards…
economic_growth  economic_models  economic_history  inequality  social_mobility  education-higher  education-training  skills  Labor_markets  wages  student_debt  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Vitor Gaspar - The Making of a Continental Financial System; Lessons for Europe from Early American History (2014) IMF working paper
Alexander Hamilton was the first U.S. Treasury Secretary from 1789 to 1795. When he started, the Federal Government was in default. During his tenure, U.S. Treasuries became the ultimate safe asset. He successfully managed expectations, achieved debt service reduction, and stabilized financial panics. He delivered sound public finances and financial stability. In the end, the U.S. possessed a modern financial system able to finance innovation and growth. At a time when Europe is working its way out of the sovereign debt crisis and implementing Banking Union and Financial Union, it is worthwhile to search for lessons from early U.S. history. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
paper  capital_markets  18thC  risk_assessment  European_integration  US_economy  sovereign_debt  economic_history  market_integration  Eurozone  political_economy  Germany-Eurozone  governance-regional  asset_prices  downloaded  US_history  Hamilton  federalism  regional_blocs 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Nina Boberg-Fazlic & Paul Sharp - Welfare Spending Lessons from Pre-Industrial England | LSE blogs - Oct 2016
Cutting welfare spending is unlikely to lead to an increase in private voluntary work and charitable giving, explain Nina Boberg-Fazlic and Paul Sharp. Using historical data from late eighteenth and early nineteenth century England, they illustrate how parts of the country that saw increased levels of spending under the Poor Laws also enjoyed higher levels of charitable income.
local_government  social_democracy  Poor_Laws  Labor_markets  UK_economy  Tories  welfare  Industrial_Revolution  unemployment  UK_politics  philanthropy  demography  British_history  19thC  economic_history  18thC  agriculture-productivity  landowners  population_growth 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Peter Solar - Poor Relief and English Economic Development before the Industrial Revolution (1995) | Economic History Review on JSTOR
The English system of poor relief helped to shape the country's distinctive pre-industrial economy. English relief, when set against continental experience, stands out as uniform and comprehensive in coverage; as reliant on local property taxation for funding; and as generous and reliable in benefits. The insurance provided by relief underpinned the growth of a mobile wage-labour force and facilitated changes inland tenure and use. The fiscal impact of relief expenditure gave taxpayers incentives to put labourers to work and to keep local demographic and economic development in balance.
agriculture-productivity  Labor_markets  economic_history  welfare  Industrial_Revolution  local_government  downloaded  jstor  agriculture  18thC  British_history  17thC  Poor_Laws  article  Europe-Early_Modern  19thC  demography  unemployment 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Acemoglu, Cantoni, Johnson
The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution
Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson and James A. Robinson
The American Economic Review
Vol. 101, No. 7 (DECEMBER 2011), pp. 3286-3307
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
commerce  urbanization  guilds  elites  republicanism  reform-legal  Rhineland  reform-political  Germany  economic_growth  political_economy  reform-economic  jstor  political_history  civil_code  French_Revolution  rule_of_law  institutional_economics  bourgeoisie  aristocracy  trade  article  downloaded  feudalism  economic_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 (2013) - European Economic History Review
The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (Naples) Italian National Research Council (CNR), malanima@issm.cnr.it The purpose of the article is to present the statistical reconstruction of a series of per capita output in central–northern Italy between 1300 and 1913. The various phases of both the statistical procedure and the results are presented and discussed. From the Renaissance until the 1880s, when modern growth starts, the curve of per capita GDP is downward bent. Output series together with three robustness tests, are collected in the Appendices.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
productivity  economic_growth  17thC  agriculture  18thC  16thC  Renaissance  economic_history  14thC  stats  urbanization  Italy  GDP  manufacturing  GDP-per_capita  economic_decline  downloaded  article  proto-industry  agriculture-productivity  19thC  commerce  15thC 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions (2013), in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th-18th Centuries
Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions, in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th- 18th Centuries, Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2014, II, pp. 677-88. - Multi-day conference - pdf of the paper contains schedule and Table of Contents - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
wages  social_order  legal_system  agriculture-surplus  downloaded  Eastern_Europe  labor  jurisdiction  elite_culture  prices  agriculture  nobility  Black_Death  agriculture-productivity  landowners  medieval_history  property_rights  peasants  Europe-Early_Modern  Western_Europe  conference  serfs  agriculture-markets  dispute_resolution  rural  economic_history  access_to_courts  feudalism  contract_law  Labor_markets  tenants  social_history  improvement  food  chapter  political_economy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Energy consumption in England
The displacement of the centre of the European economy from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic and the beginning of north–south divergence in Europe has been discussed on the basis of data on real wages, urbanization rates, and, more recently, estimates of gross domestic product for a number of European countries. The purpose of the present article is to contribute to this line of research with the elaboration of yearly series of total energy consumption in Italy and England for the long period 1560–1913. New data on energy services, energy intensity, and, finally, social savings from the use of energy are also presented and discussed for both Italy and England.These new data allow us to specify that energy played a central role.Yet it was relatively late that its importance as a provider of mechanical work developed fully; that is, from 1830 onwards in England and from the end of the nineteenth century in Italy. - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  economic_growth  pre-WWI  17thC  transport  manufacturing  energy  modernization  18thC  industrialization  energy-transition  energy-markets  Industrial_Revolution  economic_history  Italy  consumption  downloaded  19thC  article  energy-intensity  British_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Lemin Wu - Home - If Not Malthusian, Then Why? A Darwinian Explanation of the Malthusian Trap (July 2015)
