dunnettreader + commercial_law   13

Mark G. Hanna - Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740 (Nov 2015) | UNC Press
Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England's burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns. English piracy and unregulated privateering flourished in the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean because of merchant elites' active support in the North American colonies. Sea marauders represented a real as well as a symbolic challenge to legal and commercial policies formulated by distant and ineffectual administrative bodies that undermined the financial prosperity and defense of the colonies. Departing from previous understandings of deep-sea marauding, this study reveals the full scope of pirates' activities in relation to the landed communities that they serviced and their impact on patterns of development that formed early America and the British Empire. -- Mark G. Hanna is associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. -- cover is the portrait of the Earl of Warwick
books  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  West_Indies  North_America  Atlantic  colonialism  privateers  piracy  economic_history  maritime_history  settler_colonies  commerce  trade  Navigation_Acts  Board_of_Trade  East_India_Company  Indian_Ocean  Pacific  ports  maritime_law  commercial_law  Warwick_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Tung -Leverage in the Board Room: The Unsung Influence of Private Lenders in Corporate Governance:: SSRN - UCLA Law Review, Vol. 57, 2009 (rev'd 2012)
Boston University School of Law --:The influence of banks and other private lenders pervades public companies. From the first day of a lending arrangement, loan covenants and built-in contingency provisions affect managerial decision making. Conventional corporate governance analysis has been slow to notice or account for this lender influence. Corporate governance discourse has traditionally focused only on corporate law arrangements. The few existing accounts of creditors' influence over firm managers emphasize the drastic actions creditors take in extreme cases - when a firm is in serious trouble - but in fact, private lender influence is a routine feature of corporate governance even absent financial distress. (..) I explain the regularity of lender influence on managerial decision making - "lender governance" - comparing this routine influence to conventional governance arrangements and boards of directors in particular. I show that the extent of private lender influence rivals that of conventional governance mechanisms, and I discuss the doctrinal and policy implications of this unsung influence. Accounting for lender governance requires a new examination of corporate fiduciary duties, debtor-creditor laws, and the regulatory reform proposals that have emerged to address the current financial crisis. I also discuss the implications of private lender influence for future corporate governance research. -- PDF File: 69 -- lender governance, corporate governance, covenants, credit agreement, private lender, private debt, creditor, financial regulation, financial crisis -- saved to briefcase
article  SSRN  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  creditors  banking  relationship_lending  financial_regulation  corporate_law  capital_markets  commercial_law  debtors  debtor-creditor  debt-restructuring  financial_crisis  finance_capital  corporate_control 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Locknie Hsu - Convergence, Divergence, and Regulatory Tension - An Asian Perspective :: SSRN September 5, 2014
Singapore Management University - School of Law -- Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 30/201 -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), pp 2-14, June 2014, Working Paper No. 2014/13. *--* Regulatory issues relating to public health, including regulation of access to medicines and tobacco control have increasingly been the source of tension in recent trade and investment negotiations, treaties and disputes. The ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations, which include a number of developing Asian states, are an example that brings some of these issues to the fore and show a divergence of negotiating views. The intersection between public health regulation and trade and investment treaties has given some Asian states significant pause for thought; -- This intersection and resulting tension have led the WTO, WHO and WIPO to work together in an unprecedented manner to address some of the issues at the global level. The law evolving around these issues is demonstrating a deep divergence, in the manner that related disputes are being handled, and in terms of regulatory as well as negotiating stances. As an example, the debate on access to medicines demonstrates a divergence of approaches and proposed global solutions, as numerous proposals for reform of the existing construct (comprising patents and their “progeny” in the form of related commercial rights) are canvassed. Meanwhile, some countries such as India have begun to move ahead to embrace solutions such as compulsory licensing. -- It is suggested that a convergence of purpose(s) is needed, for a convergence of solutions to be found. Until then, the current divergences will continue to feed regulatory tension. -- Keywords: Convergence, divergence, trade, investment, public health, tobacco, pharmceuticals, FTAs, Asia, ASEAN -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Asia_Pacific  Asia  India  IP  convergence-business  technology  technology_transfer  Innovation  health_care  commercial_law  neoliberalism  FDI  trade-agreements  property_rights  public_health  public_goods  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  business-and-politics  investment  WTO  international_organizations  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Consent in Contract Law (revised 2011) :: SSRN
