dunnettreader + dissenters   40

Quaker bankers: building trust on the basis of sincerity, reciprocity and charity | Magic, Maths & Money - Feb 2016
This post follows discussions of the norms sincerity, reciprocity and charity in financial markets. It suggests that the success of Quaker finance, that funded… Tracks the importance of Quaker-owned banks to the development of UK financial system - the number of big-name banking families with Quaker founders is striking. Their personalized methods of working on reputation (theirs and their borrowers) based on shared standards of probity and transparency, disciplined by membership in the Quaker community - allowed them to not only grow in the loan business, but become big in the bills market. The Quaker method of collecting views re appropriate moral life practices, which were documented and circulated among the members - and set mutual expectations for ethical practices, including areas like bookkeeping and full disclosure. The Quaker firms were central to the system of country banks, capable of providing liquidity to halt bank runs, wind down problem institutions etc. Their bills business didn't survive the switch to the Bank of England becoming lender of last resort in the 1844 crisis. And their information advantages don't seem to have remained a competitive advantage as it had been in the pre Napoleonic_Wars era.
Instapaper  economic_history  financial_innovation  banking  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Quakers  dissenters  Industrial_Revolution  ethics  norms  norms-business  accounting  accountability  reputation  disclosure  information-intermediaries  information-markets  money_market  Bank_of_England  country_banks  financial_crisis  bank_runs  lender-of-last-resort  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
N.H. Keeble - The Restoration: England in the 1660s (2002) | Wiley Online Library
This cultural history challenges the standard depiction of the 1660s as the beginning of a new age of stability, demonstrating that the de following the Restoration was just as complex and exciting as the revolutionary years that preceded it. -- very large endnotes available as free access -- downloaded pdf to Air
books  bibliography  downloaded  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  cultural_history  religious_history  politics-and-religion  English_Civil_War  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  Parliament  dissenters  tolerance  persecution  religion-established  Church_of_England  social_history 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Nicholas McDowell, The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2 (April 2005), pp. 368-369
Reviewed work(s): Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 219. $72.00 (cloth). ISBN 0‐19‐926626‐3. -- The review puts the book in histriographical debates since Christopher Hill and his "world turned upside down" thesis of radicalism originating from below. Milton wasn't unusual as highly educated among committed radical authors. The review shorthands the historiography debates unfortunately - Peter Lake is a star, but what and who he was revising? where was there pushback? Who else beyond Lake and David Cuomo a couple of other names tossed out? Also mentions parallels with Spinoza and confirming Pocock claim Enlightenment parentage via radicals. -- McDowell has a literary history PhD - this is reworked dissertation - so he's great on digging out obscure texts and tracking authorship, but not a wide scope to his background in all the interrelated streams of political, religious etc thought -- Review this again after looking at more of the last 2 decades of historiography for 17thC intellectual_history and political thought.
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  radicals  Commonwealthmen  cultural_history  university  scholastics  education-higher  education-civic  reform-political  reform-social  elite_culture  religious_culture  dissenters  Levellers  political-theology  political_participation  political_press  pamphlets  to_read  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Brooke Palmieri - The Wild, The Innocent, and The Quaker’s Struggles—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix
Although they were notorious for appearing naked in marketplaces, interrupting sermons, and calling for the overthrow of the church, the Quakers were extraordinarily disciplined about running riot. It made sense for the Quakers to cultivate an exaggerated presence in order to make their voices heard among the clamor of other religious sects formed after English Civil War. But what set them apart was the volume of their printed works. During the early years of their establishment in the 1650s, Quakers published about a pamphlet a week, paid for through a collectively managed fund, and distributed by a network of itinerant preachers known as the “Valiant Sixty.” The Sixty, which were in fact more than sixty people, included George Fox, Margaret -- [collective control of publishing] The Meeting format, which had its origins in collective, mystical experiences of trembling and Quaking in fear of the Lord, and which had formed part of the basis for Quaker survival through terrible persecution, also became a forum for collective skills-sharing in reading, writing, and publication. And in turn, a sense of collective education and advocacy. After all, the subject matter taken up by the Quaker press in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries included a number of incredibly progressive issues: pacifism, gender equality, racial equality, and prison reform. The potential futures imagined by a few seventeenth-century hellraisers have underpinned issues of social justice that still matter today, and may have even helped give rise to them. In other words, when Hell Broke Loose, the outcome wasn’t entirely pandemonium.
