dunnettreader + dignity   14

Leo XIII - Rerum Novarum - ENCYCLICAL ON CAPITAL AND LABOR (1892) | Vatican
Rights and Duties of Capital and Labor -- That the spirit of revolutionary change, which has long been disturbing the nations of the world, should have passed beyond the sphere of politics and made its influence felt in the cognate sphere of practical economics is not surprising. The elements of the conflict now raging are unmistakable, in the vast expansion of industrial pursuits and the marvellous discoveries of science; in the changed relations between masters and workmen; in the enormous fortunes of some few individuals, and the utter poverty of the masses; the increased self reliance and closer mutual combination of the working classes; as also, finally, in the prevailing moral degeneracy. The momentous gravity of the state of things now obtaining fills every mind with painful apprehension; wise men are discussing it; practical men are proposing schemes; popular meetings, legislatures, and rulers of nations are all busied with it - actually there is no question which has taken deeper hold on the public mind. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  economic_history  19thC  capitalism  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  labor  labor_history  labor_standards  human_rights  dignity  poverty  political_economy  religious_culture  Catholics  Papacy  social_theory  social_thought  social_problem  social_gospel  working_class  laisser-faire  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Francis - Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013) - ENCYCLICAL LETTER ON FAITH | Vatican
Thanks to faith we have come to understand the unique dignity of each person, something which was not clearly seen in antiquity. In the second century the pagan Celsus reproached Christians for an idea that he considered foolishness and delusion: namely, that God created the world for man, setting human beings at the pinnacle of the entire cosmos. "Why claim that [grass] grows for the benefit of man, rather than for that of the most savage of the brute beasts?"[46] "If we look down to Earth from the heights of heaven, would there really be any difference between our activities and those of the ants and bees?"[47] At the heart of biblical faith is God’s love, his concrete concern for every person, and his plan of salvation which embraces all of humanity and all creation, culminating in the incarnation, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Without insight into these realities, there is no criterion for discerning what makes human life precious and unique. Man loses his place in the universe, he is cast adrift in nature, either renouncing his proper moral responsibility or else presuming to be a sort of absolute judge, endowed with an unlimited power to manipulate the world around him.
religious_history  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  faith  revelation  reason  religious_belief  Biblical_exegesis  church_history  Early_Christian  Old_Testament  New_Testament  Augustine  human_rights  human_nature  creation  soteriology  dignity  imago_dei  nature  nature-mastery  modernity  environment  social_thought  poverty  religious_experience  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Ronald Osborn - The Great Subversion: The Scandalous Origins of Human Rights | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Hopgood’s bracing critique of rights talk and his call for a less lofty, more pragmatic dispensation forces us to face the implications of the loss of theological anthropology for concepts of human equality and dignity. Can we have a rationally coherent, morally compelling, and historically sustainable discourse as well as a practice of humanistic values and human rights absent a “thick” metaphysical or religious framework, such as the one provided in the Western tradition for some two millennia by Judeo-Christian sources? Put another way, the question “Can we be good without God?” does not strike nearly deep enough. The urgent question is: Will we still be good to the stranger in our midst, or good in the same ways, once we have fully grasped the contestable character of humanism and once we have utterly abandoned the essentially religious idea that every person is made, in the enigmatic language of Scripture, in the image of God? It is a question that even committed atheists, for the sake of good atheism, should find worthy of consideration. -- balance behind paywall
books  reviews  human_rights  theodicy  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  morality-divine_command  philosophical_anthropology  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  imago_dei  recognition  dignity  equality  foundationalism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - What do the Philosophers Have against Dignity? (Nov 2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-59 -- Among analytic philosophers, there is considerable antipathy towards the concept of human dignity. It is not always expressed, but the impression is conveyed that this is a rather disreputable idea and that its trumpeting in legal and political theory is to be deplored. The present paper tries to get to grips with the sources of this antipathy. Is it based on the unclarity of the concept, its religious overtones, its speciesism, or its redundancy as a moral idea. The paper makes a case for dignity as a status-concept -- denoting a particular sort of moral/legal status that all humans have. -- Pages in PDF File: 23 -- Keywords: definition, dignity, foundationalism, human dignity, religion, rights -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  dignity  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  status  human_rights  foundationalism  politics-and-religion  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Citizenship and Dignity (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-74 -- Theories of dignity have to navigate