dunnettreader + domination   15

Robert S. Taylor - Market Freedom as Antipower (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Historically, republicans were of different minds about markets: some, such as Rousseau, reviled them, while others, like Adam Smith, praised them. The recent republican resurgence has revived this issue. Classical liberals such as Gerald Gaus contend that neorepublicanism is inherently hostile to markets, while neorepublicans like Richard Dagger and Philip Pettit reject this characterization—though with less enthusiasm than one might expect. I argue here that the right republican attitude toward competitive markets is celebratory rather than acquiescent and that republicanism demands such markets for the same reason it requires the rule of law: because both are essential institutions for protecting individuals from arbitrary interference. I reveal how competition restrains—and in the limit, even eradicates— market power and thereby helps us realize "market freedom," i.e., freedom as nondomination in the context of economic exchange. Finally, I show that such freedom necessitates "Anglo-Nordic" economic policies. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
Pettit  capitalism-alternatives  downloaded  markets_in_everything  capitalism-varieties  republicanism  bibliography  political_economy  Rousseau  Smith  market_failure  markets-dependence_on_government  jstor  commerce-doux  freedom  domination  market_fundamentalism  Gaus_Gerald  markets  political_theory  capitalism  article  competition  markets-structure 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Jason Frank - Review essay, Democracy and Domination in America (2012) | Political Theory on JSTOR
Reviewed Works:
In The Shadow of Dubois:Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams;
The Undiscovered Dewey:Religion, Morality, and the Ethos of Democracy by Melvin L. Rogers
Review by: Jason Frank
Political Theory
Vol. 40, No. 3 (June 2012), pp. 379-386
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41703030
Page Count: 8
Downloaded via Air to Dbox
downloaded  books  reviews  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  US_history  US_politics  Douglass  Dubois  Dewey  political_philosophy  political_participation  domination  liberty  liberalism  republicanism  slavery  racial_discrimination  identity_politics  deliberative_democracy  democracy 
april 2017 by dunnettreader
Vincent Dubois - Les champs de l'action publique (2010) in Hilgers (M.), dir., Utiliser la théorie des champs pour comprendre le monde social
L'analyse des politiques publiques a forgé ses propres notions pour décrire les espaces relationnels dans lesquels les politiques sont conduites. La sociologie des champs demeure en revanche très peu mobilisée dans ce domaine. Elle peut pourtant s'avérer utile pour objectiver l'espace de production des politiques, reconstituer les relations entre cet espace spécifique et ceux auxquels les politiques sont destinées ou, plus largement, ceux qui prennent part aux échanges qui les constituent. Elle offre ce faisant un point d'appui décisif pour la sociologie de l'action publique. -- Politique, Religion, Institutions et Sociétés : Mutations Européennes - Groupe de Sociologie Politique Européenne (PRISME-GSPE) CNRS : UMR7012 – Université de Strasbourg -- Mots-Clés : Politique publique – sociologie des champs – champs – action publique – rapports – domination – légitimation -- site archives HAL-SHS :: [halshs-00498020, version 1] -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  social_sciences  public_policy  sociology_of_fields  public_sphere  legitimacy  domination  political_science  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Ford, Jane (2013) Vampiric enterprise: metaphors of economic exploitation in the literature and culture of the fin de siecle. PhD thesis, University of Portsmouth.
This thesis is about the complex network of metaphors that emerged around late 19thC conceptions of economic self-interest — predatory, conflictual and exploitative basis of relations between nations, institutions, sexes and people in an outwardly belligerent fin-de-siècle economy. This thesis is about the vampire, cannibal and related genera of economic metaphor which penetrate many of the major discourses of the period. In chapters that examine socialist fiction and newspapers; the imperial quest romance; inter-personal intimacies in the writing of Henry James and Vernon Lee; and the Catholic novels of Lucas Malet, I assess the breadth and variety of these metaphors, and consider how they filter the concept of the conflictual ‘economic man’ . The thesis builds on Maggie Kilgour’s "From communion to cannibalism: an anatomy of metaphors of incorporation" (1990), which traces the genealogy – in literature from Homer to Melville – of what she terms ‘metaphors of incorporation’. These are metaphors that originate from a inside-outside binary and involve the assimilation or incorporation of an external reality. Kilgour attempts to demonstrate that with the increasing isolation of the modern individual .. acts of ‘incorporation’ previously imagined as symbiotic, were later conceived as cannibalistic. --However, deploying a combination of historicist and, at times, Post-Structuralist approaches, this thesis demonstrates that these metaphors refuse to accommodate themselves to a simple unified vision of the kind advanced by Kilgour. I map the complexities of these metaphors, explaining how they originate from divergent teleological impulses and how they articulate both simple ideological operations, and more complex feelings of ambivalence about economic realities in the cultural moment of the Victorian fin-de-siècle.