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  dissenters  publishing  pamphlets  religious_lit  reform-social  reform-legal  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull (1698), ed. Simone Zurbuchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull, ed. and with an introduction by Simone Zurbuchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/887> -- written in response to Revocation of the Edict of Nantes -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Pufendorf  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Edict_of_Nantes  religion-established  civil_society  tolerance  sovereignty  ecclesiology  natural_law  natural_rights  religious_belief  British_politics  1690s  dissenters  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
ANTHONY PAGE - RATIONAL DISSENT, ENLIGHTENMENT, AND ABOLITION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 741-772
Following British abolition of the slave trade in 1807, the origins and nature of popular abolitionism have been much debated among historians. Traditionally, religion was seen as the driving force, with an emphasis on the role of Quakers and evangelicals, whilst in the twentieth century social historians began to stress the importance of economic and social change. This article revises both interpretations by helping to recover and analyse the abolitionism of enlightened Rational Dissenters. Legal inequality and their 'rational piety' encouraged heterodox Dissenters to become active in a wide range of reformist causes. Owing to evangelical dominance in the nineteenth century, however, the role of Rational Dissenters was marginalized in histories of abolitionism. Recovering Rational Dissenting abolitionism underlines the importance of religion in the campaign against the slave trade. Since Rational Dissent was to a large extent a religion of the commercial classes, this article also sheds light on the hotly debated relationship between capitalism and abolition. -- extensive bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge journals -- a return to Clark's view of radical dissent as revolutionary force in Ancien Regime Britain
article  jstor  paywall  historians-and-religion  revisionism  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  dissenters  Radical_Enlightenment  Price_Richard  Priestley  abolition  radicals  reform-political  reform-social  merchants  capitalism  middle_class  ClarkJonathan  Evangelical  conservatism  counter-revolution  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dewey D. Wallace, Jr., historiographical review - Via Media? A Paradigm Shift | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2003), pp. 2-21
Very useful - he was working in the same stream as Tyacke before publication of Anti-Calvinists. Follows subsequent work that's developed the approach of the Elizabethan church as Reformed with a hankering for bits of Kutheranism. Notes the parallels in tensions between established Erastian church and the hotter sort who wanted to push a second Reformation, following the Reformed scholasticim and the more extreme version of Calvinism post Calvin. Notes different versions of where the via media develooed (the anti Puritan divines connected with James I court, the Oxford Movement? ) - Wallace seems to think it's a Restoration phenomenon, when Hooker is "canonized", and later groups like the Oxford Movement reinforced the claim that the Church of England had pursued the via media, at least by Elizabeth, as a means of marginalizing the evangelical stream. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  religious_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  Reformation  Church_of_England  Calvinist  Lutherans  Arminian  via_media  Laudian  Elizabeth  clergy  godly_persons  Puritans  predestination  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  parish  local_politics  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  anti-Catholic  popery  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Hudson - "Britons Never Will be Slaves": National Myth, Conservatism, and the Beginnings of British Antislavery | Eighteenth-Century Studies 34.4 (2001) 559-576 - Project MUSE
According to a virtual consensus in modern scholarship on the abolition of slavery, this event marked a historic victory for nonconformist, radical, or otherwise antiestablishment elements in British culture. A recent historian has connected the rise of antislavery with "Wilkite" tendencies in the British middle class, and others have located abolitionism in a "reform complex" devoted to the radical overhaul of the British political system. It has been widely assumed that British slavery was generally excused by the established Anglican church and that the abolitionist movement was dominated by "Quakers, evangelicals and Rational Dissenters." -- This scholarship exemplifies a "Whig" historiography that routinely looks for the sources of social change in the attack of peripheral or nontraditional groups on the center. -- the most resonant voices against slavery during the 18thC belonged to men and women with strong backgrounds in the Anglican Church and conservative views on social and political issues in Britain. These include Samuel Johnson, William Warburton, Edmund Burke, ... -- we find that these humanitarian objections emerged from within the groups and ideologies that conceived of Britain as fundamentally Anglican, royal, and hierarchical. -- it is, in fact, inaccurate to identify mainstream British values with the merchants and colonists who controlled the slave-trade. As I will contend, antislavery took shape amidst an essentially ideological conflict about the very nature of "Britain" between proponents of unbridled free-market capitalism and the essentially conservative and traditionalist outlook of those who wished to contain capitalism within the constraints of morality, religion, and their patriotic image of Britons as a freedom-loving people. -- copy 1st 2 pages in Simple Note