between two conceptions: the egalitarian idea of human dignity and the old idea of dignitas, connected with hierarchy, rank, and office. One possible way of bridging the gap between the two is to talk of the dignity of the citizen. In modern republics and democracies, the dignity of the citizen extends to a large sector of the population and connotes something about the general quality of the relation between the government and the governed. This chapter first explores Immanuel Kant’s account of the dignity of the citizen, and then it pursues the implications of the dignity of the citizen for modern society and modern theories of human dignity. Though the dignity of the citizen and human dignity are not the same concept, they are congruent in many respects and the former casts considerable light on the latter — in particular on the connection between dignity and responsibility and dignity and transparency in social and political relations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: citizenship, contractarianism, dignity, human dignity, Kant, responsibilities, transparency -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  Enlightenment  modernity  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  citizenship  citizens  dignity  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  rank  social_order  social_contract  responsibility  office  commonwealth  common_good  fiduciaries  accountability  governing_class  transparency  inequality  political_participation  political_nation  political_economy  political_culture  governmentality  power-asymmetric  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Mika LaVaque-Manty - Dueling for Equality: Masculine Honor and the Modern Politics of Dignity | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 34, No. 6 (Dec., 2006), pp. 715-740
This essay argues that aristocratic values and social practices were deployed in the transition to modernity, where equal dignity replaced positional honor as the ground on which an individual's political status rests. The essay focuses on dueling, one of the most important practices for the maintenance of aristocratic honor, at the moments of transition, primarily in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The author argues that the practice has resources for an egalitarian refashioning. This is because it is a system for the distribution of respect and because it involves social equals. At the same time, it is necessarily masculine, which limits the degree to which it can realize equality. The essay argues that the egalitarian refashioning emerged in part out of eighteenth-century thinkers' own reinterpretation of the practice. The focal theorist in the essay is Immanuel Kant, whose discussion allows us to weave together theoretical discussions of honor with the social practices of dueling. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_culture  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  aristocracy  rank  status  honor  honnête  equality  dignity  recognition  citizens  Kant  cultural_change  modernity  duels  masculinity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Kari Saastamoinen - Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem (2010)
Project MUSE - Kari Saastamoinen. "Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem."Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 39-62. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>. ?...Downloaded pdf to Note - also available in html. ?... It is often maintained that Samuel Pufendorf founded natural equality on human dignity. This article partly questions this interpretation, maintaining that the dignity Pufendorf attributed to human nature did not indicate the Kantian idea of absolute and incomparable worth but only superiority in relation to other animals. This comparative dignity of humanity implied that all humans are equally obliged to obey natural law, but it did not offer a foundation for the similarity of their innate duties. The latter followed from the fundamental principle of natural law, the duty to maintain sociality, and from observations concerning human self-esteem.

?.... useful links to discussion of other 17thC and 18thC authors as well as centrality of Cicero in working through modern version of rights and duties.
article  Project_MUSE  antiquity  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  equality  obligation  Cicero  Pufendorf  Locke  sociability  self-love  emulation  dignity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Remy Debes review: Jeremy Waldron, Dignity, Rank, and Rights (2013, rev'd 2009 Tanner Lectures and commentaries by Michael Rosen, Don Herzog, and Wai Chee Dimock) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
This book, which contains the revised version of his 2009 Berkeley Tanner Lectures, followed by commentaries from Michael Rosen, Don Herzog, and Wai Chee Dimock, succinctly maps crucial new conceptual space, which no one working on human dignity can ignore. Waldron's central claim is that the principle of human dignity, in its juridical meaning in the modern liberal state, should not be understood in moral terms. In particular, it should not be interpreted as a doctrine about the inherent worth of persons, à la Kant, disconnected from all older connotations of social merit and rank. On the contrary, Waldron argues that within the law the principle of dignity is best understood as the assignment of all persons to a very high social rank, in some sense directly continuous with aristocratic notions of dignity once reserved for Lord and Lady. See also discussion of Stephen Darwall's 2 kinds of respect which Waldron doesn't deal with adequately.
books  reviews  metaethics  human_rights  legal_system  EF-add  Kant-ethics  dignity  civil_liberties  civility-political  recognition  respect  status  rank  hierarchy  legal_theory  equality 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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