Chapter in THE ETHICS OF CONSENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE, Alan Wertheimer, Franklin G. Miller, eds., Oxford University Press, 2010 -- Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-36 -- Consent, in terms of voluntary choice, is - or, at least, appears to be or purports to be - at the essence of contract law. Contract law, both in principle and in practice, is about allowing parties to enter arrangements on terms they choose - each party imposing obligations on itself in return for obligations another party has placed upon itself. This freedom of contract- an ideal by which there are obligations to the extent, but only to the extent, freely chosen by the parties - is contrasted to the duties of criminal law and tort law, which bind all parties regardless of consent. At the same time, consent, in the robust sense expressed by the ideal of freedom of contract, is arguably absent in the vast majority of the contracts we enter these days, but its absence does little to affect the enforceability of those agreements. Consent to contractual terms often looks like consent to government: present, if at all, only under a fictional (as if) or attenuated rubric. The article begins by a brief examination of the nature of consent, then turns to contract doctrines that turn on the alleged absence of consent (e.g., duress and undue influence); contract rules and principles (e.g., implied terms) that turn on hypothetical consent; the challenges to consent that arise from electronic contracting and bounded rationality, and theories of contract law that emphasize consent. -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  contracts  social_contract  consent  rational_choice  rationality-bounded  power-asymmetric  e-commerce  commercial_law  libertarianism  freedom_of_contract  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters: Hugo Grotius on War and the State (March 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Fernando R. Tesón, a professor at Florida State University College of Law, explores what Grotius thought about the proper relationship between the laws of nature and the laws of nations, what limits (if any) can be legitimately and rightly placed on the conduct of states engaged in war, and what relevance his insights may have today. Responding to his essay are Hans W. Blom, Paul Carrese, and Eric Mack. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  international_law  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  property_rights  just_war  navigation  trade  colonialism  war  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  VOC  commercial_law  state-of-nature  consent  legitimacy  social_contract  sociability  self-interest  self-defense  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Roscoe Pound, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law (1922) - Online Library of Liberty
Roscoe Pound, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1922). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2222> -- A series of lectures given in the William L. Storrs lecture series in 1921 at the Yale University Law School. *--* I: The Function of Legal Philosophy. *--* II: The End of Law *--* III: The Application of Law. *--* IV: Liability. *--* V: Property *--* VI: Contract -- didn't download
books  etexts  legal_theory  legal_system  20thC  intellectual_history  property  property_rights  commercial_law  liability  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christine Churches - Business at Law: Retrieving Commercial Disputes from 18thC Chancery | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 937-954
Recent work on the records of civil litigation in the central courts of Westminster has refined and extended our knowledge of levels of litigation and the types of dispute pursued at law in early modern England. This article discusses two interrelated business disputes at the port of Whitehaven in the first half of the eighteenth century pursued by two of its prominent merchants, both frequent litigants in a period when litigation overall was declining, and suggests some reasons for that decline. It matches the formal court records of King's Bench, Common Pleas, and Chancery with some illuminating, often acerbic, private correspondence, thereby exploring the process and background of litigation, and demonstrating how a third party could influence the conduct and direction of the disputes, while himself remaining almost invisible in the formal legal record. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  economic_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  litigation  Chancery  judiciary  equity  commerce  commercial_law  common_law  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Gerald P. Bodet: Sir Edward Coke's Third Institutes: A Primer for Treason Defendants (1970)
JSTOR: The University of Toronto Law Journal, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Autumn, 1970), pp. 469-477 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  legal_history  political_history  commercial_law  James_I  Charles_I  treason  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Poole: Back to the Future? Unearthing the Theory of Common Law Constitutionalism(2003)
JSTOR: Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Autumn, 2003), pp. 435-454 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article charts the rise of a new, and increasingly influential, theory of public law: common law constitutionalism. The theory can best be seen as a response to a 'crisis' within contemporary public law thought produced by an array of different pressures: Thatcherite reformation of the state; the growing prominence (and potential politicization) of judicial review; constitutionalization of the EU; and trends towards globalization. The core of argument underlying the theory is elucidated by means of an analysis of the work of a number of leading public law scholars. The essence of the theory is the reconfiguration of public law as a species of constitutional politics centred on the common law court. The theory constitutes, it is suggested, an attempt to turn inwards, in the face of change, towards the familiar form of the common law, reinvigorated as a burgeoning site of normativity.
article  jstor  legal_history  commercial_law  constitutionalism  bibliography  common_law  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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