thesis  cultural_history  literary_history  social_history  political_history  IR_theory  IR  19thC  Fin-de-Siècle  20thC  political_economy  political_press  fiction  novels  James_Henry  laisser-faire  domination  imperialism  homo_economicus  socialism  class_conflict  individualism  alienation  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Todd Cronan, lead remarks& forum - Do We Need Adorno? | nonsite.org
Participants - Todd Cronan, Emory University, Michael W. Clune, Case Western Reserve University, Nicholas Brown, UIC, Jennifer Ashton, UIC, Chris Cutrone, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Marnin Young, Yeshiva University
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_history  political_economy  economic_theory  US_economy  Marx  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  classes  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  human_capital  neoliberalism  inequality  domination  Communist_Party  alienation  cultural_critique  Leftist  labor  leisure  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - Self-government: The Master Trope of Republican Liberty | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 84, No. 1 (JANUARY 2001), pp. 60-76
Slotting republicanism into a more extensive notion of negative liberty misses the self-government theme from Plato rational governance of tripartite soul. Looks at Harrington and Price in that tradition. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  liberty-positive  liberty-negative  republicanism  neo-republicanism  domination  self-government  Plato  Harrington  Price_Richard  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue - Civic Republicanism and Political Philosophy | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 84, No. 1, JANUARY 2001
(1) Cosmopolitan Republicanism: Citizenship, Freedom and Global Political Authority (pp. 3-21) James Bohman. *--* (2) On the Modern Relevance of Old Republicanism (pp. 22-44) Alain Boyer. *--* (3) Republican Liberty and Resilience (pp. 45-59)
Geoffrey Brennan and Alan Hamlin. *--* (4) Self-government: The Master Trope of Republican Liberty (pp. 60-76) Vivienne Brown. *--* (5) Pettit's Republic (pp. 77-97) John Ferejohn. *--* (6) Domination: A Preliminary Analysis (pp. 98-112)
Francis N. Lovett. *--* (7) Prospects for a Contemporary Republicanism (pp. 113-130) Gurpreet Rattan
journal  article  jstor  political_philosophy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  neo-republicanism  domination  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  cosmopolitanism  citizens  political_participation  governance  global_governance  sovereignty  authority  Pettit  Rawls 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
NADIA URBINATI - Competing for Liberty: The Republican Critique of Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 106, No. 3 (August 2012), pp. 607-621
Freedom as non-domination has acquired a leading status in political science. As a consequence of its success, neo-roman republicanism also has achieved great prominence as the political tradition that delivered it. Yet despite the fact that liberty in the Roman mode was forged not only in direct confrontation with monarchy but against democracy as well, the relationship of republicanism to democracy is the great absentee in the contemporary debate on non-domination. This article brings that relationship back into view in both historical and conceptual terms. It illustrates the misrepresentations of democracy in the Roman tradition and shows how these undergirded the theory of liberty as non-domination as a counter to politial equality as a claim to taking part in imperium. In so doing it brings to the fore the "liberty side" of democratic citizenship as the equal rights of all citizens to exercise their political rights, in direct or indirect form. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  republicanism  democracy  citizens  domination  political_participation  concepts-change  neo-republicanism  Europe-Early_Modern  17thC  18thC  Harrington  Sidney  commonwealth  common_good  representative_institutions  liberty-positive  liberty  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Patchen Markell - The Insufficiency of Non-Domination | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Feb., 2008), pp. 9-36
This essay argues that the neo-Roman republican principle of "non-domination," as developed in the recent work of Philip Pettit, cannot serve as a single overarching political ideal, because it responds to only one of two important dimensions of concern about human agency. Through critical engagements with several aspects of Pettit's work, ranging from his philosophical account of freedom as "discursive control" to his appropriation of the distinction between dominium and imperium, the essay argues that the idea of domination, which responds to concerns about "control," needs to be supplemented by the idea of usurpation, which responds to questions about "involvement"; and it shows how attention to both domination and usurpation (and to the interaction between them) can shed light on such phenomena as imperialism, slavery, and democracy. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  neo-republicanism  Pettit  domination  liberty-positive  imperialism  slavery  democracy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel I. O'Neill - Burke on Democracy as the Death of Western Civilization | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jan., 2004), pp. 201-225
This essay concerns Edmund Burke's view of the civilizing process. It begins by developing Burke's revision of Scottish Enlightenment historiography from the perspective of his own earlier treatise on aesthetics. Here, the argument is that Burke saw Western civilization as guaranteed by two institutions, the "sublime" church and the "beautiful" nobility, that jointly produced the requisite level of "habitual social discipline" in the masses necessary for the "natural aristocracy" to govern. The article's central argument is that Burke saw the Revolutionaries' destruction of these two institutions, and especially their subsequent attempt to replace them with political democracy undergirded by policies of social and cultural democratization, as marking the literal end of Western civilization itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_politics  French_Revolution  counter-revolution  Burke  Western_civ  aesthetics  sublime  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  nobility  aristocracy  aristocracy-natural  domination  hierarchy  social_order  deference  political_culture  governing_class  elites  democracy  political_participation  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  Scottish_Enlightenment  civilizing_process  manners  politeness  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Horacio Spector - Four Conceptions of Freedom | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 6 (December 2010), pp. 780-808
Contemporary political philosophers discuss the idea of freedom in terms of two distinctions: Berlin's famous distinction between negative and positive liberty, and Skinner and Pettit's divide between liberal and republican liberty. In this essay I proceed to recast the debate by showing that there are two strands in liberalism, Hobbesian and Lockean, and that the latter inherited its conception of civil liberty from republican thought. I also argue that the contemporary debate on freedom lacks a perspicuous account of the various conceptions of freedom, mainly because it leaves aside the classic contrast between natural liberty and civil liberty. Once we consider both the negative/positive distinction and the natural/civil one, we can classify all conceptions of freedom within four basic irreducible categories. In light of the resulting framework I show that there are two distinct conceptions of republican liberty, natural and civil, and that the former is coupled with an ideal of individual self-control. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  liberty  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  republicanism  neo-republicanism  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  domination  slavery  natural_rights  civil_liberties  Hobbes  Locke  Berlin_Isaiah  Skinner  Pettit  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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