dunnettreader + consumers   36

David Millon - The Single Constituency Argument in the Economic Analysis of Business Law :: SSRN - Jan 2007
David Millon, Washington and Lee University - School of Law -- Research in Law and Economics, 2007 -- Washington & Lee Legal Studies Paper No. 2007-01 -- The essay points out an interesting parallel in law-and-economics business law scholarship. Working largely independently of each other, economically oriented scholars working in different areas have argued that the law should focus on the interests of a single constituency - shareholders in corporate law, creditors in bankruptcy law, and consumers in antitrust law. Economic analysts thus have rejected arguments advanced by progressive scholars working in each of these areas that the law should instead concern itself with the full range of constituencies affected by business activity. The law-and-economics single constituency claim rests in part on skepticism about judicial competence but the underlying objection is to the use of law for redistributive purposes. The primary value is efficiency, defined in terms of market-generated outcomes. In this essay, I question this political commitment, suggesting that it implies a strong tendency toward maintenance of the existing distribution of wealth. Even more importantly, the single constituency claim may actually have redistributive implications. In each of these areas of business law, however, it is a regressive program that favors owners of capital against those who are generally less well of, such as workers and small business owners. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 31 -- saved to briefcase
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  political_philosophy  political_economy  law-and-economics  conflict_of_interest  principal-agent  profit_maximization  incentives  incentives-distortions  efficiency  shareholder_value  creditors  consumers  consumer_protection  competition  status_quo_bias  capital  inequality-wealth  inequality-opportunity  power-asymmetric  capital_as_power  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  corporate_governance  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  bankruptcy  antitrust  conservative_legal_challenges 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard N. Langlois - Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth - January 2000 :: SSRN
University of Connecticut - Department of Economics -- working paper for Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Vol. 11, No. 1. http://ssrn.com/abstract=257785 -- Abstract of article: In neoclassical theory, knowledge generates increasing returns-and therefore growth-because it is a public good that can be costlessly reused once created. In fact, however, much knowledge in the economy is actually tacit and not easily transmitted-and thus not an obvious source of increasing returns. Several writers have responded to this alarming circumstances by affirming hopefully that knowledge today is increasingly codified, general, and abstract-and increasingly less tacit. This paper disputes such a trend. But all is not lost: for knowledge does not have to be codified to be reused and therefore to generate economic growth. -- Abstract of paper adds -- This essay takes a skeptical view of the proposition that we are experiencing greater codification hand in hand with modern technology and economic growth. ... [and] an equally skeptical view ...that only codified knowledge, and never tacit knowledge, can generate economic growth. Knowledge can be externalized and made less idiosyncratic in ways that do not necessarily involve codification. Knowledge is structure. And knowledge can be externalized beyond an individual creator by being imbedded either in machines and other physical technology or in various kinds of social or behavioral structures that I will broadly call institutions. Using a wonderful 1912 essay by Wesley Clair Mitchell as a starting point, I examine, as a kind of case study, the way in which knowledge is embedded and shared in consumption -- an important and neglected aspect of the process of economic growth. -- Pages in PDF 38 -- Keywords: Tacit knowledge, Increasing returns, Growth theory, Knowledge reuse, Codification -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  institutions  institutional_economics  firms-theory  firms-structure  knowledge  knowledge_economy  know-how  public_goods  epistemology-social  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  economic_growth  economic_sociology  Innovation  increasing_returns  bibliography  consumption  consumers  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Walton, « Politics and Economies of Reputation », | Books and Ideas - La Vie des Idèes, 30 October 2014