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew C. Thompson - Popery, Politics, and Private Judgement in Early Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Jun., 2002), pp. 333-356
This article analyses two dissenting periodicals, the "Occasional Paper" and the "Old Whig". It argues that these periodicals provide an opportunity to reconsider the current priorities in the historiography of eighteenth-century political thought and religious history. Having considered the contexts from which the periodicals emerged and the importance of a perceived growth in catholic proselytizing in the 1730s, it analyses the importance of 'popery' in religious and political discourse. Taken together, popery and private judgement provided the parameters to descibe what was termed 'consistent protestantism' and this was used to defend a particular version of dissent. The protestant aspect to oppositional whiggery has been largely ignored, particularly by those keen to assert the centrality of 'classical republicanism' to opposition language in the early Hanoverian period. This article suggests an alternative account of the transmission of the commonwealth tradition and indicates further lines of inquiry into the evolution of whig ideas. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  historiography  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  religious_history  political_philosophy  commonwealth  Whigs-opposition  anti-Catholic  Absolutism  political_press  political_culture  republicanism  dissenters  Church_of_England  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC and Introduction, Nicholas Rogers - Making the English Middle Class, ca. 1700-1850 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4, Oct., 1993
Introduction (pp. 299-304) Nicholas Rogers [downloaded] *--* (1) "A Just and Profitable Commerce": Moral Economy and the Middle Classes in 18thC London (pp. 305-332) Susan E. Brown [questions "aristocratic century" - independent merchants and bourgeoisie in leading charities, urban politics, polite culture etc. Didn't fit a consistent deference pattern; members of middle class could be on all sides of Poor Laws, so Thompson's bipolar moral economy overstates lack of variation in middle and intermediary functions, especially when drawing on civic traditions that didn't depend on aristocracy leadership] *--* (2) Racism, Imperialism, and the Traveler's Gaze in 18thC England (pp. 333-357) Margaret Hunt [unenlightened middle class elements eg freemasonry could be as xenophobic as cosmopolitan; attention to racial, ethnic difference could also be used to stigmatise the poor and set middle class apart] *--* (3) The Masonic Moment; Or, Ritual, Replica, and Credit: John Wilkes, the Macaroni Parson, and the Making of the Middle-Class Mind (pp. 358-395) John Money. *--* (4) "Middle-Class" Domesticity Goes Public: Gender, Class, and Politics from Queen Caroline to Queen Victoria (pp. 396-432) Dror Wahrman [middle class as defenders of family, domesticity, separate spheres only after won political status in 1832 - nobody adopted Hannah More's vision until decades later - use of the term by others or as self identifier is all over the map, even in the same report or work, stabilizing only c 1830s] -- downloaded Rogers pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  urbanization  urban_politics  urban_elites  middle_class  aristocracy  politeness  consumerism  travel  xenophobia  racism  poverty  Poor_Laws  merchants  mercantilism  commercial_interest  interest_groups  corporatism  free_trade  Freemasonry  gender  family  domesticity  moral_economy  creditors  debtors  dissenters  local_government  political_nation  oligarchy  Parliament  anti-Jacobin  Loyalists  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  imperialism  London  status  rank  nouveaux_riches  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Peter Harrison - Science and Dissent in England, 1688-1945, ed. Paul Wood | JSTOR: Minerva, Vol. 44, No. 2 (June 2006), pp. 223-227
Looks at extended Merton thesis - that elements of nonconformist theology and social practices were a congenial environment for innovation beyond the limited issue of the connections between Puritans and the Scientific Revolution. No clear answer though some of the studies in the book fit the thesis fairly well. Larry Stewart and another chapter deal with Dussenters in London in public science and coffeehouse philosophy. Their exclusion from the universities was a factor, both in encouraging groups engaged in experimental_philosophy in the city and in anxiety about the potentially volatile mix of religious nonconformity, political radicalism and intellectual innovation. -- didn't download
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january 2014 by dunnettreader
Bruce Yardley - George Villiers, Second Duke of Buckingham, and the Politics of Toleration | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Spring, 1992), pp. 317-337
Though Buckingham wasn't an active persecutor of dissenters, his reputation for support of toleration undeserved. It shows up only in 2 periods when making alliances with radicals was politically useful. Not really a politique, more an opportunist? -- useful bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  politics-and-religion  17thC  British_politics  Restoration  court_culture  political_culture  tolerance  persecution  Whigs  dissenters  Exclusion_Crisis  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sharon Achinstein - Milton's Spectre in the Restoration: Marvell, Dryden, and Literary Enthusiasm JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 1 (1996), pp. 1-29
