dunnettreader + correspondence   9

The Papers of John Jay | Columbia Digital Library Collections
The Papers of John Jay is an image database and indexing tool comprising some 13,000 documents (more than 30,000 page images) scanned chiefly from photocopies of original documents. Most of the source material was assembled by Columbia University's John Jay publication project staff during the 1960s and 1970s under the direction of the late Professor Richard B. Morris. These photocopies were originally intended to be used as source texts for documents to be included in a planned four-volume letterpress series entitled The Selected Unpublished Papers of John Jay, of which only two volumes were published.

In 2005, the new, seven-volume letterpress and online edition of The Selected Papers of John Jay was launched under the direction of Dr. Elizabeth M. Nuxoll and is being published by the University of Virginia Press as part of its Rotunda American Founding Era Collection. The new Selected Papers project not only uses the online Jay material available on this website as source texts, but also provides links from document transcriptions in the letterpress and digital editions to the scanned page images posted here.
website  US_history  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  correspondence  Founders  Jay_John  manuscripts  papers-collected  libraries  digital_humanities 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Cornelia Wilde - Seraphic Companions: The Friendship between Elizabeth Gauden and Simon Patrick | Early Modern Literary Studies (2014
Special Issue 22: Communities and Companionship in Early Modern Literature and Culture (2014) -- This essay explores the friendship between Simon Patrick, future bishop of Ely, and Elizabeth Gauden, one of his parishioners, as an example of Neo-Platonic, chaste, yet impassioned friendship, between the sexes: Based on a combination of Neo-Platonic metaphysics of love, Aristotelian notions of philia, and legitimised by the ideal of Christian charity, the friendship’s spiritual aim is the two ‘soul mates’’ mutual intellectual and emotional refinement in order to be united with the heavenly community and the divine. The ideal of their seraphic companionship is to be achieved through the every-day practice of their friendship, that is, in their actual meetings and through their correspondence (Cambridge University Library Add. MS 19). Patrick and Gauden act as friends by discussing questions of theological and philosophical import, by advising each other on matters spiritual and mundane, and by sharing in social and devotional practices. Through Patrick, the two friends are connected to a ‘this-worldly’ intellectual and religious community the philosophical and theological origins of which can be located within the most important school of 17thC Platonic philosophy, Cambridge Platonism. Patrick, too, counts as a Cambridge Platonists, whose theological views and emphasis on matters of practical divinity characterise him as a prominent figure of post-Restoration liberal Anglicanism. Patrick and Gauden are a virtually unknown example of the 17thC trend for intellectual friendships between men and women as Ruth Perry has identified it (1985). The friendship is presented as a form of sociability that offered women a dynamic role within the learned community and furthered their active religious participation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  religious_culture  17thC  Church_of_England  Restoration  Cambridge_Platonists  Patrick_Simon  correspondence  friendship  women-intellectuals  gender-and-religion  gender_relations  sociability  devotional_practices  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lockean Empathy | Colin Marshall - Academia.edu - forthcoming, Southern Journal of Philosophy
This paper offers an epistemic defense of empathy, drawing on John Locke’s theory of ideas. Locke held that ideas of shape, unlike ideas of color, had a distinctive value: resembling qualities in their objects. I argue that the same is true of empathy, as when someone is pained by someone’s pain. This means that empathy has the same epistemic value or objectivity that Locke and other early modern philosophers assigned to veridical perceptions of shape. For this to hold, pain and pleasure must be a primary quality of the mind, just as shape is a primary quality of bodies. Though Locke did not make that claim, I argue that pain and pleasure satisfy his criteria for primary qualities. I consider several objections to the analogy between empathy and shape-perception, and show how Locke’s theory has resources for answering them. In addition, the claim that empathetic ideas are object-matching sidesteps Berkeley’s influential objection to Locke’s theory of resemblance. I conclude by briefly considering the prospects for a similar defense of empathy in contemporary terms.-- Philosophy of perception, John Locke, Empathy (Philosophy), and Empathy -- bookmark but didn't download
article  Academia.edu  Locke  primary_qualities  epistemology  mind-theory_of  perception  empathy  correspondence  Berkeley  pain  pleasure  cognition 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Electronic Literature as Cultural Heritage (Confessions of an Incunk) | Matthew G. Kirschenbaum - April 2013
This is the text of a talk I gave on April 5, 2013 on the plenary panel at the Electronic Literature Showcase at the Library of Congress, curated by Kathi Inman Berens and Dene Grigar. -- I come before you today, unapologetically, as an Incunk, that is one who has assumed archival and curatorial stewardship over the two electronic literature collections at my university (both, happily, from writers who are still among us, one of whom is even amongst us in this room today). In my remarks I want to candidly consider some of what is at stake in these transitions and transactions, as electronic literature passes from outsider practice to cultural heritage as sanctioned by its passage from private hands to an increasing number of major collecting institutions. [At U of Maryland] -- fascinating re different approaches to emulation, migrating, control of access to limited materials, limited locations etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
literary_history  authors  cultural_history  correspondence  private_papers  digital_humanities  libraries  archives  technology  software  computers  hardware  IP  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
The Correspondence of George Berkeley, ed Mark Hight (2012) :: Early modern philosophy :: Cambridge University Press
George Berkeley (1685–1753), Bishop of Cloyne, was an Irish philosopher and divine who pursued a number of grand causes, contributing to the fields of economics, mathematics, political theory and theology. He pioneered the theory of 'immaterialism', and his work ranges over many philosophical issues that remain of interest today. This volume offers a complete and accurate edition of Berkeley's extant correspondence, including letters both written by him and to him, supplemented by extensive explanatory and critical notes. Alexander Pope famously said 'To Berkeley every virtue under heaven', and a careful reading of the letters reveals a figure worthy of admiration, sheds new light on his personal and intellectual life and provides insight into the broad historical and philosophical currents of his time. The volume will be an invaluable resource for philosophers, modern historians and those interested in Anglo-Irish culture. --

