dunnettreader + domesticity   6

Kristin M. Girten - Unsexed Souls: Natural Philosophy as Transformation in Eliza Haywood's Female Spectator (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 55-74 -- Though love and marriage are Eliza Haywood's central concerns in The Female Spectator, the first periodical written by a woman with a primarily female audience in mind, in a series of issues devoted to the study of Baconian empiricism, Haywood turns her attention away from such concerns to the natural world. This essay aims to determine what is at stake in the Female Spectator's philosophical interactions with nature. It argues that, for Haywood, natural philosophy is a tool with which women may expand the horizon of, and thereby reshape, the sphere to which they are consigned.-- lots of primary sources from Margaret Cavendish and Robert Boyle through 1st few decades of 18thC plus lit survey on gender, patriarchy etc in last few decades in literary history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  gender_history  17thC  18thC  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  women-intellectuals  empiricism  Haywood  1700s  1710s  Boyle  virtue_epistemology  self-development  self-knowledge  domesticity  science-public  publishing-women  Spectator  Cavendish_Margaret  Astell  bibliography 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC and Introduction, Nicholas Rogers - Making the English Middle Class, ca. 1700-1850 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4, Oct., 1993
Introduction (pp. 299-304) Nicholas Rogers [downloaded] *--* (1) "A Just and Profitable Commerce": Moral Economy and the Middle Classes in 18thC London (pp. 305-332) Susan E. Brown [questions "aristocratic century" - independent merchants and bourgeoisie in leading charities, urban politics, polite culture etc. Didn't fit a consistent deference pattern; members of middle class could be on all sides of Poor Laws, so Thompson's bipolar moral economy overstates lack of variation in middle and intermediary functions, especially when drawing on civic traditions that didn't depend on aristocracy leadership] *--* (2) Racism, Imperialism, and the Traveler's Gaze in 18thC England (pp. 333-357) Margaret Hunt [unenlightened middle class elements eg freemasonry could be as xenophobic as cosmopolitan; attention to racial, ethnic difference could also be used to stigmatise the poor and set middle class apart] *--* (3) The Masonic Moment; Or, Ritual, Replica, and Credit: John Wilkes, the Macaroni Parson, and the Making of the Middle-Class Mind (pp. 358-395) John Money. *--* (4) "Middle-Class" Domesticity Goes Public: Gender, Class, and Politics from Queen Caroline to Queen Victoria (pp. 396-432) Dror Wahrman [middle class as defenders of family, domesticity, separate spheres only after won political status in 1832 - nobody adopted Hannah More's vision until decades later - use of the term by others or as self identifier is all over the map, even in the same report or work, stabilizing only c 1830s] -- downloaded Rogers pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  urbanization  urban_politics  urban_elites  middle_class  aristocracy  politeness  consumerism  travel  xenophobia  racism  poverty  Poor_Laws  merchants  mercantilism  commercial_interest  interest_groups  corporatism  free_trade  Freemasonry  gender  family  domesticity  moral_economy  creditors  debtors  dissenters  local_government  political_nation  oligarchy  Parliament  anti-Jacobin  Loyalists  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  imperialism  London  status  rank  nouveaux_riches  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900 - TOC -- JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12, 2002
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900: A Conference Held at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California, and the Institute of Historical Research, University of London -- Introduction (pp. 263-266) John Tosh. -- (1) From Civilitas to Civility: Codes of Manners in Medieval and Early Modern England (pp. 267-289) John Gillingham. -- (2) Rank, Manners and Display: The Gentlemanly House, 1500-1750 (pp. 291-310) Nicholas Cooper. -- (3) The Uses of Eighteenth-Century Politeness (pp. 311-331) Paul Langford. -- (4) Polite 'Persons': Character, Biography and the Gentleman (pp. 333-354) Philip Carter. -- (5) Topographies of Politeness (pp. 355-374) R. H. Sweet. -- (6) Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England (pp. 375-394) Helen Berry. -- 7) Creating a Veil of Silence? Politeness and Marital Violence in the English Household (pp. 395-415) Elizabeth Foyster. -- (8) Courses in Politeness: The Upbringing and Experiences of Five Teenage Diarists, 1671-1860 (pp. 417-430) Anthony Fletcher. -- (9) The Brash Colonial: Class and Comportment in Nineteenth-Century Australia (pp. 431-453) Penny Russell. -- (10) Gentlemanly Politeness and Manly Simplicity in Victorian England (pp. 455-472) John Tosh
journal  article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  social_history  politeness  status  elites  consumers  education  domesticity  gentleman  manners  moral_reform  moral_philosophy  masculinity  houses  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Harrington - Gender, Commerce, and the Transformation of Virtue in Eighteenth-Century Britain | JSTOR: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Summer, 2001), pp. 33-52
This article examines the shift in views of virtue in eighteenth-century Britain as the emerging middle-class attempted to legitimize commerce and forge a broader concept of citizenship. I illustrate how middle-class values were sanctioned, in part, by relocating the source of civic virtue from the public to the domestic or private sphere. During this transition, women came to be seen as the "civilizing" agents of society, and I demonstrate how this new ethical role prescribed for them was reflected and instantiated in eighteenth-century culture through specific pedagogical practices. By analyzing eighteenth-century conceptions of civic virtue in terms of how they were implicated in specific historical configurations of gender and class, I illustrate the need for further studies that approach ethics as a contingent, unstable category. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  commerce-doux  middle_class  gender  civic_virtue  domesticity  education-women  citizens  political_participation  moral_reform  morality-conventional  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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