His site with links to other work, CV etc - This paper shows that the Malthusian mechanism alone cannot explain the pre-industrial stagnation of living standards. Improvement in luxury technology, if faster than improvement in subsistence technology, would have kept living standards growing. The Malthusian trap is essentially a puzzle of balanced growth between the luxury sector and the subsistence sector. The author argues that balanced growth is caused by group selection in the form of biased migration. It is proven that a tiny bit of bias in migration can suppress a strong growth tendency. The theory re-explains the Malthusian trap and the prosperity of ancient market economies such as Rome and Sung. It also suggests a new set of factors triggering modern economic growth. - work up of his dissertation at Berkeley -- downloaded via Air, attached to Evernote
paper  economic_history  economic_growth  ancient_Rome  Chinese_history  Sung_dynasty  ancient_China  Malthusian_trap  demography  technology  agriculture  markets  elites  luxury  standard-of-living  migration  downloaded 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Spencer Dimmock -The Origins of Capitalism in England 1400-1600 (2015) | Haymarket Books
ISBN: 9781608464852 - Drawing on an impressive array of original archival research and a series of critiques of recent accounts of economic development in pre-modern England, The Origin of Capitalism in England 1400-1600 offers a rich and multi-layered account of the historical rupture in English feudal society that led to the first sustained transition to agrarian capitalism and the industrial revolution. Weaving together political, social, and economic themes, Spencer Dimmock makes the case that capitalism should be viewed as a form of society rather than narrowly as an economic system. This wide-ranging work convincingly argues that the beginnings of capitalist society must be firmly located in a precisely defined historical context, rather than through reference to evolutionary and transhistorical commercial developments. This novel approach is sure to stimulate a thorough reappraisal of current orthodoxies on the transition to capitalism. -- Spencer Dimmock Ph.D. (1999), University of Kent at Canterbury, is an Honorary Research Fellow in History at Swansea University. He has published many articles and chapter contributions on pre-modern England and Wales.
books  economic_history  British_history  15thC  16thC  capitalism 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Cummins, N., Kelly, M. and Ó Gráda, C - Living standards and plague in London, 1560–1665 - The Economic History Review (2016) - Wiley Online Library
Cummins, N., Kelly, M. and Ó Gráda, C. (2016), Living standards and plague in London, 1560–1665. The Economic History Review, 69: 3–34. doi:10.1111/ehr.12098This article uses individual records of 930,000 burials and 630,000 baptisms to reconstruct the spatial and temporal patterns of birth and death in London from 1560 to 1665, a period dominated by recurrent plague. The plagues of 1563, 1603, 1625, and 1665 appear of roughly equal magnitude, with deaths running at five to six times their usual rate, but the impact on wealthier central parishes falls markedly through time. Tracking the weekly spread of plague, we find no evidence that plague emerged first in the docks, and in many cases elevated mortality emerges first in the poor northern suburbs. Looking at the seasonal pattern of mortality, we find that the characteristic autumn spike associated with plague continued into the early 1700s. Natural increase improved as smaller crises disappeared after 1590, but fewer than half of those born survived childhood. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX
article  downloaded  social_history  economic_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  England  London  demography  urbanization  sanitation  plague  poverty 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Ball, The Water Kingdom: A Secret History of China – review - The Guardian - August 2016
Tourists watch floodwaters gushing out of the Xiaolangdi dam during a sand-washing operation of the Yellow river in Jiyuan, China, 2010.Photograph: Miao… Useless review the only thing mentioned is "thorough" - since the reviewer was only interested in China's history of millenia dominated by water politics, one assumes that if Ball had made a hash of it, the faults would have been mentioned - and since Ball is an excellent writer of non-fiction, the assumption is the book must be pretty good
Instapaper  books  kindle-available  Chinese_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Confucianism  Daoism  Asian_philosophy  China-governance  political_culture  political_economy  ancient_history  Chinese_politics  China  water  infrastructure  agriculture  economic_sociology  economic_history  social_order  hierarchy  institutions  institutional_capacity  transport  rivers  environment  pollution  industrialization  from instapaper
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Olivier Blanchard & Michael Kremer - Disorganization - Quarterly Journal of Economics (1997)
Abstract
Under central planning, many firms relied on a single supplier for critical inputs. Transition has led to decentralized bargaining between suppliers and buyers. Under incomplete contracts or asymmetric information, bargaining may inefficiently break down, and if chains of production link many specialized producers, output will decline sharply. Mechanisms that mitigate these problems in the West, such as reputation, can only play a limited role in transition. The empirical evidence suggests that output has fallen farthest for the goods with the most complex production process, and that disorganization has been more important in the former Soviet Union than in Central Europe. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
trust  Russia  information-asymmetric  20thC  privatization  industrialization  reputation  Eastern_Europe  risk_management  article  Central_Asia  economic_history  information-markets  transition_economies  supply_chains  manufacturing  downloaded  post-Cold_War 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Iryna Stewen & Mathias Hoffmann - Holes in the Dike: the global savings glut, US house prices & the long shadow of banking deregulation (2015 wp)
Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy with number 112834. -- Abstract -- We explore empirically how capital inflows into the US and financial deregulation within the United States interacted in driving the run-up (and subsequent decline) in US housing prices over the period 1990-2010. To obtain an ex ante measure of financial liberalization, we focus on the history of interstate-banking deregulation during the 1980s, i.e. prior to the large net capital inflows into the US from China and other emerging economies. Our results suggest a long shadow of deregulation: in states that opened their banking markets to out-of-state banks earlier, house prices were more sensitive to capital inflows. We provide evidence that global imbalances were a major positive funding shock for US wide banks: different from local banks, these banks held a geographically diversified portfolio of mortgages which allowed them to tap the global demand for safe assets by issuing private-label safe assets backed by the country-wide US housing market. This, in turn, allowed them to expand mortgage lending and lower interest rates, driving up housing prices. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
banking  financial_crisis  deregulation  US_economy  downloaded  financial_regulation  global_imbalance  capital_markets  post-Cold_War  financial_system  interstate_banking  savings  house_prices  securitization  financial_innovation  interest_rates  mortgages  international_finance  capital_flows  community_banks  paper  21stC  economic_history  competition-interstate  NBFI 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Kevin O'Rourke and Alan Taylor - Democracy and Protectionism (2006)
Abstract
Does democracy encourage free trade? It depends. Broadening the franchise involves transferring power from non-elected elites to the wider population, most of whom will be workers. The Hecksher-Ohlin-Stolper-Samuelson logic says that democratization should lead to more liberal trade policies in countries where workers stand to gain from free trade; and to more protectionist policies in countries where workers will benefit from the imposition of tariffs and quotas. We test and confirm these political economy implications of trade theory hypothesis using data on democracy, factor endowments, and protection in the late nineteenth century. -- published in MIT Press collection in honor of Jeffrey Williamson - The New Comparative Economics -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
working_class  economic_history  business-and-politics  protectionism  political_participation  trade  government-forms  trade-policy  downloaded  democracy  political_economy  elites  paper 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Peter A.G. van Bergeijk - The heterogeneity of world trade collapses
Abstract
This paper analyses drivers of imports during the major world trade collapses of the Great Depression (1930s; 34 countries) and the Great Recession (1930s; 173 countries). The analysis deals with the first year of these episodes and develops a small empirical model that shows a significant impact of the development of GDP, the share of manufacturing goods in total imports and the political system. The analysis reveals substantial heterogeneity with respect to regional importance of these drivers. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
public_policy  political_participation  economic_growth  global_economy  economic_history  political_economy  trade-policy  paper  institutions  government-forms  business-and-politics  international_political_economy  global_system  downloaded  trade  Great_Recession 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
R. Esteves - The Political Economy of Global Financial Liberalisation in Historical Perspective (2011) Oxford Economic and Social Sciences WP
Abstract
This paper is a first attempt to garner the theory and evidence on the political economy of the first wave of financial liberalisation during the nineteenth and early twentieth century, and of its demise after World War I. Not everyone gained from the process of globalisation (of trade, labour, and finance), which brought about important changes in the structure of the economy and the distribution of income in nations across the world. This paper explores how the economic incentives generated by these dislocations translated, through the political system, into choices about openness to foreign capital and financial integration. The period before World War I is remarkable by the almost absence of restrictions on cross-border capital flows, which may explain the little attention it has received in the historical literature, compared to the extensive study of trade protectionism in this period. After the War, many countries experimented with capital controls which varied in nature and intensity and were intensified during the Depression. Despite the attempt made here to reconcile these stylized facts to models of political economy, the analysis requires a better empirical foundation and some suggestions for further research are also proposed. - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX.
financial_regulation  economic_growth  pre-WWI  20thC  protectionism  downloaded  gold_standard  international_finance  financial_system  trade-policy  trade  19thC  capital_flows  capital_controls  globalization  deregulation  free_trade  paper  economic_history  financial_innovation  political_economy 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Atif Mian, Amir Sufi - Who Bears the Cost of Recessions? The Role of House Prices and Household Debt | NBER -:May 2016
NBER Working Paper No. 22256 -- This chapter reviews empirical estimates of differential income and consumption growth across individuals during recessions. Most existing studies examine the variation in income and consumption growth across individuals by sorting on ex ante or contemporaneous income or consumption levels. We build on this literature by showing that differential shocks to household net worth coming from elevated household debt and the collapse in house prices play an underappreciated role. Using zip codes in the United States as the unit of analysis, we show that the decline in numerous measures of consumption during the Great Recession was much larger in zip codes that experienced a sharp decline in housing net worth. In the years prior to the recession, these same zip codes saw high house price growth, a substantial expansion of debt by homeowners, and high consumption growth. We discuss what models seem most consistent with this striking pattern in the data, and we highlight the increasing body of macroeconomic evidence on the link between household debt and business cycles. Our main conclusion is that housing and household debt should play a larger role in models exploring the importance of household heterogeneity on macroeconomic outcomes and policies.
