dunnettreader + communication   12

Nicolas Duvoux - Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article
Une clarification sémantique préalable
I - La querelle de la sécularisation et l’interprétation de la modernité
II - Malaise dans la civilisation post-moderne
III - La modernité sortie de la modernité ?
Duvoux Nicolas, « Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels», Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 135-152
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-135.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0135.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
multiculturalism  modernity  psychoanalysis  poststructuralist  social_capital  structuralism  cultural_critique  relativism  modernity-emergence  intellectual_history  identity  French_Enlightenment  constructivism  political_philosophy  subjectivity  alienation  agency-structure  bibliography  social_sciences-post-WWII  classes  community  change-social  phenomenology  mass_culture  popular_culture  secularization  communication  anti-modernity  article  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  ideology  Habermas  modernization  mobility  public_sphere  French_intellectuals  political_science  psychology  social_theory  consumerism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Jean-Claude Monod , review essay - Habermas et la dialectique de la sécularisation | La Vie des idées - 8 décembre 2008
Jürgen Habermas, Entre naturalisme et religion. Les défis de la démocratie, traduit de l’allemand par Christian Bouchindhomme et Alexandre Dupeyrix, Paris, Gallimard, 2008, 380 p. 22, 50€. -- Et si la raison, comme le montre aujourd’hui la logique marchande, était finalement bien plus capable de calculer des moyens que de poser des fins ? Le dernier recueil de Jürgen Habermas, le chantre de la raison communicationnelle, témoigne d’un surprenant revirement vers la religion et le registre compassionnel. -- Mots-clés : communication | religion | raison | sécularisation
books  reviews  political_philosophy  social_theory  secularization  post-secular  post-Cold_War  cultural_critique  political_culture  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  values  communication  rationality  empathy  religious_culture  epistemology  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-moral  means-justify-ends  dialectic-historical  dialogue  public_sphere  public_goods  community  legitimacy  reason  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Habermas interviewed by Markus Schwering - Essays: Internet and Public Sphere What the Web Can't Do | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 24 July 2014
"After the inventions of writing and printing, digital communication represents the third great innovation on the media plane. With their introduction, these three media forms have enabled an ever growing number of people to access an ever growing mass of information. These are made to be increasingly lasting, more easily. With the last step represented by Internet we are confronted with a sort of “activation” in which readers themselves become authors. Yet, this in itself does not automatically result in progress on the level of the public sphere. [...] The classical public sphere stemmed from the fact that the attention of an anonymous public was “concentrated” on a few politically important questions that had to be regulated. This is what the web does not know how to produce. On the contrary, the web actually distracts and dispels." This is how, among many more subjects, Jürgen Habermas comments the evolution of democratic participation in the internet era. Reset-DoC is pleased to republish the translated version of a long interview published last June on the "Frankfurter Rundschau" for the philosopher's eighty-fifth birthday. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  public_sphere  information-intermediaries  printing  print_culture  Internet  communication  community-virtual  media  political_culture  political_participation  political_press  Habermas  post-secular  cultural_history  cultural_change  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Jag Bhalla - Is 'Information Theory' Misnamed? | Big Think - May 2015
by Jag Bhalla “Information theory” is misnamed. And information operates differently in physics versus biology. 1. Gregory Chaitin applies “information theory”… -- really nice mini essay on the inadequacy of "information theory" to deal with semantic complexity, and why different domains will have very different communication requirements and processes -- e.g. physics vs life sciences, such as genetics, which are much more like algorithms *to say nothing of social sciences and humanities) -- parallels his other mini essays on different logics for different domains, and different analogy-style reasoning for different disciplines -- with lots of links
philosophy_of_science  epistemology  logic  information_theory  communication  IT  physics  biology  links  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim Neff, review - Andrew Pettegree, The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself | Public Books — April 2015
How did we go from that to the news as we now know it, broadcast across the globe and in cycles measured in milliseconds? Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland, finds answers by linking the emergence of news as a mass commodity to Western Europe’s development of communications networks between the 15th and 18th centuries. This network perspective decenters news as a singular object. Instead, what we get is a richly detailed history that shows the invention of news as a messy cultural process, with abrupt turns and setbacks. Major advances in information networks were quickly followed by retreats. Printers would reinvent news, only to fold a year or two later. When newspapers first appeared, a mass readership had to learn how to read brief accounts that provided much less context than the narrative histories with which they were familiar. Pettegree’s history of news suggests that crisis has shadowed journalism from the start. The Invention of News divides the earliest stirrings of modern news into three epochs, starting with the 15th and early 16th centuries, when the printing press spurred the transition from largely private news networks to the earliest forms of public news industries. Next, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, improved communications networks enabled the news to spread faster and to more people at less cost. Finally, in the 17th and 18th centuries, advertising expanded circulations, and Enlightenment ideals brought an empirical approach to news that led it to shed moral overtones.
