dunnettreader + colonialism   94

Anoush Fraser Terjanian, Associate Professor - Department of History - East Carolina University
Anoush F. Terjanian, Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought (Cambridge UP, © 2013) -- Co-editor. Book 17 of Raynal et. al., Histoire philosophique et politique du commerce et des établissements des européens dans les deux Indes, (1770, 1774, 1780), Ferney: Centre international d'étude du XVIIIe siècle, forthcoming 2016.
academia  18thC  French_history  French_Enlightenment  political_economy  colonialism  anticolonialism  philosophes  commerce-doux  luxury  virtue  politics-and-literature  political_discourse  economics-and-morality  economic_discourse  Histoire_des_Deux_Indes  intellectual_history  historiography-18thC  Montesquieu  Raynal  books 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Vasant Kaiwar - The Postcolonial Orient: The Politics of Difference and the Project of Provincialising Europe (2015) | Haymarket Books
ISBN: 9781608464791 -- In this far-reaching and insightful work, Vasant Kaiwar analyzes the political, economic, and ideological cross-currents that have shaped and informed postcolonial studies. Kaiwar mobilizes Marxism to demonstrate that subaltern studies is marred by orientalism, and that far richer understandings of ‘Europe’ not to mention ‘colonialism’, ‘modernity’ and ‘difference’ are possible without a postcolonialism captive to phenomenological-existentialism and post-structuralism. -- Vasant Kaiwar (Ph.D. UCLA, 1989), Visiting Associate Professor of History, Duke University; founder-editor, South Asia Bulletin and Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East; and co-editor, Antinomies of Modernity and From Orientalism to Postcolonialism.
books  global_history  colonialism  postcolonial  orientalism  capitalism  Marxism  social_theory  modernity  existentialism  poststructuralist 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paul Slack - Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England (2009)| JSTOR
Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England
Paul Slack
The Economic History Review
New Series, Vol. 62, No. 3 (Aug., 2009), pp. 576-603
Downloaded via iPhone to Sente
trade-policy  British_foreign_policy  17thC  British_Empire  inequality  article  agriculture  moral_economy  British_history  economic_growth  transport  downloaded  labor  trade  property_rights  progress  colonialism  mercantilism  ports  jstor  political_arithmetick  Sente  political_economy  improvement  economic_history  infrastructure 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Anthony Page - The Seventy Years War, 1744–1815, and Britain’s Fiscal-Naval State | War and Society, 34:3 (8 2015), pp. 162-186
Anthony.Page@utas.edu.au -- University of Tasmania -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/0729247315Z.00000000053 -- This article argues that we should view Britain as fighting a ‘Seventy Years War’ with France between the battles of Fontenoy in 1745 and Waterloo in 1815. Through years of hot and cold war, Britain struggled to build the military power needed to prevent it from falling under the domination of France. In hindsight, many view the British as inevitable imperialists, confidently building towards their global empire of the 19thC. In reality, 18thC Britons frequently fretted about the threat of invasion, military weakness, possible financial collapse, and potential revolution. Historical developments only look inevitable in hindsight and with the aid of the social sciences. The struggle to defend itself in Europe during the Seventy Years War saw Britain develop a ‘fiscal-naval state’ that built a global empire.
Keywords: Britain, ancien regime, warfare, eighteenth century.