Reviewed: (1) Jean-Luc Chappey, Ordres et désordres biographiques: Dictionnaires, listes de noms, réputation des Lumières à Wikipédia, Seyssel: Champ Vallon, 2013. (2) Clare Haru Crowston, Credit, Fashion, Sex: Economies of Regard in Old Régime France, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013. -- Historians of 18thC France have become increasingly interested in the ‘individual’. Inspired by the conceptual framework of such theorists as Foucault and Bourdieu, research on identity, self-fashioning and reputation has in recent years become bound up with the study of historical processes (social mobility, rising consumption, public opinion) that reveal a historically unstable and contingently produced ‘self’. The two monographs under consideration here investigate these themes, especially the problem of ‘regard’, that is, how individuals saw and assessed each other. Although the authors analyze different phenomena – biographical notices for Jean-Luc Chappey, fashion and credit for Clare Haru Crowston – both explore the practices that developed in the 18thC and early 19thC for representing and managing reputations. To be sure, the use of print and fashion to assert one’s standing in society had existed for centuries. Two developments, however, altered their importance in the 18thC. First, the consumer revolution, which made print and fashion increasingly accessible. This revolution offered new means for understanding the world (print) and expressing oneself (fashion). Second, the rise of a critical public sphere in which moral assessments about individuals – what they wrote, for example, and what they wore – became increasingly difficult to control. Struggles over social standing took place in an increasingly competitive world, where textual accounts of one’s life and work (Chappey) and sartorial strategies (Crowston) became vulnerable to the vicissitudes of market forces and public opinion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  cultural_history  social_history  social_order  status  identity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  public_sphere  celebrity  consumers  consumerism  public_opinion  reputation  social_capital  Bourdieu  Foucault  biography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Amanda Vickery - Those Gorgeous Georgians - Tercentenary Review | academia.edu
Downloaded docx to iPhone -- We tend to associate the Georgian era with glacial calm, tinkling tea cups, and whispering silk dresses, an oasis of elegance and calm between the strife of the Civil War and the grime and class struggle of the Victorians. But this is a pallid Sunday teatime vision of the eighteenth century. Th... - published as article in The Telegraph(?)
paper  academia  downloaded  memory-cultural  cultural_history  social_history  British_history  English_lit  art_history  music_history  elite_culture  court_culture  18thC  19thC  monarchy  change-social  historiography  politeness  public_opinion  popular_culture  consumers  urbanism  social_order  crime  fiscal-military_state  colonialism  trade  status  hierarchy  religious_history 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Alain Charlet and Jeffrey Owens - An International Perspective on VAT - Tax Notes International, Sept 2010
An International Perspective on VAT -- by Alain Charlet and Jeffrey Owens -- Tax Notes International, Vol 59, No. 12, pp 943-54 -- September 20, 2010 -- Downloaded pdf from OECD > Centre for Tax Polic...
article  OECD  OECD_economies  taxes  tax_collection  consumers  fiscal_policy  economic_growth  political_economy  political_culture  government_finance  redistribution  sovereign_debt  inequality  downloaded  EF-add  from notes
november 2014 by dunnettreader
David Fields - NAKED KEYNESIANISM: Ben Fine on the Material Culture of Financialisation
A FESSUD Working paper by Ben Fine. -- From the abstract: -- The purpose of this paper is threefold. First is to comment upon the nature of financialisation. Second is to frame how this leads financialisation to be understood whether consciously or otherwise. And, third, is to draw out implications for surveying households as their experiences and understandings of, and reactions to, financialisation without specifically designing a questionnaire itself for this purpose. As should already be apparent, underpinning this contribution is the presumption that financialisation is a characteristic of contemporary capitalism (and that the term is also an appropriate category for representing this characteristic). The material culture of financialisation is addressed by drawing upon the 10 Cs approach that was developed for the study of consumption, highlighting how it is Constructed, Construed, Commodified, Conforming, Contextual, Contradictory, Closed, Contested, Collective, and Chaotic. - downloaded pdf to Note
economic_culture  financialization  social_theory  consumers  finance_capital  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
ESMA Economic Report No. 1 - Retailisation in the EU - 2013
They look at higher yield, opaque retail products - "alternative" UCITS and structured products. Surprise, on a risk-weighted basis your plain vanilla bond index outperforms. And not just because of ...
