dunnettreader + ecclesiology   41

David Loades - Foxe in theological context | The Acts and Monuments Online
Foxe in theological context
by David Loades
The issues covered by the trials and inquisitions which Foxe narrates in these books are limited and endlessly repetitive. Christology is hardly ever discussed. The taking of oaths and obedience to secular authority are raised in some cases, usually when the inquisitors are trying to pin charges of anabaptism on their victims. In the unusual case of Cranmer considerable use is made of 'lawful authority', because of his own high profile insistence upon obedience to the Royal Supremacy. Foxe is always at pains to ensure that his martyrs insist upon the lawfulness of oaths. Obedience is more difficult, and the normal response is 'we must obey God rather than man'. However this is always qualified by some statement to the effect that a Christian who is required by his conscience to disobey a lawful command will submit willingly to the penalties prescribed. Foxe is extremely sensitive to the catholic charge that protestantism is a religion of disobedience.The issues which dominate the great majority of trials are: vernacular liturgy and scripture, and the nature and number of the sacraments.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Reformation  Protestants  religious_belief  religious_practices  sacraments  transubstantiation  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  hierarchy  ecclesiology  Papacy  purgatory  indulgences  dogmatism  church_history  sola_scriptura 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Saeculum: History & Society in the Theology of St Augustine (1970, rev 2007) | Cambridge University Press
Significant intro to rev'd edition, included in downloaded frontmatter along with TOC and original Preface. -- In this book Professor Markus's main concern is with those aspects of Augustine's thought which help to answer questions about the purpose of human society, and particularly with his reflections on history, society and the Church. He relates Augustine's ideas to their contemporary context and to older traditions, and shows which aspects of his thought he absorbed from his intellectual environment. Augustine appears from this study as a thinker who rejected the 'sacralization' of the established order of society, and the implications of this for a theology of history are explored in the last chapter. -- Downloaded frontmatter, excerpt & index via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_history  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  Augustine  human_nature  eschatology  social_order  Providence  teleology  religion-established  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  Roman_Empire  paganism  pluralism  secularism  Roman_religion  secularization  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus The End of Ancient Christianity (1990) |Cambridge University Press
Highly recommended by Patrick Boucheron -- This study is concerned with one, central historical problem: the nature of the changes that transformed the intellectual and spiritual horizons of the Christian world from its establishment in the fourth century to the end of the sixth. Why, for example, were the assumptions, attitudes and traditions of Gregory the Great so markedly different from those of Augustine? The End of Ancient Christianity examines how Christians, who had formerly constituted a threatened and beleaguered minority, came to define their identity in a changed context of religious respectability in which their faith had become a source of privilege, prestige and power. Professor Markus reassesses the cult of the martyrs and the creation of schemes of sacred time and sacred space, and analyzes the appeal of asceticism and its impact on the Church at large. These changes form part of a fundamental transition, perhaps best described as the shift from "Ancient" toward "Medieval" forms of Christianity; from an older and more diverse secular culture towards a religious culture with a firm Biblical basis. -- Downloaded TOC, Preface & excerpt via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Christianity  Roman_Empire  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  paganism  secularization  Roman_religion  pluralism  eschatology  Augustine  Gregory_the_Great  Church_history  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
RB Outhwaite - The Rise and Fall of the English Ecclesiastical Courts, 1500–1860 (2007) | Cambridge University Press
The first history of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in England that covers the period up to the removal of principal subjects inherited from the Middle Ages. Probate, marriage and divorce, tithes, defamation, and disciplinary prosecutions involving the laity are all covered. All disappeared from the church's courts during the mid-nineteenth century, and were taken over by the royal courts. The book traces the steps and reasons - large and small - by which this occurred.
