dunnettreader + constitutional_regime   9

Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Doohwan Ahn - From Greece to Babylon: The political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743) | History of European Ideas, Dec 2011 — ScienceDirect
History of European Ideas, December 2011, Vol.37(4):421–437, doi:10.1016/j.histeuroideas.2010.12.005 -- Doohwan Ahn , University of Cambridge, Hughes Hall
This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, I demonstrate that Ramsay was as much indebted to Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet's Discourse on Universal History (1681) as he was to Fénelon's political romance. Ramsay took advantage of Xenophon's silence about the eponymous hero's adolescent education in his Cyropaedia, or the Education of Cyrus (c. 380 B.C.), but he was equally inspired by the Book of Daniel, where the same Persian prince was eulogised as the liberator of the Jewish people from their captivity in Babylon. The main thrust of Ramsay's adaptation was not only to revamp the Humanist-cum-Christian theory and practice of virtuous kingship for a restored Jacobite regime, but on a more fundamental level, to tie in secular history with biblical history. In this respect, Ramsay's New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus, was not just another Fénelonian political novel but more essentially a work of universal history. In addition to his Jacobite model of aristocratic constitutional monarchy, it was this Bossuetian motive for universal history, which was first propounded by the German reformer Philipp Melanchthon in his Chronicon Carionis (1532), that most decisively separated Ramsay from Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, author of another famous advice book for princes of the period, The Idea of a Patriot King (written in late 1738 for the education of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales, but officially published in 1749).
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  universal_history  France  British_history  political_philosophy  Ramsay  Bolingbroke  Fenelon  Bossuet  Jacobites  monarchy  Patriot_King  mirror_for_princes  Bible-as-history  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  Xenophon  Old_Testament  Cyrus_the_Great  Melanchthon  constitutional_monarchy  constitutional_regime  limited_monarchy  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Bonnie_Prince_Charlie  kingship 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - “From Selden to Mendelssohn: Hebraism and Religious Freedom” (2013) | in Skinner & van Gelderen, Freedom and the Construction of Europe - CUP
Nelson E. “From Selden to Mendelssohn: Hebraism and Religious Freedom”. In: Quentin Skinner and Martin van Gelderen , eds., Freedom and the Construction of Europe: New Perspectives on Philosophical, Religious, and Political Controversies. Cambridge University Press ; 2013. - scan of chapter -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  chapter  political_philosophy  political_history  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  freedom_of_conscience  tolerance  secularism  secularization  Church-and-State  Erastianism  Hebrew_commonwealth  Selden  Mendelssohn  legal_history  legal_theory  constitutional_regime  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Jack Balkin - Protestant Constitutionalism: A Series of Footnotes to Sanford Levinson | Balkinization: - September 2010
little essay written in honor of my dear friend Sandy Levinson, on the occasion of the Lifetime Achievement Award he received from the Law and Courts section at the American Political Science Association convention -- One of Sandy's most fruitful ideas is constitutional protestantism, the idea that each citizen has the right to decide for him or herself what the Constitution means. Sandy stated this idea prominently in an article in the Tulane Law Review in 1987, noting the importance of Attorney General Edwin Meese's arguments that the decisions of the Supreme Court bind only the parties before the court. -- The idea is developed more fully in Sandy's great 1988 book, Constitutional Faith, in which he distinguishes between constitutional protestantism and constitutional catholicism. Constitutional catholicism stands for the view that a certain group of professional or learned authorities has the last word on interpretation, while protestantism, as we have seen, invites all believers to offer their views on the meaning of scripture. Sandy gives both positions their due, but he is essentially a constitutional protestant. -- Protestant constitutionalism leads almost inevitably to the study of social organization and culture. Once you acknowledge that many individuals have different views about the Constitution, you must also acknowledge that these individuals, like good protestants, do not simply keep to themselves. They create congregations. They form groups of like-minded believers and go out into the world and try to convert others. Thus, a focus on protestant constitutionalism leads naturally to a focus on social movements and political parties as engines of constitutional change. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
US_constitution  US_politics  political_culture  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_reasoning  change-social  change-intellectual  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  social_movements  Protestants  schisms  sola_scriptura  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Critical Dialogue: Nadia Urbinati (Democracy Disfigured) and Elizabeth Beaumont (The Civic Constitution) | - Academia.edu - Perspectives on Politics, June 2015