paper  paywall  NBER  economic_history  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  debt_crisis  debt-overhang  business_cycles  house_prices  mortgages  consumer_demand  US_economy 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Atif R. Mian, Amir Sufi, Emil Verner - Household Debt and Business Cycles Worldwide | NBER - Sept 2015
An increase in the household debt to GDP ratio in the medium run predicts lower subsequent GDP growth, higher unemployment, and negative growth forecasting errors in a panel of 30 countries from 1960 to 2012. Consistent with the “credit supply hypothesis,” we show that low mortgage spreads predict an increase in the household debt to GDP ratio and a decline in subsequent GDP growth when used as an instrument. The negative relation between the change in household debt to GDP and subsequent output growth is stronger for countries that face stricter monetary policy constraints as measured by a less flexible exchange rate regime, proximity to the zero lower bound, or more external borrowing. A rise in the household debt to GDP ratio is contemporaneously associated with a consumption boom followed by a reversal in the trade deficit as imports collapse. We also uncover a global household debt cycle that partly predicts the severity of the global growth slowdown after 2007. Countries with a household debt cycle more correlated with the global household debt cycle experience a sharper decline in growth after an increase in domestic household debt.
paper  paywall  NBER  economic_history  post-WWII  housing  house_prices  mortgages  interest_rates  business_cycles  debt_crisis  debt-overhang  debt-restructuring  macroeconomic_policy  consumer_demand  global_economy  global_financial_cycle  economic_growth 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
G Clark, KH O'Rourke, AM Taylor - The Growing Dependence of Britain on Trade during the Industrial Revolution | NBER - Feb 2014
The Growing Dependence of Britain on Trade during the Industrial Revolution -- Gregory Clark, Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke, Alan M. Taylor -- NBER Working Paper No. 19926 -- Many previous studies of the role of trade during the British Industrial Revolution have found little or no role for trade in explaining British living standards or growth rates. We construct a three-region model of the world in which Britain trades with North America and the rest of the world, and calibrate the model to data from the 1760s and 1850s. We find that while trade had only a small impact on British welfare in the 1760s, it had a very large impact in the 1850s. This contrast is robust to a large range of parameter perturbations. Biased technological change and population growth were key in explaining Britain's growing dependence on trade during the Industrial Revolution.
paper  paywall  NBER  economic_history  British_history  UK_economy  trade  Industrial_Revolution  technology  technology-adoption  demography  18thC  19thC 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Dietrich Vollrath - The Early Transformation of Britain's Economy | Growth Economics
On Wallis et al WP - Structural Change in the British economy 1500-1800 - Your Bayesian prior on “the probability the Great Divergence had its origins prior to the Industrial Revolution” should get updated to a higher number. - These numbers are bad news if you have “Glorious Revolution” in the “monocausal origins of economic growth” office pool. The data reinforce the argument that the Glorious Revolution was as much a response to economic change, as it was a cause of economic change.Britain experiencing a structural change from 1550 to 1750 does not mean it was already experiencing sustained growth. The growth experienced in that period may well have been snuffed out by Malthusian forces of population growth in time. But perhaps that structural change helped bring on the changes in demographic behavior that allowed sustained growth to occur? This structural shift bleeds directly into the Industrial Revolution, which bleeds directly into the demographic shifts involved with sustained growth. Whether this implies a chain of causality is too much to make of this evidence. - downloaded paper to Tab S2
paper  Great_Divergence  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  economic_history  agriculture  economic_growth  Malthusian  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
William F. Maloney, Felipe Valencia Caicedo - Economic Activity in the Americas- A landscape that Columbus would recognise | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal -June 2016
14 June 2016
The persistence of economic fortune over the long run has been the subject of intense research. This column investigates the persistence of patterns of economic activity in the Americas at the sub-national level over the last half millennium. The location of today’s prosperous cities and regions within each country is closely correlated with the location of indigenous population centres before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492. Policymakers seeking to make radical changes in the spatial distribution of economic activity should be mindful of the centuries-old, even pre-colonial, forces working against them. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
21stC  North_America  transport  geography  18thC  economic_history  paper  indigenous_peoples  agriculture  17thC  urbanization  19thC  downloaded  Latin_America  20thC  16thC  colonial_era  transport-overland 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Alan Greer - Commons and Enclosure in the Colonization of North America | American Historical Review