Downloaded 1st 10 pgs Ch 1 via Air
1. The ecclesiastical courts: structures and procedures
2. The business of the courts, 1500–1640
3. Tithe causes
4. Wills and testamentary causes
5. Defamation
6. Matrimonial litigation and marriage licenses
7. Office causes
8. The roots of expansion and critical voices
9. Charting decline, 1640–1830
10. Explaining decline
11. The Bills of 1733–1734
12. Snips and repairs: small steps to reform, 1753–1813
13. Royal commissions and early fruits, 1815–1832
14. Reform frustrated
15. Reforms thick and fast, 1854–1860.
books  downloaded  legal_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Church_of_England  legal_system  church_courts  religion-established  family  marriage  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  inheritance  property  trusts  dispute_resolution  reform-social  reform-legal  morality-Christian  local_government  local_politics  discipline  punishment  authority  hierarchy  governing_class  governance-church  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
David Brakke - Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas | The Great Courses
Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas
Professor of religious studies and history at Ohio State
24 lectures
Uniformly rave reviews from people with good academic background in Early Christianity and comparative religion
Neoplatonism  theology  eschatology  ecclesiology  manichaean  gnostic  heterodoxy  creation  late_antiquity  hermeneutics  Early_Christian  archaeology  esotericism  manuscripts  audio  proto-orthodox  evil  soteriology  church_history  video  religious_history  courses  Trinity  God-attributes  heresy 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Anthony Favier - Catholics and gender - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French version 2014)
Translated by Kate McNaughton -- Tags : catholicism | gender | homosexuality | marriage | education | feminism -- The criticism of “gender theory” that is expressed in some Catholic circles is not just a travesty of gender studies: it detracts from the development of a feminist theology and current efforts at establishing a dialogue within the Catholic Church -- tracks the history of hysterical anti-feminism and anti gender studies wrapped up with counter-revolution post Vatican II -- studying "gender" as a social and cultural phenomenon became the boogeyman for Catholic focus on the threats of liberal modernity to "Catholic anthropology" -- the hot button issues of reproductive rights, women in positions in the Church, and acknowledgement of homosexuality and gay marriage. After decades of overt hostile opposition, the French Church is sending out a new generation of Jesuit scholars to start distinguishing between the realities of cultural bases of gender vs the "extreme ideology" that has been labeled "gender theory." A 2014 statement on family by French bishops acknowledges much of "gender studies" as common sense, FREX how inequalities of power are implicated in many gender-defined social roles -- which they distinguish from rabid gender ideology. -- saved to Instapaper
20thC  21stC  Catholics  France  feminism  homosexuality  gender  Papacy  Vatican_II  ecclesiology  politics-and-religion  family  civil_liberties  equality  Jesuits  culture_wars  cultural_change  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Diarmaid MacCulloch - Putting the English Reformation on the Map: The Prothero Lecture | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 15 (2005), pp. 75-95
The essay examines how the international Protestant identity of the English Church came to be in tension with the later assertion of sacramentalist or Catholic values within it. It chronicles how the Reformation in England came to align not with Lutheranism but with Reformed Protestantism, and compares Henry VIII's reforms with contemporary Reformations in mainland Europe seeking a 'middle way'. Edward VI's Church is contrasted with the temperature perceptible in Elizabeth I's religious settlement - which nevertheless asserted Protestant values with no concessions to Catholicism. The anomalous role of the cathedrals in England is identified as a major source of the English Church's later deviation from mainstream European Reformed Protestantism, which itself produced attempts to recreate a Reformed Church in the English north American colonies. -- tackles branch of Anglican historiography that buries the Protestant Reformation aspects of the Church of England especially the 16thC -- didn't download
article  jstor  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvinist  Tudor  Henry_VIII  Edward_VI  Elizabeth  theology  ecclesiology  via_media  Catholics-England  liturgy  sacraments  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, eds. & trans. Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert - Online Library of Liberty