Censorship and threats of assassination, book burnings etc - not just after Restoration but well into 1670s. Marvell Rehearsal Transpos'd and other writings that were pro toleration treated as necessarily expressing republicanism and commonwealth sentiments if not fully pro regicide. -- a sense of what Bolingbroke's great grandfather going through -- figures associated with Cromwell, excluded in pardon but not tried for treason -- didn't download
article  jstor  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  persecution  tolerance  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  poetry  form-poetic  Milton  Marvell  Dryden  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Will R. Jordan - Religion in the Public Square: A Reconsideration of David Hume and Religious Establishment | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 687-713
While recent scholarship has attempted to clarify the Founders' opposition to religious establishment, few pause to consider public establishment as a viable alternative. This study examines one of the eighteenth century's least likely proponents of religious establishment: David Hume. Despite his reputation as an avowed enemy of religion, Hume actually defends religion for its ability to strengthen society and to improve morality. These salutary qualities are lost, however, when society is indifferent about the character of the religion professed by its citizens. Hume's masterful "History of England" reveals that a tolerant established church is best equipped to reap the advantages of religion while avoiding the dangers of fanaticism. Hume's differences in this respect from Adam Smith and Alexis de Tocqueville are explored. -- Hume not all that unique among sceptical philosophes in thinking that a moderate established religion - that didn't run around actively persecuting dissent - would be socially and politically salutary if not necessary
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  political_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  Hume-ethics  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  dissenters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Yannick Deschamps- Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century (2013) - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE - Yannick Deschamps. "Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century."Eighteenth-Century Studies 46.3 (2013): 349-361
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  18thC  1700s  Harley  Defoe  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-religion  dissenters  Parliament  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Mark Goldie - Subjects and Sovereigns: The Grand Controversy over Legal Sovereignty in Stuart England by C. C. Weston; J. R. Greenberg (1983)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 26, No. 4 (Dec., 1983), pp. 1029-1030 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- nice little essay on what goes wrong when try to map Left-Right assumptions re political theory since antiquity onto 17thC English religious politics -- the players in fact don't wind up where the authors put them, ignoring the discrepancies
books  reviews  political_history  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  dissenters  Whigs  Tories  Absolutism  tolerance  political_culture  religious_culture  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Parliament  sovereignty  Locke  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Marvell  Erastianism  ecclesiology  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: N. H. Keeble - Rewriting the Restoration (1992)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Mar., 1992), pp. 223-225 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Politics of Religion in Restoration England, eds.Tim Harris; Paul Seaward; Mark Goldie;  --**-- Enemies under His Feet: Radicals and Nonconformists in Britain, 1664-1677 by Richard L. Greaves
books  reviews  jstor  political_history  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  Britain  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  James_II  Church_of_England  dissenters  Whigs  Tories  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: Dan Beaver - Religion, Politics, and Society in Early Modern England: A Problem of Classification (1994)
JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Jul., 1994), pp. 314-322 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Politics of Religion in Restoration England by Tim Harris; Paul Seaward; Mark Goldie; --**-- The Family in the English Revolution by Christopher Durston;  --**-- Death, Ritual, and Bereavement by Ralph Houlbrooke;  --**-- Sin and Society in the Seventeenth Century by John Addy
books  reviews  historiography  religious_history  political_history  church_history  social_history  political_culture  cultural_history  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Church_of_England  dissenters  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  family  population  local_government  provinces  reformation_of_manners  sin  judiciary  Puritans  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: Mark Goldie - Voluntary Anglicans (2003)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2003), pp. 977-990 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- Restoration, Reformation, and Reform, 1660-1828: Archbishops of Canterbury and Their Diocese by Jeremy Gregory; --**--  The Church in an Age of Danger: Parsons and Parishioners, 1660-1740 by Donald A. Spaeth; --**--  The Quakers in English Society, 1655-1725 by Adrian Davies;  --**-- Hawksmoor's London Churches: Architecture and Theology by Pierre de la Ruffinière du Prey;  --**-- The National Church in Local Perspective: The Church of England and the Regions, 1660-1800 ed by Jeremy Gregory & Jeffrey S. Chamberlain