On Junto March Madness list - The American Historical Review (2012) 117 (2): 365-386. doi: 10.1086/ahr.117.2.365 - WHAT WERE THE BROAD PROCESSES by which settlers of European stock created new forms of tenure and wrested control of lands from indigenous peoples, first in the Americas and later across wide stretches of Africa and Oceania? Anyone interested in this basic question about colonization and dispossession in an Atlantic world setting may be tempted to think in terms of a great “enclosure movement” that took shape first in England and Western Europe and then extended overseas to the New World, bringing survey lines, fences, and legal rules fostering exclusive access and transferability. More than one historian has pointed in the direction of such an extended conception of enclosure, although none has so far made the case in detail. (...) In relation to the 18thC and 19thC, EP Thompson has also pointed to a connection between enclosure within England and the imposition of private property across the overseas British Empire, notably in India, where the Permanent Settlement of Bengal (1793) represented a particularly brutal and doctrinaire attempt to establish unitary proprietorship over land. Thompson's argument about enclosure and colonization appeared in an essay published late in his life, (...). Richly suggestive, it remains schematic and preliminary, pointing to a long‐term global movement to privatize the commons that emanated outward from the British Isles. Certainly, there is an intriguing, if rough, coincidence of peak periods of enclosure in England—the Tudor period and the late 18thC—with times of imperial expansion and reinvigoration. - good tour d'horizon of lit on settler colonialism as well as East Asia property relations creation - and different takes on Locke - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  social_history  legal_history  British_Empire  settler_colonies  property  property_rights  commons  enclosure  property-confiscations  North_America  American_colonies  Australia  New_Zealand  India  India-British_Empire  political_economy  political_history  historiography  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  downloaded 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Paul Slack - Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England (2009)| JSTOR
Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England
Paul Slack
The Economic History Review
New Series, Vol. 62, No. 3 (Aug., 2009), pp. 576-603
Downloaded via iPhone to Sente
trade-policy  British_foreign_policy  17thC  British_Empire  inequality  article  agriculture  moral_economy  British_history  economic_growth  transport  downloaded  labor  trade  property_rights  progress  colonialism  mercantilism  ports  jstor  political_arithmetick  Sente  political_economy  improvement  economic_history  infrastructure 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - Robber Barons: Honest Broker/Hoisted from 1998
Matthew Josephson called them 'Robber Barons'. He wanted readers to think back to their European history classes, back to thugs with spears on horses who did…
Instapaper  political_economy  economic_history  US_history  US_economy  US_politics  economic_growth  economic_policy  economy-structure  investment  19thC  20thC  pre-WWI  entre_deux_guerres  robber_barons  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Price V. Fishback - How Successful Was the New Deal? The Microeconomic Impact of New Deal Spending and Lending Policies in the 1930s | NBER January 2016
NBER Working Paper No. 21925 -- The New Deal during the 1930s was arguably the largest peace-time expansion in federal government activity in American history. Until recently there had been very little quantitative testing of the microeconomic impact of the wide variety of New Deal programs. Over the past decade scholars have developed new panel databases for counties, cities, and states and then used panel data methods on them to examine the examine the impact of New Deal spending and lending policies for the major New Deal programs. In most cases the identification of the effect comes from changes across time within the same geographic location after controlling for national shocks to the economy. Many of the studies also use instrumental variable methods to control for endogeneity. The studies find that public works and relief spending had state income multipliers of around one, increased consumption activity, attracted internal migration, reduced crime rates, and lowered several types of mortality. The farm programs typically aided large farm owners but eliminated opportunities for share croppers, tenants, and farm workers. The Home Owners’ Loan Corporation’s purchases and refinancing of troubled mortgages staved off drops in housing prices and home ownership rates at relatively low ex post cost to taxpayers. The Reconstruction Finance Corporation’s loans to banks and railroads appear to have had little positive impact,although the banks were aided when the RFC took ownership stakes. -- paywall on SSRN
paper  SSRN  paywall  economic_history  20thC  Great_Depression  New_Deal  entre_deux_guerres  Keynesianism  housing  mortgages  banking  agriculture  demand-side  government-roles  government_finance  microeconomics 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Quaker bankers: building trust on the basis of sincerity, reciprocity and charity | Magic, Maths & Money - Feb 2016
This post follows discussions of the norms sincerity, reciprocity and charity in financial markets. It suggests that the success of Quaker finance, that funded… Tracks the importance of Quaker-owned banks to the development of UK financial system - the number of big-name banking families with Quaker founders is striking. Their personalized methods of working on reputation (theirs and their borrowers) based on shared standards of probity and transparency, disciplined by membership in the Quaker community - allowed them to not only grow in the loan business, but become big in the bills market. The Quaker method of collecting views re appropriate moral life practices, which were documented and circulated among the members - and set mutual expectations for ethical practices, including areas like bookkeeping and full disclosure. The Quaker firms were central to the system of country banks, capable of providing liquidity to halt bank runs, wind down problem institutions etc. Their bills business didn't survive the switch to the Bank of England becoming lender of last resort in the 1844 crisis. And their information advantages don't seem to have remained a competitive advantage as it had been in the pre Napoleonic_Wars era.