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, edited, translated, and with an Introduction by Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1926> -- The essays selected here for translation derive largely from Thomasius’s work on Staatskirchenrecht, or the political jurisprudence of church law. These works, originating as disputations, theses, and pamphlets, were direct interventions in the unresolved issue of the political role of religion in Brandenburg-Prussia, a state in which a Calvinist dynasty ruled over a largely Lutheran population and nobility as well as a significant Catholic minority. In mandating limited religious toleration within the German states, the provisions of the Peace of Westphalia (1648) also provided the rulers of Brandenburg-Prussia with a way of keeping the powerful Lutheran church in check by guaranteeing a degree of religious freedom to non-Lutherans and thereby detaching the state from the most powerful territorial church. Thomasius’s writings on church-state relations, many of them critical of the civil claims made by Lutheran theologians, are a direct response to this state of affairs. At the same time, owing to the depth of intellectual resources at his disposal, these works constitute a major contribution to the broader discussion of the relation between the religious and political spheres. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  Prussia  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  Lutherans  Calvinist  Catholics  confessionalization  religion-established  politics-and-religion  church_courts  tolerance  religious_culture  political_culture  Westphalia  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull (1698), ed. Simone Zurbuchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull, ed. and with an introduction by Simone Zurbuchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/887> -- written in response to Revocation of the Edict of Nantes -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Pufendorf  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Edict_of_Nantes  religion-established  civil_society  tolerance  sovereignty  ecclesiology  natural_law  natural_rights  religious_belief  British_politics  1690s  dissenters  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott - The Philosophy of Religion in England and America (1901) - Google Books
Downloaded pdf to Note -- interesting from standpoint of how he classifies the philosophical elements - e.g. lumps Bolingbroke with Berkeley and Butler, not with Deists or Hume - clearly doesn't see how similar Bolingbroke and Hume really were, unlike Warburton who grasped it; also doesn't sneer like Leslie Stephen -- a specimen of fin de siècle academic professionalization after the divinity training raison d'être and "vocation" of Anglo-American universities had evaporated
books  etexts  Google_Books  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  British_history  US_history  reason  revelation  cosmology  God-attributes  God-existence  creation_ex_nilho  creation  scepticism  theism  Cambridge_Platonists  Locke-religion  Deism  rational_religion  natural_religion  materialism  mind-body  mind-theory_of  idealism-transcendental  subjectivism  Butler  Berkeley  Bolingbroke  theodicy  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  ecclesiology  Hegelian  British_Idealism  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  obligation  intuitionism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dale Van Kley, review essay, Where the Rot Started? - Brad S. Gregory, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society - | Books and Culture
Excellent essay -- Gregory places almost all blame on the Protestants for the disunity of Christendom, marginalization of religious institutions and thought, and horrors of modern age, including moral relativism and global warming. Like Gillespie, puzzling stress on Dun Scotus ("univocal being") and William of Ockham (nominalism) for (enabling? producing?) a cosmos in which scientific inquiry could dispense with God. Gregory omits a number of factors on the Catholic side (beyond the Lutheran Reformation itself that the Papacy might have handled via reforms instead of confrontation and denial of fallibility). Van Kley's list of factors (especially French) that Gregory omits -- (1) splits in Catholicism throughout middle ages, e.g. frequent appearance of latent heresies if reformers couldn't get a new order founded; (2) Papal alliance with secular rulers to stamp out conciliar movement and reinforce papal infallibility - made compromise with Luther etc impossible and still inhibits any meaningful ecumenism; (3) Counter-Reformation shift from assessing theological grounds of specific doctrines to asserting absolute unchallengable authority based on external marks (as defined by Catholics) of the true church - a style of argument that wasn't going to survive sola scriptura, new science, Enlightenment etc; (4) Papal overreaction that stamped out Gallican and liberal Catholicism, which in turn stimulated anticlericalism and anti-regime sentiments from both left and right, thereby reducing the flexibility of the Ancien Regime to address social and economic problems or reform institutions; (5) a counter-revolutionary anti-intellectual unholy alliance between Papacy and Jansénistes that produced the uncompromising radicalism of laïcité. And that's not all Van Kley covers.