article  paywall  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Navy  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-French  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  balance_of_power  fiscal-military_state  colonialism  imperialism  English_Channel  French_foreign_policy  French_army  French_Navy  French_Empire  blue_water_strategy  British_Empire-military  British_Army  Britain-invasion  Britain-Continent 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JAMES LIVESEY, review essay - Berkeley, Ireland and 18thC Intellectual History (Aug 2015) | Cambridge Journaks - Modern Intellectual History Modern Intellectual History - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY INTELLECTUAL HISTORY - Cambridge Journals O
Modern Intellectual History / Volume 12 / Issue 02 / August 2015, pp 453-473
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013) (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010) (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition
books  reviews  article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Berkeley  British_history  Three_Kingdoms  Church_of_England  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Atlantic  economic_history  financial_system  finance_capital  credit  Glorious_Revolution  colonialism  Protestant_Ascendancy 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Carina L. Johnson - Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 597-622 -- describes shifting descriptions across the 15thC-16thC of religious practices and how they were increasingly reported on, analyzed, and categorized, starting with Aristotle's and mutating -- in travel lit, reports from exploration, missionaries, colonization and aggregations in published works from ethnography to large scale "cosmographies" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  publishing  travel_lit  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  religious_belief  religious_practices  religious_imagery  idolatry  ethnography  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  civilization-concept  primitivism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Eacott - Selling Empire: India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600-1830 (2016) | UNC Press
Linking four continents over three centuries, Selling Empire demonstrates the centrality of India--both as an idea and a place--to the making of a global British imperial system. In the seventeenth century, Britain was economically, politically, and militarily weaker than India, but Britons increasingly made use of India’s strengths to build their own empire in both America and Asia. Early English colonial promoters first envisioned America as a potential India, hoping that the nascent Atlantic colonies could produce Asian raw materials. When this vision failed to materialize, Britain’s circulation of Indian manufactured goods--from umbrellas to cottons--to Africa, Europe, and America then established an empire of goods and the supposed good of empire. Eacott recasts the British empire's chronology and geography by situating the development of consumer culture, the American Revolution, and British industrialization in the commercial intersections linking the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. From the seventeenth into the nineteenth century and beyond, the evolving networks, ideas, and fashions that bound India, Britain, and America shaped persisting global structures of economic and cultural interdependence. -- Jonathan Eacott is associate professor of history at the University of California, Riverside.
books  economic_history  British_Empire  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  colonialism  settler_colonies  South_Asia  North_America  West_Indies  slavery-Africans  commerce  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  East_India_Company  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Noeleen McIlvenna - The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South | UNC Press
For twenty years in the eighteenth century, Georgia--the last British colony in what became the United States--enjoyed a brief period of free labor, where workers were not enslaved and were paid. The Trustees for the Establishment of the Colony of Georgia created a "Georgia experiment" of philanthropic enterprise and moral reform for poor white workers, though rebellious settlers were more interested in shaking off the British social system of deference to the upper class. Only a few elites in the colony actually desired the slave system, but those men, backed by expansionist South Carolina planters, used the laborers' demands for high wages as examples of societal unrest. Through a campaign of disinformation in London, they argued for slavery, eventually convincing the Trustees to abandon their experiment. In The Short Life of Free Georgia, Noeleen McIlvenna chronicles the years between 1732 and 1752 and challenges the conventional view that Georgia's colonial purpose was based on unworkable assumptions and utopian ideals. Rather, Georgia largely succeeded in its goals--until self-interested parties convinced England that Georgia had failed, leading to the colony's transformation into a replica of slaveholding South Carolina. -- Noeleen McIlvenna is associate professor of history at Wright State University and author of A Very Mutinous People
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  18thC  1730s  1740s  1750s  Georgia  colonialism  settler_colonies  slavery  labor_history  labor_standards  wages  Tories  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  planters  plantations  agriculture  hierarchy  elites  philanthropy  political_culture  economic_culture  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark G. Hanna - Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740 (Nov 2015) | UNC Press
Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England's burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns. English piracy and unregulated privateering flourished in the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean because of merchant elites' active support in the North American colonies. Sea marauders represented a real as well as a symbolic challenge to legal and commercial policies formulated by distant and ineffectual administrative bodies that undermined the financial prosperity and defense of the colonies. Departing from previous understandings of deep-sea marauding, this study reveals the full scope of pirates' activities in relation to the landed communities that they serviced and their impact on patterns of development that formed early America and the British Empire. -- Mark G. Hanna is associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. -- cover is the portrait of the Earl of Warwick
books  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  West_Indies  North_America  Atlantic  colonialism  privateers  piracy  economic_history  maritime_history  settler_colonies  commerce  trade  Navigation_Acts  Board_of_Trade  East_India_Company  Indian_Ocean  Pacific  ports  maritime_law  commercial_law  Warwick_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Liam Hogan - The Myth of “Irish Slaves” in the Colonies (2015) | - Academia.edu
Recent years have seen the marked growth of the “Irish slaves” narrative, which is itself a subset of the “white slavery” myth. This myth has always existed in ultranationalist and white supremacist circles, and their promotion of it frequently occurs on social media. The myth has recently gone viral, partly due to the decision by popular newspapers and websites to endorse a spurious “Irish Slave Trade” article that conflates indentured servitude or forced labour with chattel slavery. Surprisingly, this claim has gone relatively unchallenged in the public domain, thus this paper will analyse its veracity. -- Research Interests: Irish Studies, Mythology, Slavery, Nationalism, History of Slavery, and 3 more -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  Ireland-English_exploitation  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  colonialism  legal_history  slavery-Africans  slavery  slavery-law  property  Irish_migration  Ireland  racism  social_history  status  plantations  planters  national_tale  nationalism  white_supremacy  US_politics  US_politics-race  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jenny Shaw - Everyday Life in the Early English Caribbean: Irish, Africans, and the Construction of Difference (2013) | UGA Press
Set along both the physical and social margins of the British Empire in the second half of the 17thC, ...explores the construction of difference through the everyday life of colonial subjects. Shaw examines how marginalized colonial subjects — Irish and Africans — contributed to these processes. By emphasizing their everyday experiences Shaw makes clear that each group persisted in its own cultural practices; Irish and Africans also worked within — and challenged—the limits of the colonial regime. Shaw’s research demonstrates the extent to which hierarchies were in flux in the early modern Caribbean, allowing even an outcast servant to rise to the position of island planter, and underscores the fallacy that racial categories of black and white were the sole arbiters of difference in the early English Caribbean. The everyday lives of Irish and Africans are obscured by sources constructed by elites. Through her research, Shaw overcomes the constraints such sources impose by pushing methodological boundaries to fill in the gaps, silences, and absences that dominate the historical record. By examining legal statutes, census material, plantation records, travel narratives, depositions, interrogations, and official colonial correspondence, as much for what they omit as for what they include, Everyday Life in the Early English Caribbean uncovers perspectives that would otherwise remain obscured. This book encourages readers to rethink the boundaries of historical research and writing and to think more expansively about questions of race and difference in English slave societies.
books  kindle-available  17thC  British_history  British_Empire  West_Indies  colonialism  Irish_migration  indentured_labor  slavery  slavery-Africans  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  social_history  hierarchy  elite_culture  historiography  race 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
The Evolution of Phylogenetic Systematics - Edited by Andrew Hamilton - E-Book - University of California Press
.. aims to make sense of the rise of phylogenetic systematics—its methods, its objects of study, and its theoretical foundations—with contributions from historians, philosophers, and biologists. (...) an intellectual agenda for the study of systematics and taxonomy in a way that connects classification with larger historical themes in the biological sciences, including morphology, experimental and observational approaches, evolution, biogeography, debates over form and function, character transformation, development, and biodiversity. It aims to provide frameworks for answering the question: how did systematics become phylogenetic? -- the 1st Chapter excerpt is a fabulous history of "waves" of new species identification of primarily mammals tied to intellectual, social, economic, cultural and geopolitical history -- his case study is the shift to N American museums organizing large numbers of surveys collecting many samples that gave data on varieties within same species, varying ecologies, etc in the "inner frontiers" in the late19thC and early 20thC -- possible due to "the logic of capital" (railroads penetrating regions to foreclose competition, land speculators), curators leaving the city to obtain materials for the fashion in diaoramas, patronage newly attracted, white collar middle class embracing self-improvement via nature study on holiday, new conservationist attitudes toward Nature etc.