** Gives a complete compilation of the extant correspondence of Berkeley, including letters both written by him and to him
** Includes a full introduction, a biographical sketch of Berkeley, a chronology of publications and extensive explanatory and critical notes
** Provides readers with an invaluable resource to form a picture of this key figure of Anglo-Irish culture
books  18thC  British_history  Ireland  intellectual_history  church_history  Church_of_England  Anglican  philosophy  epistemology  empiricism  theology  Berkeley  correspondence  Pope  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Meredith Hindley - Mapping the Republic of Letters | Humanities Nov 2013
Long article on Dan Edelstein and Paula Findlen mapping the Republic of Letters project - working first with Electronic Enlightenment Voltaire correspondence, extended with other European correspondence and itinrrary information on individuals who traveled, now adding Ben Franklin trove.

As news started to trickle out about what the Mapping the Republic of Letters project was up to, other scholars clamored to use the tools. Unfortunately, those requests had to be turned down because the tools were still prototypes—bare bones with no instructions and no Coleman at hand to fix any glitches that arose. With the help of an NEH Digital Humanities Implementation Grant, the project began work this fall on an open source web application that will allow historians and other humanists to apply visualization techniques to datasets. The application, named Athanasius, will debut in 2015.

Re Voltaire network -- Oe of the dominant narratives of the Enlightenment posits a direct line connecting John Locke to the Glorious Revolution to the advent of liberty and freedom of expression in England, which is then transferred to France, where Voltaire and others run with it. Scholars frequently portray Voltaire as having a special connection to England and are fond of highlighting Voltaire’s letters to Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. The map, however, showed only a tiny number of letters between France and England. At first, Edelstein thought it might be a data problem, but when he used “Ink” to drill down into the nationalities of Voltaire’s correspondents, he found few Englishmen. Voltaire’s primary English correspondents are Sir Everard Fawkener, a silk merchant he met before his London exile, and George Keate, an English poet he met in Rome and Geneva. As for Swift and Pope, you can count those letters on one hand.

Looking for an answer, Edelstein went back to Voltaire’s writings. “It’s right there in front of us. Voltaire is pretty clear that after the death of Newton nothing interesting is happening in England.” The England problem was a clear example of the map and visualizations serving a discovery function. It’s inspired Edelstein to rethink the place of English thought in Voltaire's work. -- BUT NOT a surprise - nothing new intellectually in England -- Scotland took over. England remained important for Voltaire for politics and publishing but not source of new ideas - his French colleagues were all Lockeans & Cartesian vs Newtonian happening in France.
Bolingbroke  Voltaire  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  correspondence  digital_humanities  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Locke  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Bianca Chen: Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Chen, Bianca. “Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/36. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Gisbert Cuper’s career and his rise to fame allow us to examine the working practices of the Republic of Letters and reconsider how to judge a scholar’s merits in a historical context other than our own. First appointed professor of history and rhetoric at a provincial Athenaeum in Deventer (1668), Cuper subsequently became Rector of the institute (1672), burgomaster (mayor) of the city (1674), a delegate of the city to the meetings of the provincial States (the States of Overijssel), a delegate of the province to the States General of the Dutch Republic (1681-1694) and finally, for that highest governing body, a commissioner in the field during the War of the Spanish Succession (1706)...... This article will examine how the concurrence of politics and letters was important for the advancement of scholarship and how it led to the perception of Cuper as a particularly significant cultural intermediary in the Republic of Letters. I will refer to the concept of social capital to emphasize the importance of networks of patronage and the exchange of services within any community, including within the Republic of Letters. Explicitly stressing the value of correspondence to the Republic of Letters in general and to Cuper in particular, I will pay special attention to his large and diverse network of correspondents from different backgrounds. Ultimately this article seeks to demonstrate how successfully Cuper bridged the world of politics and letters by employing his social capital for the sake of learning and the subsequent benefits for his reputation in the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  intelligentsia  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  social_capital  networks  patronage  correspondence  diplomacy  diplomats  politicians  status  antiquaries  Dutch  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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