report  EU  ESMA  financial_regulation  consumers  consumer_protection  NBFI  regulation-harmonization  regulation-enforcement  downloaded  from notes
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Zephyr Teachout, Lina Khan - Market Structure and Political Law: A Taxonomy of Power :: SSRN September 7, 2014
Zephyr Teachout, Fordham University School of Law -- Lina Khan, Yale University - Law School -- Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy, Forthcoming. **--** The goal of this Article is to create a way of seeing how market structure is innately political. It provides a taxonomy of ways in which large companies frequently exercise powers that possess the character of governance. Broadly, these exercises of power map onto three bodies of activity we generally assign to government: to set policy, to regulate markets, and to tax. We add a fourth category — which we call "dominance," after Brandeis — as a kind of catchall describing the other political impacts. The activities we outline will not always fit neatly into these categories, nor do all companies engage in all of these levels of power — that is not the point. The point is that Bank of America and Exxon govern our lives in a way that, say, the local ice cream store in your hometown does not. Explicitly understanding the power these companies wield as a form of political power expands the range of legal tools we should consider when setting policy around them. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 38 - Keywords: antitrust
paper  SSRN  political_economy  economic_culture  big_business  antitrust  regulation  power-asymmetric  legal_system  consumers  governance  governmentality  corporate_citizenship  consumer_protection  concentration-industry  dispute_resolution  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Isabel Karremann and Anja Müller, eds. - Mediating Identities in Eighteenth-Century England (2011) | Ashgate
This volume engages in a critical discussion of the connection between historically specific categories of identity determined by class, gender, nationality, religion, political factions and age, and the media available at the time, including novels, newspapers, trial reports, images and the theatre. Recognizing the proliferation of identities in the epoch, these essays explore the ways in which different media determined constructions of identity and were in turn shaped by them. *--* Introduction: mediating identities in 18th-century England, Isabel Karremann; *--* Identifying an age-specific English literature for children, Anja Müller; *--* Found and lost in mediation: manly identity in Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, Isabel Karremann; *--* Gender identity in sentimental and pornographic fiction: Pamela and Fanny Hill, Franz Meier; *--* Paratexts and the construction of author identities: the preface as threshold and thresholds in the preface, Katharina Rennhak; *--* Owning identity: the 18th-century actress and theatrical property, Felicity Nussbaum; *--* Constructing identity in 18th-century comedy: schools of scandal, observation and performance, Anette Pankratz; *--* Material sites of discourse and the discursive hybridity of identities, Uwe Böker; *--* Constructions of political identity: the example of impeachments, Anna-Christina Giovanopoulos; *--* The public sphere, mass media, fashion and the identity of the individual, Christian Huck; *--* Topography and aesthetics: mapping the British identity in painting, Isabelle Baudino; *--* The panoramic gaze: the control of illusion and the illusion of control, Michael Meyer; *--* Peripatetics of citizenship in the 1790s, Christoph Houswitschka; *--* Critical responses, Rainer Emig, Hans-Peter Wagner and Christoph Heyl - downloaded introduction to Note
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  politics-and-literature  English_lit  literary_history  novels  theater  theatre-Restoration  gender  masculinity  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  impeachment  Somers  Harley  public_sphere  Habermas  aesthetics  consumers  children  family  citizenship  national_ID  identity  identity_politics  Defoe  comedy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Hutchings - The ' Turk Phenomenon' and the Repertory of the Late Elizabethan Playhouse | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 10.1-39