books  reviews  kindle-available  historiography  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  theology  ecclesiology  Christianity  Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  Protestants  modernity  relativism  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Jansenists  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-revolution  politics-and-religion  secularization  secularism  heterodoxy  heresy  Gallican  Absolutism  liberalism  self  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  natural_law  nominalism  Duns_Scotus  medieval_philosophy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Philip Jenkins: Jesus Wars: How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two Emperors Decided What Christians Would Believe for the Next 1,500 Years | Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Book List starred review - The fifth-century Christian church faced a doctrinal issue, now largely forgotten, that precipitated intramural Christian savagery unparalleled until the 11-centuries-later Thirty Years’ War. The bone of contention was the nature of Jesus Christ. That he wasn’t a mere man was indisputable. But was he a human-divine cross-breed, so to speak, or was he purely divine and his human body an illusion? Neither was accepted, but the conclusion of the council of Chalcedon in 451 that he was fully divine and fully human—that is, said dissidents, of two natures—incensed those who held he was of one nature, entirely divine. The fight broke out well before Chalcedon, entailing the death-from-assault of the patriarch of Constantinople during the 449 council of Ephesus, thereafter disowned as the “Gangster Synod.” Chalcedon eventually triumphed, but not until well after 250 years of intermittent violence in which monks behaved like the Waffen SS. Jenkins condenses centuries of church and imperial strife with admirable clarity despite the continuous blizzard of historical names and ecclesiastical terms the narrative entails. He suggests that this era, not the later Dark and Middle Ages, is the most violent (un-Christian?) in Christian history and that it may have lessons for the present and future conflict between Christians and Muslims over the nature of God. --Ray Olson
books  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  5thC  late_antiquity  Christology  theology  ecclesiology  Church_Fathers  church_councils  violence  religious_wars  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. A. Prior - Ecclesiology and Political Thought in England, 1580-c. 1630 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 2005), pp. 855-884
This article examines the ways in which debates on ecclesiology in the Church of England served as a venue for the examination of political precept. It argues in particular that polemical sources - whether sermons, pamphlets, or longer works - reveal that discussion of conformity, the nature of the church, and its doctrine and discipline led to a broader examination of law, sovereignty, parliament, and the political costs of religious discord. Underlying the dispute was a fundamental tension over civil and sacred authority, and the relationship between politics - the realm of human custom and history - and doctrine - the realm of the divine and immemorial. The article offers a number of revisions to current discussions of the history of political thought, while pointing to the importance of religious discourse for our understanding of the political tensions that existed in the years prior to the English civil war. -- extensive bibliography across political and religious history and political thought, theology and ecclesiology -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_lit  ecclesiology  Laudian  Calvinist  Puritans  godly_persons  theocracy  Erastianism  political_philosophy  political_press  political_culture  politics-and-religion  divine_right  monarchy  commonwealth  authority  legitimacy  sovereignty  Parliament  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David R. Como - Predestination and Political Conflict in Laud's London | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 263-294
This article examines the policy pursued by William Laud during his tenure as bishop of London, focusing specifically on the way in which he enforced the various royal edicts against discussion of predestination. It is argued that Laud enforced Charles I's decrees in an unbalanced manner, attacking Calvinists while apparently leaving their anti-Calvinist opponents untouched. It is likewise argued, however, that this strategy was accomplished not through a policy of overt judicial persecution, but through a more subtle regime of quiet threat and harassment. Such a policy was necessary because, at least in London, the question of predestination had by 1629 become a serious and explosive issue, one that was inextricably linked in the minds of many observers to more explicitly 'secular' matters of government and policy. In the process of examining Laud's strategy, the article seeks to untangle the question of why both the Caroline authorities and their enemies saw the seemingly scholastic question of predestination as a matter of such crucial political significance. Ultimately, the article helps to revise our understanding of the political atmosphere that prevailed in England at the outset of the personal rule, while likewise contributing to a deeper understanding of the political breakdown that led to civil war and revolution in the 1640s. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  predestination  Calvinist  Arminian  Laud  Laudian  Puritans  godly_persons  London  City_politics  ecclesiology  clergy  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_culture  popular_politics  Absolutism  ritual  sacraments  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Questier - Arminianism, Catholicism, and Puritanism in England during the 1630s | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 53-78
