dunnettreader + divine_right   17

Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  amazon.com  17thC  British_history  British_politics  legal_history  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  common_law  judiciary  judicial_review  prerogative  Absolutism  divine_right  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  counselors  religion-established  Act_of_Supremacy  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_I-personal_rule  political_discourse  Bacon  Selden  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RICHARD REX -- THE RELIGION OF HENRY VIII (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 1-32. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RICHARD REX - University of Cambridge --This article takes issue with the influential recent interpretation of Henry VIII's religious position as consistently ‘Erasmian’. Bringing to the discussion not only a re-evaluation of much familiar evidence but also a considerable quantity of hitherto unknown or little-known material, it proposes instead that Henry's religious position, until the 1530s, sat squarely within the parameters of ‘traditional religion’ and that the subsequent changes in his attitudes to the cult of the saints, monasticism, and papal primacy were so significant as to be understood and described by Henry himself in terms of a veritable religious ‘conversion’. This conversion, which was very much sui generis, is not easily to be fitted within the confessional frameworks of other sixteenth-century religious movements (though it was by no means unaffected by them). It hinged upon Henry's new understanding of kingship as a supreme spiritual responsibility entrusted to kings by the Word of God, but long hidden from them by the machinations of the papacy. His own providential deliverance from blindness was, he believed, but the beginning of a more general spiritual enlightenment
article  paywall  religious_history  church_history  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Erastianism  religion-established  religious_belief  Church_of_England  divine_right  kingship  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Erasmus  Providence  Absolutism  Tudor  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"LEGITIMATION" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- This article identifies 3 conceptions of legitimation - pre-modern, modern, and post-secular - -- Pre-modern conceptions of legitimation consider governments and rulers legitimate if they are ordained by God or if the political system is ordered in accordance with the normative cosmic order. Contemporary proponents of the pre-modern conception range from those in the US who maintain that the government has been legitimated by the “Judeo-Christian tradition” to those in predominantly Muslim countries like Iran that have constitutional theocracies. -- the prevailing modern conception of legitimation in constitutional democracies stems from the “consent of the governed,” which includes 2 principles of legitimation - democracy (or popular sovereignty) and constitutionalism (or the rule of law). The critical challenges to these principles include the internal challenges of identity politics and religious fundamentalism and the external challenge of globalization. The dramatic return of religion and the surprising rise of political theology are two prominent developments supporting a shift to a post-secular conception of legitimation and a new post-secular social imaginary. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "LEGITIMATION" Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Ed. Michael T. Gibbons, Diana Coole, & Kennan Ferguson. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  legitimacy  authority  divine_right  divine_command  democracy  constitutionalism  consent  social_contract  rule_of_law  post-secular  modernity  secularization  secularism  constitutional_law  government-forms  accountability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Patriarcha, or the Natural Power of Kings - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha; of the Natural Power of Kings. By the Learned Sir Robert Filmer Baronet (London: Richard Chiswell, 1680). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/221> -- In the aftermath of the English Revolution which saw the execution of a king and the creation of a Commonwealth and the restoration of the monarchy, Filmer wrote a solid defense of the divine right of kings which in turn prompted John Locke to write a riposte – part 1 of the Two Treatises of Government. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  monarchy  Absolutism  hierarchy  social_order  family  authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  divine_right  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  English_Civil_War  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  political_press  Tories  High_Church  resistance_theory  Locke-1st_Treatise  Tyrrell  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. A. Prior - Ecclesiology and Political Thought in England, 1580-c. 1630 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 2005), pp. 855-884
This article examines the ways in which debates on ecclesiology in the Church of England served as a venue for the examination of political precept. It argues in particular that polemical sources - whether sermons, pamphlets, or longer works - reveal that discussion of conformity, the nature of the church, and its doctrine and discipline led to a broader examination of law, sovereignty, parliament, and the political costs of religious discord. Underlying the dispute was a fundamental tension over civil and sacred authority, and the relationship between politics - the realm of human custom and history - and doctrine - the realm of the divine and immemorial. The article offers a number of revisions to current discussions of the history of political thought, while pointing to the importance of religious discourse for our understanding of the political tensions that existed in the years prior to the English civil war. -- extensive bibliography across political and religious history and political thought, theology and ecclesiology -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_lit  ecclesiology  Laudian  Calvinist  Puritans  godly_persons  theocracy  Erastianism  political_philosophy  political_press  political_culture  politics-and-religion  divine_right  monarchy  commonwealth  authority  legitimacy  sovereignty  Parliament  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Kaldane: Anti-Trinitarianism and the Republican Tradition in Enlightenment Britain | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Kadane, Matthew. “Anti-Trinitarianism and the Republican Tradition in Enlightenment Britain.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/68.-- In "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Writing in the opening months of the French Revolution and in response to the accusation of anti-monarchical republicanism, Joseph Priestley explained in self-defense that if he was a “unitarian in religion” he remained “a trinitarian in politics” The republican-leaning Priestley was making a subtle distinction, but if the image of a political Trinitarian who held faith in Commons, Lords, and monarch could concisely illustrate what was surprising, if not paradoxical, about the political outlook of a religious Unitarian, it was because the link between republicanism and anti-Trinitarianism was so common.  By the end of the century, in the paranoid 1790s—when, whatever his subtle outlook, “Gunpowder Joe” Priestley could be construed as a Guy Fawkes style terrorist—Edmund Burke helped defeat the Unitarian Relief Bill of 1792 in the Commons by comparing Unitarians to “insect reptiles” that “fill us with disgust” and “if they go above their natural size . . . become objects of the greatest terror.” Given the republican implications in the Glorious Revolution and the century of Enlightenment it helped set in motion, anti-Trinitarianism therefore presents something of a paradox: republicans were drawn to it in great enough numbers to make it an unofficial religious outlook of the republican tradition, but it was explicitly criminalized in the state that was more republican, at least up to 1776, than any other major Atlantic state apart from the Dutch Republic.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  religious_history  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  anti-Trinitarian  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  theology  Church_of_England  dissenters  tolerance  Priestley  Burke  divine_right  monarchy  heterodoxy  Wilkes  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  anti-Jacobin  middle_class  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Spurlock. Review of Prior & Burgess, eds., England's Wars of Religion, Revisited | H-Net Reviews (2013)
Spurlock. Review of Prior, Charles W. A.; Burgess, Glenn, eds., England's Wars of Religion, Revisited The significance of Coffey's paradigm is that it offers a model capable of reconciling Morrill's emphasis on religion and Quentin Skinner's on liberation from servitude, and can also be applied to the other "British revolutions" of 1641, 1688, and 1776. Together, the essays of Coffey, Foxley, Mortimer, and Worden make a solid contribution to enhance the ways that religious ideas shaped notions of liberty and liberation. Jeffrey Collins grants much greater significance to anti-Catholic sentiments and argues for a lasting legacy beyond the Interregnum. He disputes the claims of John Locke and others--all too frequently accepted by historians--that the possibility of tolerating Catholics in Restoration England depended wholly on the distinction between political Romanism and religious Catholicism. McGee shines light on an important reality that for D'Ewes, as well as the vast majority of his fellow English men and women, their world as they understood it did not depend on the actions of men. Instead they interpreted past, present, and future events as dependent on the will of God, and, therefore, their theologies profoundly shaped how they interpreted events.
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july 2013 by dunnettreader

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