"Turk plays" popular up to Charles I - late-Elizabethan theatre drew on a conventional narrative of fear that was also.. one of fascination. ?..also energised by 2 linked events: the Reformation and Elizabeth's promotion of Anglo-Ottoman relations after excommunication by Pope Pius V in 1570. ?..in the last decade or so of the 16thC a sizeable proportion of the playhouse repertory became deeply influenced by this development... a complex artistic, ideological, and commercial phenomenon. -- In shifting from "author"-centred approaches that many theorists believe to be anachronistic to an emphasis on how companies operated, scholars have drawn attention to ...early modern theatre as a collective enterprise. - By its very nature the staging of the Ottoman Empire was sustained by artistic cross-fertilisation that was, in a broader sense collaborative .. as well as competitive. -- These plays were not necessarily mere ciphers of the historical past or present. The Jew of Malta far from endorses the behaviour of the besieged Christians in 1565. It is remarkable for its resistance to the Malta narrative in Christian accounts where the Turkish defeat (like at Lepanto) was celebrated. - While the Tamburlaine plays and their spin-offs called attention to Turkish tyranny and the Ottoman threat, the move away from the Marlovian aesthetic signalled a more ironic approach. Thus in Henry V, Henry's proposal to Katherine that they should produce a son to recapture Constantinople (an anachronism) is undercut by the ambiguous, "Shall we not?" For the audience a deeper irony is available - "the original phrase 'to go to Constantinople to take the Turk by the beard' became a repository for vacuous ideals, a phrase that could only be rehearsed with an increasing sense of self-satire" -- online journal html
article  English_lit  theater  genre  16thC  Tudor  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Ottomans  cultural_history  playwrights  actors  trade-policy  consumers  exotic  orientalism  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Papacy-English_relations  Counter-Reformation  elite_culture  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - globalinequality: Where I disagree and agree with Debraj Ray’s critique of Piketty’s Capital in the 21s Century - June 2014
Debraj’s error consists...in not realizing that normal capitalist relations of production (where capitalists tend to be rich) are forgotten when we look at economic laws in an abstract manner. Not doing that is precisely a great virtue of Piketty’s book. Surely, (a) if capital/labor proportions were the same across income distribution; (b) if, more extremely, capitalists were poor and workers rich; (c) if capital were state-owned, all of these contradictions would disappear. But none of (a)-(c) conditions holds in contemporary capitalism. So Piketty’s economic laws and contradictions of capitalism do exist. Where do I agree wit Debraj? That Kuznets curve cannot be easily dismissed. I am currently working on the idea that we are now witnessing the upswing of the 2nd Kuznets curve since the Industrial revolution. Moreover I believe this is not only the 2nd but perhaps 5th, 6th or 10th curve over the past 1000 years in the West. Does this agreement on Kuznets then, by itself, imply that my defense of Piketty’s mechanism cannot be right or consistent? Not at all. Piketty isolated the key features of capitalist inequality trends when they are left to themselves: the forces of divergence (inequality) will win. But there are also other forces: capital destruction, wars, confiscatory taxation, hyperinflation, pressure of trade unions, high taxation of capital, rising importance of labor and higher wages, that at different times go the other way, and, in a Kuznets-like fashion, drive inequality down. So, I believe, Piketty has beautifully uncovered the forces of divergence, mentioned some of the forces of convergence, but did not lay to rest the ghost of Kuznets inverted U shaped curve
books  reviews  economic_history  economic_theory  political_economy  Piketty  capitalism  wealth  labor  wages  Marx  macroeconomics  economic_growth  inequality  cliometrics  Kuznets_curve  savings  investment  profit  rentiers  consumers  Medieval  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
JW Mason - The Slack Wire: Further Thoughts on Anti-Financialization - May 2014
Together, these fictional transactions now make up 20 percent of GDP, and fully a third of apparent household consumption. Of course, that might change. The decline of homeownership and the creation of a rental market for single-family homes may turn the fiction of a housing sector of tenants and profit-seeking landlords into a reality. One result of Obamacare -- intended or otherwise -- will be to replace collective purchases of health insurance by employers with individual purchases by households. Maybe the Kochs and Mark Zuckerberg will join forces and succeed in privatizing the schools. But none of that has happened yet. What's striking to me is how many critics of contemporary capitalism -- including Cynamon and Fazzari themselves -- have accepted the myth of rising household consumption, without realizing there's no such thing. The post 1980s rise in consumption is a statistical artifact of the ideology of capitalism -- a way of pretending that a world of collective production and consumption is a world of private market exchange. -- The underlying issue from my point of view is that we have an economic discourse that collapses capitalism, finance, markets, and productive activity into a single frame. But these are all different things, with their own distinct logics. We have to recognize that financial relations evolve independently of relations of production and consumption. Changes in assets and debt don't have to reflect anything happening in the "real" economy.