The relationship between Arminianism and Roman Catholicism in the early Stuart period has long been a source of historiographical controversy. Many contemporaries were in no doubt that such an affinity did exist and that it was politically significant. This article will consider how far there was ideological sympathy and even rhetorical collaboration between Caroline Catholics and those members of the Church of England whom both contemporaries and modern scholars have tended to describe as Arminians and Laudians. It will suggest that certain members of the English Catholic community actively tried to use the changes which they claimed to observe in the government of the Church of England in order to establish a rapport with the Caroline regime. In particular they enthused about what they perceived as a strongly anti-puritan trend in royal policy. Some of them argued that a similar style of governance should be exercised by a bishop over Catholics in England. This was something which they believed would correct the factional divisions within their community and align it more effectively with the Stuart dynasty. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  Puritans  Laudian  Charles_I  ecclesiology  clergy  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  faction  popery  Catholics-England  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
GIDEON MAILER -- NEHEMIAS (SCOTUS) AMERICANUS: ENLIGHTENMENT AND RELIGION BETWEEN SCOTLAND AND AMERICA | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 1 (MARCH 2011), pp. 241-264
Historiographical Review -- This review assesses scholarly attempts to synthesize various forms of Scottish philosophy in the context of eighteenth-century America. It suggests potential new directions for the study of Scottish Enlightenment ethical theories on the western side of the Atlantic, and then examines scholarship on a separate and neglected Scottish influence in American thought: an evangelical notion of religious authority that was not opposed to wider incorporation in multi-denominational political unions. The ideological basis for American independence owed much to a tense counterpoise between Scottish moral sense reasoning and Presbyterian evangelicalism, rather than to their singular and starkly binary contributions to colonial American ideology. -- paywall
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ecclesiology  politics-and-religion  religion-established  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_sentiments  Presbyterians  Evangelical  American_colonies  American_Revolution  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
DMITRI LEVITIN -- MATTHEW TINDAL'S "RIGHTS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH" (1706) AND THE CHURCH—STATE RELATIONSHIP | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 717-740
Matthew Tindal's Rights of the Christian church (1706), which elicited more than thirty contemporary replies, was a major interjection in the ongoing debates about the relationship between church and state in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Historians have usually seen Tindal's work as an exemplar of the 'republican civil religion' that had its roots in Hobbes and Harrington, and putatively formed the essence of radical whig thought in the wake of the Glorious Revolution. But this is to misunderstand the Rights. To comprehend what Tindal perceived himself as doing we need to move away from the history of putatively 'political' issues to the histories of ecclesiastical jurisprudence, patristic scholarship, and biblical exegesis. The contemporary significance of Tindal's work was twofold: methodologically, it challenged Anglican patristic scholarship as a means of reaching consensus on modern ecclesiological issues; positively, it offered a powerful argument for ecclesiastical supremacy lying in crown-in-parliament, drawing on a legal tradition stretching back to Christopher St Germain (1460—1540) and on Tindal's own legal background. Tindal's text provides a case study for the tentative proposition that 'republicanism', whether as a programme or a 'language', had far less impact on English anticlericalism and contemporary debates over the church—state relationship than the current historiography suggests. -- extensive references of Cambridge_School articles, refers to Goldie a great deal, whether for support of particular episodes or to attack is unclear -- the quarrel over patristic claims of the Church_of_England important for Bolingbroke's argument re Tillotson etc -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  ecclesiology  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  patristic_scholarship  Biblical_exegesis  Erastianism  crown-in-parliament  Whigs-Radicals  anticlerical  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  civil_religion  High_Church  Convocation  Tindal_Matthew  free-thinkers  religious_lit  political_press  pamphlets  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roman Curia - Index
THE ROMAN CURIA

In exercising supreme, full, and immediate power in the universal Church, the Roman pontiff makes use of the departments of the Roman Curia which, therefore, perform their duties in his name and with his authority for the good of the churches and in the service of the sacred pastors.