books  kindle-available  biology  taxonomies  species  natural_history  evolutionary_biology  phylogenetics  history_of_science  18thC  19thC  20thC  public_sphere  science-public  cultural_history  cultural_change  material_culture  frontier  leisure  exploration  colonialism  imperialism  museums  collections  virtuosos  scientific_culture  nature  nature-mastery  conservation  self-development 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Emily Erikson : Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600–1757 | Princeton University Press
The EIF was one of the most powerful and enduring organizations in history. "Between Monopoly and Free Trade" locates the source of that success in the innovative policy by which the Court of Directors granted employees the right to pursue their own commercial interests while in the firm’s employ. Exploring trade network dynamics, decision-making processes, and ports and organizational context, Emily Erikson demonstrates why the EIC was a dominant force in the expansion of trade between Europe and Asia, and she sheds light on the related problems of why England experienced rapid economic development and how the relationship between Europe and Asia shifted in the 18thC and 19thC.(..) Building on the organizational infrastructure of the Company and the sophisticated commercial institutions of the markets of the East, employees constructed a cohesive internal network of peer communications that directed English trading ships during their voyages. This network integrated Company operations, encouraged innovation, and increased the Company’s flexibility, adaptability, and responsiveness to local circumstance. -- assistant professor in the department of sociology and the school of management (by courtesy) at Yale University, as well as a member of the Council of South Asian Studies. -- excerpt Chapter 1 downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  buy  economic_history  business_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  colonialism  imperialism  networks-business  networks-political  networks-information  networks-social  India  Indian_Ocean  Central_Asia  Chinese_history  China-international_relations  monopolies  trading_companies  trading_privileges  VOC  East_India_Company  trade  trade_finance  shipping  ports  British_Navy  business-and-politics  business_practices  business_influence  business-norms  nabobs  MPs  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  entrepreneurs  organizations  firms-structure  firms-organization  consumer_revolution  exports  Navigation_Acts  Anglo-Dutch_wars  French_foreign_policy  competition-interstate  risk-mitigation  risk_management  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pierre Nora - Recent history and the new dangers of politicization - Eurozine - Nov 2011
History versus politics is today's conflict, and the word "politics" covers both memory and ideology. This antagonistic pair has replaced those that have successively occupied the stage that is the discipline of history: erudition versus philosophy, science versus literature, structure versus event, problem versus account. However, the antagonism of history and politics goes much further than its predecessors, because it involves not only how history is carried out but the place and role of history in our modern urban life. That place and role have become problematic and are characterized by a profound contradiction.The very foundations of the profession of the historian have changed. Historians are no longer part of or borne by the historical continuity for which they used to be both agents and guarantors. They have lost their certainties and magisterial status. On the other hand, as interpreters and experts in social demand, as a bulwark against political and public pressure, they are more necessary than ever. -- translation of Pierre Nora's closing address to the conference Rendez-Vous de l'Histoire in Blois, 13-16 October 2011 first published in Eurozine -- downloaded pdf to Note
historiography  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-state  lieux_de_mémoires  collective_memory  memory-cultural  memory-group  colonialism  post-colonial  France  French_Empire  French_government  epistemology-history  ideology  culture_wars  cultural_authority  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
John Quiggin - John Locke Against Freedom | Jacobin - June 2015
For classical liberals (often called libertarians in the US context), the founding documents of liberalism are John Locke’s Second Treatise on Government and… (.. conclusion) Received ideas change only slowly, and the standard view of Locke as a defender of liberty is likely to persist for years to come. Still, the reassessment is underway, and the outcome is inevitable. Locke was a theoretical advocate of, and a personal participant in, expropriation and enslavement. His classical liberalism offers no guarantee of freedom to anyone except owners of capitalist private property.
Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  US_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  tolerance  property  property_rights  Native_Americans  slavery  American_colonies  Founders  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberty  liberty-negative  political_culture  Board_of_Trade  colonialism  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Hoffman, P.T.: Why Did Europe Conquer the World? (eBook and Hardcover).
Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84% of the globe. But why did Europe rise to the top, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? Why didn’t these powers establish global dominance? ...distinguished economic historian Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations— eg geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if variables had been at all different, Europe would not have achieved critical military innovations, and another power could have become master of the world. In vivid detail, he sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development and military rivalry. Compared to their counterparts in China, Japan, South Asia, and the Middle East, European leaders—whether chiefs, lords, kings, emperors, or prime ministers—had radically different incentives, which drove them to make war. These incentives, which Hoffman explores using an economic model of political costs and financial resources, resulted in astonishingly rapid growth in Europe’s military sector from the Middle Ages on, and produced an insurmountable lead in gunpowder technology. The consequences determined which states established colonial empires or ran the slave trade, and even which economies were the first to industrialize. -- Professor of Business Economics and professor of history at CalTech. His books include Growth in a Traditional Society (PUP), Surviving Large Losses, and Priceless Markets. -- ebook and pbk not yet released --text 200 pgs, data, mideks in appendices ~35 pgs -- downloaded 1st chapter excerpt
books  kindle-available  Great_Divergence  economic_history  political_history  political_culture  military_history  technology  gunpowder  colonialism  imperialism  Europe  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  incentives  wars-causes  war  Innovation  technology-adoption  historical_sociology  historical_change  balance_of_power  path-dependency  Tilly  Mann_Michael  state-building  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Conway - ‘Founded in Lasting Interests’: British Projects for European Imperial Collaboration in the Age of the American Revolution (2015) | The International History Review - Volume 37, Issue 1 - T&A Online
This article examines various British proposals for co-operation with other European imperial powers to counter the rebellion of the American colonies or curb the pretentions of the new United States. Historians have paid little attention to these projects, mainly because none of them eventuated in the co-operation their authors envisaged. But their lack of success is not a reason to dismiss them as unimportant; their failure reveals much about British attitudes at the time. -- Keywords - European imperial co-operation, American Revolution, eighteenth century
article  paywall  18thC  diplomatic_history  American_Revolution  British_history  British_foreign_policy  colonialism  France  French_foreign_policy  French_Empire  Spain  Spanish_Empire  North_America 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Joseph Adelson, review essay - What Caused Capitalism? | Foreign Affairs - May 2015
Once upon a time, smart people thought the world was flat. As globalization took off, economists pointed to spreading market forces that… Includes new Cambridge History of Capitalism, Mokyr Enlightened Economy, Acemoglu and Robinson Why Nations Fail, and Beckert Empire of Cotton -- contrasts tales that are, in broad brush, optimistic and internalist re origins (especially Mokyr) vs pessimistic and externalist (especially Cotton) -- copied to Instapaper
books  reviews  bookshelf  economic_history  capitalism  Great_Divergence  ancient_history  global_economy  global_history  global_system  Europe-Early_Modern  city_states  Italy  Spain  France  British_history  India  US_history  colonialism  imperialism  empires  institutional_economics  technology  development  Scientific_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  industrial_policy  US_Civil_War  slavery  property  property_rights  mercantilism  mercantilism-violence  Instapaper  markets  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter K. J. Park - Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon 1780-1830 | SUNY Pess 2013