economic_history  US_economy  20thC  consumers  statistics  debt  capitalism  economic_theory  financial_economics  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Slack Wire: The Nonexistent Rise in Household Consumption
Did you know that about 10 percent of private consumption in the US consists of Medicare and Medicaid? Despite the fact that these are payments by the government to health care providers, they are counted by the BEA both as income and consumption spending for households. I bet you didn't know that. I bet plenty of people who work with the national income accounts for a living don't know that. I know I didn't know it, until I read this new working paper by Barry Cynamon and Steve Fazzari. I've often thought that the best macroeconomics is just accounting plus history. This paper is an accounting tour de force. What they've done is go through the national accounts and separate out the components of household income and expenditure that represent cashflows received and made by households, from everything else. -- long discussion of paper at SSRN - didn't download -- downloaded pdf to Note of Mason paper showing household debt not from borrowing for consumption but effects of high interest and disinflation
paper  SSRN  economic_history  US_economy  consumers  debt  wages  financialization  housing  health_care  statistics  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Big Data and Discrimination | Demos - May 2014
On May 1, the White House released a 90 day review studying the effects of big data and privacy, led by Obama's Counsel, John Podesta. Big data truly has enormous potential for social change and creative innovation. However, a key finding of the review is that big data analytics has the potential to lead to discriminatory outcomes and to evade and stymie hard-won civil rights protections in housing, employment, credit, and the consumer market. Fundamentally, big data creates a power imbalance between those who hold and apply the data and between those who knowingly or unknowingly supply it. The review finds that perfect personalization, which is the fusion of many different kinds of data, processed in real time, can lead to overt and covert forms of discrimination in pricing, services, and opportunities.
US_government  Internet  tech  civil_liberties  inequality  Innovation  consumers 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Jones - Fraud, Failure, and Frustration: This Is the Story of America's First Energy Transition | The Atlantic April 2014
In addition to learning the techniques to ignite anthracite, consumers also needed to invest in specialized technology. Because air needs to flow through pieces of anthracite and there must be space for the ash to fall away, homeowners could not rely on the open-hearth fireplaces they used for wood. Instead, they had to purchase specialized stoves or grates—an expensive upfront investment that discouraged many from experimenting with anthracite. In order to lower these barriers to entry, anthracite promoters worked with local manufacturers to increase their production of stoves and lower the costs. They helped stimulate a remarkable boom in stove design: from 1815 to 1839, the Patent Office issued 329 awards to stove manufacturers, nearly four percent of all patents awarded in this period. By 1831, consumers could buy stoves for as little as five dollars, bringing the material requirement for burning anthracite within reach of most working-class families.
US_history  economic_culture  energy  consumers  intellectual_property  climate 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Şevket Pamuka1 and Maya Shatzmiller - Plagues, Wages, and Economic Change in the Islamic Middle East, 700–1500 | The Journal of Economic History - Cambridge Journals Online
This study establishes long-term trends in the purchasing power of the wages of unskilled workers and develops estimates for GDP per capita for medieval Egypt and Iraq. Wages were heavily influenced by two long-lasting demographic shocks, the Justinian Plague and the Black Death and the slow population recovery that followed. As a result, they remained above the subsistence minimum for most of the medieval era. We also argue that the environment of high wages that emerged after the Justinian Plague contributed to the Golden Age of Islam by creating demand for higher income goods.
article  paywall  economic_history  economic_culture  demography  Islamic_civilization  medieval_history  Medieval  plague  Labor_markets  consumers  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Izabella Kaminska - The Bitcoin personality cult lives on | FT Alphaville Feb 2014
Izzy being brilliant as usual -- In our minds, no product is more important than ourselves. And that’s because the ultimate reward of propaganda, if used wisely, is the sort of hierarchal positioning that was previously only ever associated with dictator-level personality cults.-- As Caesar and Augustus knew only too well, a personality cult will never successfully penetrate public minds if it is too focused on itself. Conversely it needs to be masterfully disassociated from self promotion, and re-associated with altruistic value, humour, or benevolence. In Caesar and Augustus’ case it was only through publicly rejecting kingly power, that they were able to create a much more powerful empirical office to replace it. A masterful slight of hand and example of misdirection. -- The distribution of highly doctored selfies eventually begins to nauseate. No-one likes a narcissist or a megalomaniac. Meanwhile, too much association with high-end products or exclusivity meanwhile backfires with the “Rich Kids of Instagram” effect. Today’s most effective propaganda consequently is the sort that inspires people to care about things other than themselves. It’s not aspirational as much as experience or ideology based.