Instapaper  economic_history  financial_innovation  banking  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Quakers  dissenters  Industrial_Revolution  ethics  norms  norms-business  accounting  accountability  reputation  disclosure  information-intermediaries  information-markets  money_market  Bank_of_England  country_banks  financial_crisis  bank_runs  lender-of-last-resort  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - Inequality: the structural aspects - February 2016
Despite the unprecedented attention that income and wealth inequality has received in this year’s presidential campaign in the United States and in several…
Instapaper  inequality-global  inequality-wealth  inequality-opportunity  inequality  political_economy  polarization  economic_growth  economic_history  labor_share  Latin_America  mobility  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Michael Mann, review essay on 8 books on slavery and abolition, especially in South Asia and British Empire | H-Net Reviews - Jan 2016
Michael Mann. Review of Campbell, Gwyn; Elizabeth Elbourne, Sex, Power, and Slavery and Campbell, Gwyn; Stanziani, Alessandro, Bonded Labour and Debt in the Indian Ocean World and Harms, Robert; Freamon, Bernard K.; Blight, David W., Indian Ocean Slavery in the Age of Abolition and Major, Andrea, Slavery, Abolitionism and Empire in India, 1772-1843 and Miller, Joseph, The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach and Mulligan, William; Bric, Maurice, A Global History of Anti-Slavery Politics in the Nineteenth Century and Retzlaff, Carolin, »Wont the law give me my freedom?«: Sklaverei vor Gericht (1750-1800). H-Soz-u-Kult, H-Net Reviews. January, 2016. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  social_history  economic_history  political_history  18thC  19thC  slavery  Indian_Ocean  South_Asia  British_Empire  abolition  labor_history  globalization  transnational_elites  networks-exchange  networks-information  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
M. Ali Khan, The Irony in/of Economic Theory | JSTOR - MLN Vol. 108, No. 4 (Sep., 1993)
MLN, Vol. 108, No. 4, French Issue (Sep., 1993), pp. 759-803 -- DOI: 10.2307/2904961 -- via Eric Schliesser, attack on lack of reflexive thought by economists about the nature of their own enterprise and the assumptions undergirding their work -- starts with Samuelson's justification of the language of mathematics, and includes discussion of Kenneth Boulding's attack on his own profession for its failure to engage in philosophy of science, referring back positively to Veblen's critique -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  economic_models  history_of_science  history-and-social_sciences  economic_history  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  mathematization  Methodenstreit  Samuelson  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Guillaume Calafat & Éric Monnet - Le retour de l’histoire économique ? - La Vie des idées - 5 janvier 2016
Le récent succès d’ouvrages d’histoire économique, alors même que cette spécialité paraît souvent négligée à l’université, ainsi que des évolutions disciplinaires simultanées, font espérer de nouveaux rapprochements entre l’histoire et l’économie. -- downloaded pdf to Note
economic_history  economic_theory  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  trade  trade-cultural_transmission  networks-information  networks-business  development  sociology_of_knowledge  economic_sociology  economic_culture  econometrics  consumer_revolution  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
M Funke, M Schularick, C Trebesch - The political aftermath of financial crises: Going to extremes | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 21 November 2015
Recent events in Europe provide ample evidence that the political aftershocks of financial crises can be severe. This column uses a new dataset that covers elections and crises in 20 advanced economies going back to 1870 to systematically study the political aftermath of financial crises. Far-right parties are the biggest beneficiaries of financial crises, while the fractionalisation of parliaments complicates post-crisis governance. These effects are not observed following normal recessions or severe non-financial macroeconomic shocks.
economic_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  financial_crisis  political_culture  democracy  right-wing  extremism  governance 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Monetary history - rural finance in northwest Europe from c 1400 | Real-World Economics Review Blog
a) Since at least 1400 rural lending and borrowing was at least in some regions common and tied to the life cycle of households and families, which (though…
Instapaper  economic_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  financial_innovation  rural  Netherlands  agriculture  family  inheritance  marriage  households  collateral  banking  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
JAMES LIVESEY, review essay - Berkeley, Ireland and 18thC Intellectual History (Aug 2015) | Cambridge Journaks - Modern Intellectual History Modern Intellectual History - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY INTELLECTUAL HISTORY - Cambridge Journals O
Modern Intellectual History / Volume 12 / Issue 02 / August 2015, pp 453-473
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013) (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010) (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition
books  reviews  article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Berkeley  British_history  Three_Kingdoms  Church_of_England  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Atlantic  economic_history  financial_system  finance_capital  credit  Glorious_Revolution  colonialism  Protestant_Ascendancy 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Haldane: Labour's Share - speech to TUC | Bank of England - Nov 2015 - via Brad DeLong
Good overview of recent work on last 300 years by economic historians and technology impact projections -- lots on internal structural shifts within "labor" and vis a vis capital -- downloaded pdf to Note
speech  economic_history  labor_history  labor_share  Labor_markets  wages  productivity  productivity-labor_share  unemployment  skills  services  AI  IT  unions  UK_economy  monetary_policy  macroeconomic_policy  public_sector  Industrial_Revolution 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Guido Alfani, Wouter Ryckbosch - Income inequality in pre-industrial Europe | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 06 November 2015
Thomas Piketty and others have prompted renewed interest in understanding long-term patterns of inequality. This column presents evidence from pre-industrial Europe. Inequality rose even during the success stories of early modern Europe, but it can hardly have been the sole requisite for growth. In both economic history and today’s economic theory, the idea of a universal trade-off between growth and inequality needs to be replaced by stronger attention to social processes and institutional developments. -- brief but extensive lit review of how thinking of economic historians has been evolving -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_growth  inequality  capital_formation  new_institutionalism  institutional_economics  political_economy  state-building  nation-state  human_capital  urbanization  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  wages  growth-equity_tradeoff  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Florence Jaumotte, Carolina Osorio Buitron - Union power and inequality | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 22 October 2015