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september 2013 by dunnettreader
George Hoffmann, Atheism as a Devotional Category | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Hoffmann, George. “Atheism as a Devotional Category.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 2 (April 3, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/55. -- in "Experiment and Experience" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Occurrences of “atheist” spread quickly during the Reformation conflicts, riding on top of struggles that reshaped what it meant to believe. .... The division of Christianity into discrete confessions, abutting or overlapping one another, meant that post-Reformation creeds could no longer merely depend on social conformity to guarantee religious discipline. In communities riven between competing creeds, making a commitment to one’s faith came to entail something more deliberate than tacit consent, something more purposeful than weaving a web of local loyalties. Confessional formalization transformed the nature of religious affiliation from unspecified and potentially unreflective to explicit and volitional.Within such a climate, the hypothetical absence of faith allowed believers to construe their own devotion as an intentional act, such that their faith might appear a willful “choice.” Atheism allowed followers to view themselves as electing their faith, however coercive their adhesion in fact proved—in fact, countervailing evidence suggested increased pressures toward religious conformity: new social structures arose, prayer books multiplied, churches were remodeled, and everywhere missals, catechisms, and printed professions of faith sought to mold the content of belief.This antagonistic climate of confessional competition depended upon the theoretical option of atheism in order to make such coercion feel consensual.
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  Reformation  confessionalization  atheism  dissenters  heterodoxy  16thC  17thC  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Matthew Kaldane: Anti-Trinitarianism and the Republican Tradition in Enlightenment Britain | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Kadane, Matthew. “Anti-Trinitarianism and the Republican Tradition in Enlightenment Britain.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/68.-- In "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Writing in the opening months of the French Revolution and in response to the accusation of anti-monarchical republicanism, Joseph Priestley explained in self-defense that if he was a “unitarian in religion” he remained “a trinitarian in politics” The republican-leaning Priestley was making a subtle distinction, but if the image of a political Trinitarian who held faith in Commons, Lords, and monarch could concisely illustrate what was surprising, if not paradoxical, about the political outlook of a religious Unitarian, it was because the link between republicanism and anti-Trinitarianism was so common.  By the end of the century, in the paranoid 1790s—when, whatever his subtle outlook, “Gunpowder Joe” Priestley could be construed as a Guy Fawkes style terrorist—Edmund Burke helped defeat the Unitarian Relief Bill of 1792 in the Commons by comparing Unitarians to “insect reptiles” that “fill us with disgust” and “if they go above their natural size . . . become objects of the greatest terror.” Given the republican implications in the Glorious Revolution and the century of Enlightenment it helped set in motion, anti-Trinitarianism therefore presents something of a paradox: republicans were drawn to it in great enough numbers to make it an unofficial religious outlook of the republican tradition, but it was explicitly criminalized in the state that was more republican, at least up to 1776, than any other major Atlantic state apart from the Dutch Republic.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  religious_history  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  anti-Trinitarian  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  theology  Church_of_England  dissenters  tolerance  Priestley  Burke  divine_right  monarchy  heterodoxy  Wilkes  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  anti-Jacobin  middle_class  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jess Edwards, Review: Aino Mäkikalli and Andreas K. E. Mueller eds, Positioning Defoe’s Non-Fiction: Form, Function, Genre | Digital Defoe
What most previous studies of Defoe’s non-fiction have tended not to do, and this includes the editorial introductions to the Pickering and Chatto editions, according to John Richetti, is pay attention to the formal properties of these works in their own right, as products of generic pressures and literary craft (Richetti 38). In their explorations of various kinds of moral challenge and crisis, their attempts to represent the particularities of time and space, and their occasional dramatic dialogues, Defoe’s non-fictional works help us to understand the genesis of his groundbreaking experiments in realist narrative, as well as some of their peculiarities. They also provide us, in their own right, with an opportunity to explore the relationship between history and form. Mäkikalli and Mueller’s collection, Positioning Daniel Defoe’s Non-Fiction, addresses this gap in scholarship.
books  reviews  18thC  English_lit  non-fiction  Defoe  rhetoric  satire  travel  London  1700s  1707_Union  British_history  Scotland  dissenters  conduct  cultural_history  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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