consumerism  consumers  Internet  social_media  propaganda  rhetoric  ideology  libertarianism  self-regulation  Augustan_Rome  status  self-love  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Heterodox Economics - Readings | HMiRN
Extensive list of books, chapters, journal articles, periodically updated since 2011 -- Contents --
1. History and Methodology of Heterodox Microeconomics
2. Critiques of Mainstream Microeconomics
3. Principles of Heterodox Microeconomic Theory
4. Theory of the Business Enterprise
5. Structure of Production and Costs of the Business Enterprise
6. Costing, Pricing, and Prices
7. Investment, Finance, and Employment
8. Households, Consumption, and Market Demand
9. Industry and Market
10. Competition
11. Corporate Governance, Market Governance, and Market Regulation
12. Social Welfare
13. Heterodox Microfoundations and Modeling the Economy
bibliography  economic_theory  economic_history  economic_models  economic_sociology  firms-theory  Labor_markets  capital  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  M&A  regulation  consumers  consumer_demand  monopolies  finance_capital  taxes  competition  investment  prices  wages  heterodox_economics  microeconomics  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Helen Berry - Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 375-394
Shopping was increasingly seen as a potentially pleasurable activity for middling and upper sorts in Hanoverian England, a distinctive yet everyday part of life, especially in London. This survey considers the emergence of a polite shopping culture at this time, and presents a 'browse-bargain' model as a framework for considering contemporary references to shopping in written records and literary texts. The decline of polite shopping is charted with reference to the rise of cash-only businesses at the end of the century, and the shift towards a more hurried and impersonal form of shopping noted by early nineteenth-century shopkeepers, assistants and customers. -- bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  cultural_history  18thC  British_history  consumers  consumerism  politeness  leisure  London  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900 - TOC -- JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12, 2002
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900: A Conference Held at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California, and the Institute of Historical Research, University of London -- Introduction (pp. 263-266) John Tosh. -- (1) From Civilitas to Civility: Codes of Manners in Medieval and Early Modern England (pp. 267-289) John Gillingham. -- (2) Rank, Manners and Display: The Gentlemanly House, 1500-1750 (pp. 291-310) Nicholas Cooper. -- (3) The Uses of Eighteenth-Century Politeness (pp. 311-331) Paul Langford. -- (4) Polite 'Persons': Character, Biography and the Gentleman (pp. 333-354) Philip Carter. -- (5) Topographies of Politeness (pp. 355-374) R. H. Sweet. -- (6) Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England (pp. 375-394) Helen Berry. -- 7) Creating a Veil of Silence? Politeness and Marital Violence in the English Household (pp. 395-415) Elizabeth Foyster. -- (8) Courses in Politeness: The Upbringing and Experiences of Five Teenage Diarists, 1671-1860 (pp. 417-430) Anthony Fletcher. -- (9) The Brash Colonial: Class and Comportment in Nineteenth-Century Australia (pp. 431-453) Penny Russell. -- (10) Gentlemanly Politeness and Manly Simplicity in Victorian England (pp. 455-472) John Tosh
journal  article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  social_history  politeness  status  elites  consumers  education  domesticity  gentleman  manners  moral_reform  moral_philosophy  masculinity  houses  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
PayPal who? Dwolla is the most daring digital payment startup you've never heard of | The Verge
"Dwolla is a fascinating company, because they are trying to build a whole new set of rails for moving money," says Mark Egerman, who ran the mobile payments division at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. "The ACH system is completely broken, and it's amazing to watch someone take that on." Working at the CFPB, Egerman saw firsthand how hard merchants were hit by the credit card system. "Restaurants were losing huge amounts of money and having to wait weeks to get their funds. Whoever can solve that problem will have a huge impact and a huge business"

But while Egerman is excited about Dwolla's mission, he remains skeptical about their chances. "In order for it to be really useful you need a ton of supply and demand. They are trying to build a two-sided market, and that is very tough, because you can't attract one without the other. It's a chicken and egg problem."
financial_system  banking  tech  consumers  SMEs 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Traders: the East India Company & Asia : Exhibitions : What's on : RMG
About Traders
Traders: the East India Company and Asia is a new permanent gallery exploring Britain’s maritime trade with Asia, focusing on the role played by the East India Company.