IMF research department -- Inequality in advanced economies has risen considerably since the 1980s, largely driven by the increase of top earners’ income shares. This column revisits the drivers of inequality, emphasising the role played by changes in labour market institutions. It argues that the decline in union density has been strongly associated with the rise of top income inequality and discusses the multiple channels through which unionisation matters for income distribution. -- very interesting all the variables they looked at and excluded -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  political_economy  economic_history  20thC  21stC  OECD_economies  post-Cold_War  labor_share  labor_law  unions  executive_compensation  inequality  wages  wages-minimum  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Joram Mayshar, Omer Moav, Zvika Neeman, Luigi Pascali - The Neolithic roots of economic institutions | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 11 September 2015
Conventional theory suggests that hierarchy and state institutions emerged due to increased productivity following the Neolithic transition to farming. This column argues that these social developments were a result of an increase in the ability of both robbers and the emergent elite to appropriate crops. Hierarchy and state institutions developed, therefore, only in regions where appropriable cereal crops had sufficient productivity advantage over non-appropriable roots and tubers. -- I.e. Eurasia, not Sub-Saharan Africa
paper  economic_history  pre-historical_people  development  institutional_economics  institutions  state-building  state-roles  agriculture  elites  violence  hierarchy  Sub-Saharan_Africa  geography  geography-and-economics 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Eacott - Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830 (2016) | UNC Press
Linking four continents over three centuries, Selling Empire demonstrates the centrality of India--both as an idea and a place--to the making of a global British imperial system. In the seventeenth century, Britain was economically, politically, and militarily weaker than India, but Britons increasingly made use of India’s strengths to build their own empire in both America and Asia. Early English colonial promoters first envisioned America as a potential India, hoping that the nascent Atlantic colonies could produce Asian raw materials. When this vision failed to materialize, Britain’s circulation of Indian manufactured goods--from umbrellas to cottons--to Africa, Europe, and America then established an empire of goods and the supposed good of empire. Eacott recasts the British empire's chronology and geography by situating the development of consumer culture, the American Revolution, and British industrialization in the commercial intersections linking the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. From the seventeenth into the nineteenth century and beyond, the evolving networks, ideas, and fashions that bound India, Britain, and America shaped persisting global structures of economic and cultural interdependence. -- Jonathan Eacott is associate professor of history at the University of California, Riverside.
books  economic_history  British_Empire  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  colonialism  settler_colonies  South_Asia  North_America  West_Indies  slavery-Africans  commerce  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  East_India_Company  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark G. Hanna - Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740 (Nov 2015) | UNC Press
Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England's burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns. English piracy and unregulated privateering flourished in the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean because of merchant elites' active support in the North American colonies. Sea marauders represented a real as well as a symbolic challenge to legal and commercial policies formulated by distant and ineffectual administrative bodies that undermined the financial prosperity and defense of the colonies. Departing from previous understandings of deep-sea marauding, this study reveals the full scope of pirates' activities in relation to the landed communities that they serviced and their impact on patterns of development that formed early America and the British Empire. -- Mark G. Hanna is associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. -- cover is the portrait of the Earl of Warwick
books  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  West_Indies  North_America  Atlantic  colonialism  privateers  piracy  economic_history  maritime_history  settler_colonies  commerce  trade  Navigation_Acts  Board_of_Trade  East_India_Company  Indian_Ocean  Pacific  ports  maritime_law  commercial_law  Warwick_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Egmont Kakarot-Handtke - Schumpeter and the Essence of Profit :: SSRN - May 2011, update May 2015
University of Stuttgart - Institute of Economics and Law -- Schumpeter had a clear vision of the developing economy, but he did not formalize it. The quest for a germane formal basis is in the following guided by the general question: what is the minimum set of foundational propositions for a consistent reconstruction of the evolving money economy? We start with three structural axioms. The claim of generality entails that it should be possible to free Schumpeter’s approach from its irksome Walrasian legacy and to give a consistent formal account of the elementary circular flow that served him as a backdrop for the analysis of the entrepreneur-driven market system. -- Pages in PDF File: 28 -- Keywords: new framework of concepts, structure-centric, axiom set, profit, money, credit, structural stress, catching-up process, monopoly -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  economic_theory  economic_history  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Schumpeter  economic_growth  economic_sociology  entrepreneurs  profit  investment  Innovation  creative_destruction  money  markets-structure  monopoly  prices  firms-theory  neoclassical_economics  equilibrium  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert O. Keohane, review - Mancur Olson, The Rise and Decline of Nations (1983) | JSTOR
Reviewed Work: The Rise and Decline of Nations: Economic Growth, Stagflation, and Social Rigidities. -- Journal of Economic Literature
Vol. 21, No. 2 (Jun., 1983), pp. 558-560 -- quite positive, but useful on where Olson's theory has blind spots -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  political_economy  economic_history  economic_growth  interest_groups  collective_action  international_political_economy  institutional_economics  rational_choice  rationality-economics  rationality  stagnation  rent-seeking  politics-and-money  status  status_quo_bias  social_order  hierarchy  change-social  change-economic  castes  discrimination  inequality  mobility  post-WWII  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Joel Mokyr, Chris Vickers, and Nicolas L. Ziebarth - The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different? | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 31-50