Critiques and responses(1) The Civic Constitution: Civic Visions and Struggles in the Path toward Constitutional Democracy. By Elizabeth Beaumont. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. 386p. (2) Democracy Disfigured: Opinion, Truth, and the People. By Nadia Urbinati. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. 320 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_society  civic_virtue  constitutionalism  constitutions  constitutional_regime  public_opinion  political_participation  political_culture  community  political_discourse  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack M. Balkin -The Last Days of Disco: Why the American Political System is Dysfunctional :: SSRN - Boston University Law Review, Vol. 94, 2014
...what looks like constitutional dysfunction is actually constitutional transition, (..)Americans last experienced this sense of dysfunction during the late 1970s and early 1980s (..) the transition to a new constitutional regime will be far more difficult than those effected in 1932 and 1980. (1) the growth of the modern state and changes in the role of the presidency mean that even the most politically adept and fortunate presidents face greater obstacles to implementing transformative change than they once did; they are less able than past reconstructive leaders to disrupt existing institutions and clear the ground for a new politics. This, by itself, does not prevent the emergence of a new constitutional regime. But (2) the current transition will be especially difficult because we are near the peak of a long cycle of increasing polarization between the nation’s two major political parties. That polarization greatly raises the stakes of a transition to a new constitutional regime. The defenders of the old order have every incentive to resist the emergence of a new regime until the bitter end. A long and frustrating transition will have important side effects. (1) a dysfunctional Congress tempts the Executive to act unilaterally, (..). Future presidents may use these new sources of power even when the period of dysfunction has passed. (2) sustained political dysfunction also tends to empower the judiciary vis-à-vis Congress. Moreover, judges appointed by the older dominant party, late in the regime, are less likely to engage in judicial restraint and more likely to push the jurisprudential envelope. This helps explain some of the Roberts Court's recent work. -- PDF File: 40 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_politics  US_constitution  SCOTUS  exec_branch  US_President  Congress  US_judiciary  separation-of-powers  faction  GOP  Democrats  legal_history  political_change  political_culture  legal_culture  originalism  change-social  power-asymmetric  ideology  conflict  competition-political  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  government-forms  government-roles  polarization  policymaking  political_gridlock  limited_government  judicial_review  conservatism  right-wing  political_participation  rule_of_law  instrumentalist  means-justify-ends  legitimacy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Gans - The Role of Three-Judge Courts in Conservative Attacks on Campaign Finance Reform and Voting Rights | Balkinization - June 2015
Cases decided by a single federal district court judge (..) and are very rarely accepted for Supreme Court review. (..) the Supreme Court has complete control over its certiorari (discretionary) docket, and can refuse to hear a case for any reason without setting any judicial precedent for the future. But 3-judge court cases are radically different, as the Supreme Court is required to act on a direct appeal from the decision of a 3-judge court. When such an appeal is filed, the Justices have 3 options—either to summarily affirm, to dismiss the appeal for want of a substantial federal question, or to accept the case for full review. Unlike a denial of a petition for a writ of certiorari, each of these actions sets a precedent for the future. Because the Justices are often wary of setting a precedent without full briefing, direct appeals from 3-judge courts quite often receive full review on the merits. (..) The Supreme Court agreed to review Shelby County despite the absence of a circuit split, producing a landmark ruling gutting a key part of the Voting Rights Act and striking a blow against the power of Congress to protect the right to vote free from racial discrimination. Shelby County is the exception that proves the rule. Virtually all the big Roberts Court cases that have changed the ground rules for our democracy have been direct appeals from 3-judge courts. What this reflects is a long term conservative strategy for getting blockbuster campaign finance and voting rights cases to the Supreme Court. It is a strategy that has paid off time and again as John Roberts and his conservative colleagues have made it easier for corporations and the wealthy to spend unlimited sums of money on elections, and harder for Americans to vote in them.
Instapaper  SCOTUS  US_constitution  constitutional_law  judiciary  judicial_review  conservative_legal_challenges  voting  rights-legal  constitutional_regime  Roberts_Court  campaign_finance  partisanship-judiciary  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader

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