16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Asia  Britain  British_Empire  East_India_Company  economic_history  social_history  cultural_history  globalization  trade  imperialism  website  exhibition  consumers  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Philip Benedict: More than Market and Manufactory: The Cities of Early Modern France (1997)
JSTOR: French Historical Studies, Vol. 20, No. 3 (Summer, 1997), pp. 511-538 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Although French social and economic historians have closely linked the study of early modern cities to the study of commerce and manufacturing, other social, political, and cultural developments also stimulated urban growth between 1500 and 1789, notably the growth of the state, urban expropriation of rural land, and the movement to the cities of old noble families. Investigation of the pace of these trends suggests that they made their effects most strongly felt between 1550 and 1700, although continuing thereafter. The concentration of elite wealth in the cities that they promoted transformed urban social structures, stimulated luxury production and consumption, and formed the essential context for the development of many new cultural institutions and practices, from permanent theater companies to "coaching in visits."
article  jstor  cultural_history  social_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  France  Paris  urbanization  consumers  elites  urban  commerce  luxury  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul R. Sharp and Jacob L. Weisdorf: French revolution or industrial revolution? A note on the contrasting experiences of England and France up to 1800 - Springer
Springer full text html -- At the end of the eighteenth century, England and France both underwent revolutions: France the French Revolution, England the industrial revolution. This note sheds new light on these contrasting experiences in the histories of England and France by looking at the evolution of real consumer prices in London and Paris in the centuries leading up to 1800. Whilst in London, building workers were facing low and stable consumer prices over the period, leaving plenty of scope for a demand-driven consumer revolution (in particular after 1650), their Parisian counterparts had to engage in a year-long grind to maintain a decent living, and often had to cut consumption to make ends meet. The exercise conducted in the present paper gives a quantitative and economic underpinning to the notion that the French revolution did not arise out of nowhere, but rather had its roots in centuries of hardship amongst working class people as they struggled to make a living. -- This paper was presented at the ‘International Comparison of Output and Productivity in History’ session at the XV World Economic History Congress in Utrecht in 2009. -- Keywords Consumer revolution French revolution Great divergence Industrious revolution Industrial revolution Labour input
article  economic_history  economic_culture  economic_growth  17thC  18thC  Britain  France  London  Paris  Labor_markets  wages  Industrial_Revolution  consumers  consumer_demand  French_Revolution  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Helen Berry: Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England (2002)
JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 375-394 -- Shopping was increasingly seen as a potentially pleasurable activity for middling and upper sorts in Hanoverian England, a distinctive yet everyday part of life, especially in London. This survey considers the emergence of a polite shopping culture at this time, and presents a 'browse-bargain' model as a framework for considering contemporary references to shopping in written records and literary texts. The decline of polite shopping is charted with reference to the rise of cash-only businesses at the end of the century, and the shift towards a more hurried and impersonal form of shopping noted by early nineteenth-century shopkeepers, assistants and customers.