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_history  cultural_change  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  news  newspapers  publishing  readership  journalism  communication  information  information-markets  Enlightenment  mass_culture  networks-information  public_sphere  disinformation  witchcraft  public_opinion  public_disorder 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Stob, Review: John McGowan, Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy (2012) | KB Journal - 2013
McGowan, John. Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. -- Paul Stob, Department of Communication Studies, Vanderbilt University -- John McGowan’s Pragmatist Politics draws upon the pragmatist tradition—primarily the work of William James, John Dewey, and Kenneth Burke—to formulate a liberal democratic politics for the twenty-first century. At least that’s the overt aim of the book. But what may stand out most to readers of KB Journal is how McGowan seems intent on crafting an attitude. In formulating a pragmatist politics, McGowan fails to explicate political programs and initiatives, he disregards the nuts and bolts of democratic negotiation, and he provides no real strategies for building grassroots coalitions. What he does—and what he does admirably—is present readers with a pragmatist attitude that will, he hopes, come to permeate public culture. -- Stob describes how McGowan links rhetoric and political philosophy, especially using Burke's "comic" frame as fitting a pragmatist approach to goals and public participation of liberal democracy -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  rhetoric-political  conversation  persuasion  Burke_Kenneth  Dewey  James_William  secularism  symbolic_interaction  symbols-political  symbols-religious  communication  community  individualism  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Sennett - Humanism IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 13, No. 2 (Summer 2011)
I have wanted, in sum, to explain in this essay why the label “humanist” is a badge of honor, rather than the name for an exhausted worldview. Humanism’s emphasis on life-narratives, on the enriching experience of difference, and on evaluating tools in terms of human rather than mechanical complexity are all living values—and more, I would say, these are critical measures for judging the state of modern society. Looking back to the origins of these values is not an exercise in nostalgia; it is rather to remind us that we are engaged in a project, still in process, a humanism yet to be realized, of making social experience more open, engaging, and layered. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  downloaded  humanism  Renaissance  19thC  technology  communication  Internet  programming  algorithms  robots 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Two-Way Translation: The Ethics of Engaging with Religious Contributions in Public Deliberation (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-84 -- Using as an exemplar, the 2007 "Evangelical Declaration against Torture," this paper examines the role of religious argument in public life. -- It argues for an absolute ban on the use of torture deploying unashamedly Christian rhetoric, some of it quite powerful and challenging. -- The present paper considers whether there is any affront to the duties of political civility in arguing in these terms. There is a line of argument, associated with John Rawls's book, "Political Liberalism," suggesting that citizens should refrain from discussing issues of public policy in religious or deep-philosophical terms that are not accessible to other citizens. The present paper challenges the conception of inaccessibility on which this Rawlsian position is based. It argues, with Jurgen Habermas, that all sides in a modern pluralist society have a right to state their views as firmly and as deeply as they can, and all sides have the duty to engage with others, and to strain as well as they can to grasp others' meanings. It is not enough to simply announce that one can not understand religious reasons, especially if no good faith effort has been made, using the ample resources available in our culture, to try. Of course, many peoeple will not be convinced by the reasons that are offered in religious discourse; but to argue for their rejection - which is always what may happen in respectable political deliberation - is not to say that the presentation of those reasons was offensive or inappropriate. (This paper was originally presented as the 2010 Meador Lecture at the University of Virginia Law School). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Absolute Principles, Pluralism, Public Reason, Rawls, Religious Reasons, Torture
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  public_sphere  political_discourse  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  political_culture  pluralism  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  Habermas  communication  community  deliberation-public  torture  civic_virtue  civility-political  respect  hermeneutics  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
James Johnson - Communication, Criticism, and the Postmodern Consensus: An Unfashionable Interpretation of Michel Foucault | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Aug., 1997), pp. 559-583
Downloaded pdf to Note -- useful bibliography of lots of interpretations of Foucault with which he takes issue -- the epigraph by Foucault re critique examining buried assumptions and denaturalizing commonly received social arrangements and what passes for knowledge -- why Burke so bent out of shape by Bolingbroke in the 1750s and returns to him and the freethinkers in 1790s
article  jstor  political_philosophy  power  communication  discourse  critique  Foucault  Derrida  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John V. Pickstone: Sketching Together the Modern Histories of Science, Technology, and Medicine (2011)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 102, No. 1 (March 2011), pp. 123-133 -- roundup and looking forward article in issue Focus: Between and Beyond “Histories of Science” and “Histories of Medicine” -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay explores ways to “write together” the awkwardly jointed histories of “science” and “medicine”—but it also includes other “arts” (in the old sense) and technologies. It draws especially on the historiography of medicine, but I try to use terms that are applicable across all of science, technology, and medicine (STM). I stress the variety of knowledges and practices in play at any time and the ways in which the ensembles change. I focus on the various relations of “science” and “medicine,” as they were understood for a succession of periods—from mainly agricultural societies, through industrial societies, to our biomedical present—trying to sketch a history that encompasses daily practices and understandings as well as major conceptual and technical innovations. The model is meant to facilitate inquiry across topics and across times, including those to come.
article  jstor  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  medicine  technology  biology  chemistry  physiology  natural_philosophy  mathematics  communication  IT  evolution  university  academies  education  industry  Industrial_Revolution  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Scientific_Revolution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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