Technology is widely considered the main source of economic progress, but it has also generated cultural anxiety throughout history. The developed world is now suffering from another bout of such angst. Anxieties over technology can take on several forms, and we focus on three of the most prominent concerns. First, there is the concern that technological progress will cause widespread substitution of machines for labor, which in turn could lead to technological unemployment and a further increase in inequality in the short run, even if the long-run effects are beneficial. Second, there has been anxiety over the moral implications of technological process for human welfare, broadly defined. While, during the Industrial Revolution, the worry was about the dehumanizing effects of work, in modern times, perhaps the greater fear is a world where the elimination of work itself is the source of dehumanization. A third concern cuts in the opposite direction, suggesting that the epoch of major technological progress is behind us. Understanding the history of technological anxiety provides perspective on whether this time is truly different. We consider the role of these three anxieties among economists, primarily focusing on the historical period from the late 18th to the early 20th century, and then compare the historical and current manifestations of these three concerns. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  technology  18thC  20thC  21stC  Industrial_Revolution  change-economic  change-social  unemployment  labor_history  robotics  AI  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  labor_share  labor-service_sector  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Cragg and Rand Ghayad - Growing Apart: The Evolution of Income vs. Wealth Inequality | The Economists' Voice - July 2015
Michael Cragg and Rand Ghayad are employed by The Brattle Group. -- The gap between the richest Americans and the rest of the nation has changed dramatically over the past three decades – becoming one of the most challenging political and economic trends for the nation. For decades prior to that, the distribution of wealth and income had been relatively stable, so much that a central problem posed in the economics literature was to explain this stability. But beginning in the early 1980s, inequality began to grow rapidly and has recently been attracting substantial attention from policymakers and researchers reflecting a widespread concern that reflecting a widespread concern that growing labor incomes of senior executives, finance professionals, and successful entrepreneurs is entailing large economic costs to society. The dominant paradigm in the media and Washington is that inequality is purely a matter of divergence in earned (labor) income inequality which can be ameliorated by making earned income taxes more progressive and shifting spending to help the poorer. However, this is not the story: wealth inequality, as it turns out, is much worse. This warrants emphasis for a variety of reasons: (1) a growing body of research that suggests that in the head-on comparison it is wealth inequality, rather than income inequality or poverty that has a negative, statistically significant effect on economic growth.1 (2) Historically societies have failed when wealth has become overly concentrated; and (3) the wedge between earned and unearned income tax rates reduces progressivity as capital income rises. We offer a number of solutions which should generate debate amongst economists as they test conventional wisdom.
paper  paywall  economic_history  economic_growth  inequality  inequality-wealth  labor_share  wages 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeet Heer - Sex, Economics, and Austerity | The American Prospect - 2013
John Maynard Keynes was the sexiest economist who ever lived. This might seem like half-hearted praise since in our mind’s eye the typical economist appears as… On the decades of right-wing attacks on Keynes and Keynesianism using sexual "immorality" as linked to purported moral failings of Keynes' policy responses from Versailles onward.
article  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  21stC  Keynes  Keynesianism  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  Great_Depression  right-wing  neoconservatism  fiscal_policy  budget_deficit  austerity  economics-and-morality  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Accounts and holding to account | Enlightened Economist - August 2015
I *loved* Jacob Soll’s The Reckoning: Financial Accountability and the Making and Breaking of Nations. It gives a long historical perspective on accountancy – no, wait – and particularly its importance in literally holding leaders and politicians to account. The book’s message is that there is a constant tension between the increasing sophistication of methods of accounting to hold to account, literally, kings or powerful companies or political leaders and the scope that sophistication creates for new ways of defrauding the people or the shareholders. So the methods of accountancy need to be embedded in a culture of honest dealing.
review  economic_history  institution-building  accountability  institutional_capacity  public_finance  self-regulation  accounting  government_officials  government_finance  books  trust  financial_system  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, Maurice Obstfeld - Understanding past and future financial crises | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal
Summary of their long paper, see bookmark -- Reposted 21 July 2015 - What explains the different effects of the crisis around the world? This column compares the 2007–09 crisis to earlier episodes of banking, currency, and sovereign debt distress and identifies domestic-credit booms and real currency appreciation as the most significant predictors of future crises, in both advanced and emerging economies. It argues these results could help policymakers determine the need for corrective action before crises hit. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  20thC  financial_crisis  emerging_markets  capital_flows  credit_booms  leverage  business_cycles  FX-rate_management  FX  Great_Recession  bibliography  links  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas and Maurice Obstfeld - Stories of the 20thC for the 21stC | CEPR via Ideas.repec.org
A key precursor of twentieth-century financial crises in emerging and advanced economies alike was the rapid buildup of leverage. Those emerging economies that avoided leverage booms during the 2000s also were most likely to avoid the worst effects of the twenty-first century’s first global crisis. A discrete-choice panel analysis using 1973-2010 data suggests that domestic credit expansion and real currency appreciation have been the most robust and significant predictors of financial crises, regardless of whether a country is emerging or advanced. For emerging economies, however, higher foreign exchange reserves predict a sharply reduced probability of a subsequent crisis. -- enormous lit review bibliography, see references links on Ideas page -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  20thC  financial_crisis  emerging_markets  capital_flows  credit_booms  leverage  business_cycles  FX-rate_management  FX  Great_Recession  bibliography  links  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
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