article  jstor  cultural_history  economic_history  18thC  Britain  London  consumers  sociability  politeness  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
JON STOBART: Gentlemen and shopkeepers: supplying the country house in eighteenth-century England (2011)
JSTOR: The Economic History Review, Vol. 64, No. 3 (AUGUST 2011), pp. 885-904 -- Wiley - STOBART, J. (2011), Gentlemen and shopkeepers: supplying the country house in eighteenth-century England. The Economic History Review, 64: 885–904. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-0289.2010.00562.x -- The country house is well recognized as a site of elite patronage, an important vehicle of social and political ambition, and a statement of power and taste. Yet we know relatively little about the networks of supply and purchasing patterns of rural elites, or about how their practices related to broader changes in material culture. Drawing on a large sample of bills and receipts of the Leigh family of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire, this article recreates the processes through which the material culture of the family home was constructed. These reveal London as the source for many highquality goods, although the pattern of supply was not a simple dichotomy of localeveryday and metropolitan-luxury purchases. They also show the large number of shopkeepers patronized as the Leighs spread their purchases through choice, convenience, and expediency. Relating this to wider conceptions of consumption, the Leighs emerge as engaging in layered and sometimes conflicting consumer cultures. They were concerned with fashion as novelty and a marker of rank; but they also valued traditional markers of status. Social distinction was achieved through a continued emphasis on title and lineage as much as fashion or taste—value systems that were unavailable to the middling sorts.
article  Wiley  paywall  cultural_history  economic_history  18thC  Britain  London  country_house  elites  consumers  status  fashion  patronage  lineage  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Trevor Ross: Copyright and the Invention of Tradition (1992)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 1-27 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- limits on perpetual copyright of 1710 upheld in1774 -- creation of defined property rights simultaneously creates the public domain -- by 1774 a notion that English culture involved a tradition that belonged to everyone -- bibliography on 2ndry sources that have tracked the legal details and booksellers practices, cartel etc
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  canon  cultural_history  legal_history  18thC  1710s  laws  litigation  intellectual_property  publishing  consumers  reading  creativity  authors  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Hannah Greig and Giorgio Riello - Eighteenth-Century Interiors—Redesigning the Georgian: Introduction | Journal of Design History
J Design Hist (2007) 20 (4): 273-289. doi: 10.1093/jdh/epm025 -- The eighteenth-century interior has been approached from a range of different perspectives. Recent research has significantly complicated our understanding of ‘Georgian’ style, bringing new questions and new methodologies to bear on the meaning, function, and contemporary perception and use of interiors in the 1700s. This special issue brings together some of these new perspectives in order to reflect on this changing and, over the last decade, particularly buoyant field. These articles are a selection from a larger body of research presented at a two-day conference on ‘The Georgian Interior’ held at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in November 2005.1 Celebrating the fifth anniversary of the V&A’s redesigned British Galleries, the ‘Georgian Interior’ event formed part of a series of conferences examining interiors from the Tudors and the Stuarts to the Victorians.
article  historiography  cultural_history  architecture  design  style  18thC  consumers  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
China’s End of Exuberance by Michael Spence - Project Syndicate July 2013
Analysts and investors have at least two related concerns. One is that, facing declining growth, policymakers will resort to excess investment or leverage (or both), creating instability. The other is that they will resort to neither, and that no alternative growth engines will have been started, leading to an extended slowdown with unpredictable political consequences at home In short, many investors are nervous because China’s future growth story is unclear to them. It is certainly less clear than the previous story, which cannot be retold.
China  investment  consumers  macroeconomics  development  economic_growth  institutional_investors 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
J Weil: Bank of America’s Foreclosure Frenzy - Bloomberg 6-21-13
The former employees’ statements were filed with a federal court in Boston as part of a lawsuit against Bank of America by homeowners who say they were improperly denied permanent loan modifications. Bank of America says it will respond to the statements in greater detail in a court filing.The workers gave horrific accounts about Bank of America’s compliance with the Home Affordable Modification Program. One consistent theme was that they said they were told to deceive borrowers about the status of their applications.

We have known for years that the U.S. Treasury Department’s Home Affordable Modification Programfailed miserably at its stated goal of helping struggling homeowners. In part, that’s because companies and divisions of major banks that service mortgage loans often can make more money from foreclosures than from loan modifications.

There already has been a $25 billion nationwide whitewash of a settlement between regulators and big banks over improper foreclosure practices, along with billion-dollar payments under a different settlement to consultants who were hired to review those practices. Nobody was prosecuted, much less wrist-slapped.
UK_economy  housing  banking  financial_regulation  consumers  property  fraud  financial_crisis 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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