CHRISTUS DOMINUS, 9

Sections of the site under the tab Roman Curia

Secretariat of State
Congregations
Tribunals
Pontifical Councils
Synod of Bishops
Offices
Pontifical Commissions
Swiss Guard
Labour Office of the Apostolic See
Pontifical Academies
Pontifical Committ

Institutions Connected with the Holy See

Vatican Secret Archives
Vatican Apostolic Library
Vatican Press
L'Osservatore Romano
Vatican Publishing House
Vatican Radio
Vatican Television Center
Papal Basilica of St Peter in Vatican City
Papal Basilica of St John Lateran
Papal Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls
Papal Basilica of St Mary Major
Office of Papal Charities
Agency for the Evaluation and Promotion of Quality
in Ecclesiastical Universities and Faculties (AVEPRO)
Financial Information Authority
website  Catholics  Papacy  ecclesiology  theology  diplomacy  religion  university  libraries  religious_lit  charity  canon_law  Italy 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Pope John Paul II : Redemptoris Missio (On Evangelization) - Catholic Culture
Apostolic Exhortation, Mission of the Redeemer, of Pope John Paul II promulgated on December 7, 1990.
20thC  Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Vatican II: Decree on the Mission Activity of the Church (Ad Gentes) - Catholic Culture
This decree of the Second Vatican Council was proclaimed by His Holiness, Pope Paul VI, on December 7, 1965.
20thC  Catholics  Vatican_II  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Pope issues first Apostolic Exhortation: Evangelii Gaudium | Vatican News Nov 2013
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Pope Francis has issued his first Apostolic Exhortation on Tuesday, Evangelii Gaudium, translated into English as The Joy of the Gospel. The 224-page document outlines the Pope’s vision for a missionary Church, whose “doors should always be open”. The Pope speaks on numerous themes, including evangelization, peace, homiletics, social justice, the family, respect for creation, faith and politics, ecumenism, interreligious dialogue, and the role of women and of the laity in the Church.
Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  21stC  religious_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Press conference on Pope Francis' Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel) - Vatican News Nov 2013
Pope Francis has issued his first Apostolic Exhortation on Tuesday, Evangelii Gaudium, translated into English as The Joy of the Gospel. The 224-page document outlines the Pope’s vision for a missionary Church, whose “doors should always be open”. The Pope speaks on numerous themes, including evangelization, peace, homiletics, social justice, the family, respect for creation, faith and politics, ecumenism, interreligious dialogue, and the role of women and of the laity in the Church.

At a press conference in the Vatican on Tuesday for the presentation of Pope Francis’ new Apostolic Exhortation, the presidents of the Pontifical Councils for evangelisation and communications, plus the secretary general of the Synod of Bishops, spoke about the themes contained in the 224 page document.

Please find below the English translations of the presentations, firstly by Archbishop Rino Fisichella, president of the Pontifical Council for New Evangelisation, secondly, by Archbishop Claudio Celli, president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications and thirdly, by Archbishop Lorenzo Baldisseri, secretary general of the Synod of Bishops:
21stC  Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Mark Goldie - Subjects and Sovereigns: The Grand Controversy over Legal Sovereignty in Stuart England by C. C. Weston; J. R. Greenberg (1983)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 26, No. 4 (Dec., 1983), pp. 1029-1030 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- nice little essay on what goes wrong when try to map Left-Right assumptions re political theory since antiquity onto 17thC English religious politics -- the players in fact don't wind up where the authors put them, ignoring the discrepancies
books  reviews  political_history  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  dissenters  Whigs  Tories  Absolutism  tolerance  political_culture  religious_culture  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Parliament  sovereignty  Locke  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Marvell  Erastianism  ecclesiology  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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