... a penetrating account of a crucial period in the development of philosophy as an academic discipline. (..) a number of European philosophers influenced by Kant began to formulate the history of philosophy as a march of progress from the Greeks to Kant—(..) supplanted existing accounts beginning in Egypt or W. Asia at a time when European interest in Sanskrit and Persian lit was flourishing. Not without debate, these traditions were ultimately deemed outside the scope of philosophy and relegated to the study of religion. Park uncovers this debate and recounts the development of an exclusionary canon of philosophy in the decades of the late 18thC and early 19thC. To what extent was this exclusion of Africa and Asia a result of the scientization of philosophy? To what extent was it a result of racism? (..)the most extensive description available of Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie, F. Schlegel’s lectures on the history of philosophy, Ast’s and Rixner’s systematic integration of Africa and Asia into the history of philosophy, and the controversy between Hegel and the theologian Tholuck over “pantheism.” 1. The Kantian School and the Consolidation of Modern Historiography of Philosophy -- 2. The Birth of Comparative History of Philosophy: Joseph-Marie de Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie -- 3. India in Friedrich Schlegel’s Comparative History of Philosophy -- 4. The Exclusion of Africa and Asia from the History of Philosophy: The Formation of the Kantian Position -- 5. Systematic Inclusion of Africa and Asia under Absolute Idealism: Friedrich Ast’s and Thaddä Anselm Rixner’s Histories of Philosophy -- 6. Absolute Idealism Reverts to the Kantian Position: Hegel’s Exclusion of Africa and Asia -- 7. The Comparative History of Philosophy in August Tholuck’s Polemic against Hegel -- downloaded excerpt
books  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_India  Sanskrit  Persia  religious_history  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  Kant  Schlegel  German_Idealism  Hegel  German_scholarship  philohellenism  ancient_history  ancient_religions  history_of_science  biology  racism  Africa  Asia  Enlightenment  comparative_religion  pantheism  philology  teleology  cosmopolitanism  colonialism  comparative_history  comparative_anthropology  philosophical_anthropology  human_nature  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Avidly / Dana Luciano - The Inhuman Anthropocene | LA Review of Books Blog - March 2015
Recently, a study appeared in the journal Nature proposing a previously unsuggested start date for the Anthropocene: 1610 CE. -- It was chosen because it was the lowest point in a decades-long decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide, measurable by traces found in Artic ice cores. The change in the atmosphere, Lewis and Maslin deduced, was caused by the death of over 50 million indigenous residents of the Americas in the first century after European contact, the result of “exposure to diseases carried by Europeans, plus war, enslavement and famine”. The destruction of the indigenous population (leaving only an estimated 6 million survivors on both northern and southern American continents by the mid-17thC) meant a significant decline in farming, fire-burning and other human activities affecting atmospheric carbon levels. Lewis and Maslin point to other geologically significant aspects of Euro-American contact as well, including the transfer of plant and animal species between Europe and the Americas, leading to a significant loss of biodiversity and acceleration of species extinction rates. From this view, the Anthropocene develops alongside the global pathways of modernity. Lewis and Maslin term this proposal the “Orbis hypothesis,” from the Latin for “globe.” -- copied to Pocket -- chart of the classification of Earth history by the International association of stratographists downloaded to complexity and emergence etc Gintis folder
Anthropocene  geology  climate  biology  botany  natural_history  colonialism  Native_Americans  genocide  extinction  Pocket 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Antoine Lilti, Céline Spector, eds. - Penser l’Europe au XVIIIe siècle: commerce, civilisation, empire | Voltaire Foundation - October 2014
Volume: SVEC 2014:10, Series editor: Jonathan Mallinson -- Price: £60 / €76 / $94 -- ISBN-13: 978-0-7294-1148-6 -- Description: Au XXIe siècle, l’Europe ne fait plus rêver: son modèle est contesté, tant sur le plan économique qu’intellectuel et politique. Face à ces désillusions, il est urgent d’interroger les origines de l’idée d’Europe: quand et comment la notion d’Europe s’est-elle définie? L’ouvrage dirigé par Antoine Lilti et Céline Spector propose un détour par les Lumières. Si l’Europe peut s’enorgueillir d’une longue histoire, c’est bien au XVIIIe siècle qu’elle est devenue un enjeu philosophique, historique et politique majeur. De Montesquieu à Kant, de Voltaire à Burke ou à Robertson, l’idée d’Europe est au cœur des controverses sur le droit international comme sur l’économie politique, sur la légitimité de l’expansion coloniale comme sur les espoirs d’un monde pacifié. Véritable enquête collective conduite par des historiens et des philosophes, Penser l’Europe au XVIIIe siècle aborde trois éléments majeurs autour desquels gravite le concept naissant d’Europe: l’empire, le commerce et la civilisation. Après avoir décrit la manière dont l’ordre européen a été conçu, les auteurs examinent la question de l’expansion commerciale et coloniale de l’Europe, ainsi que les théories de la civilisation, qui permettent d’interroger le statut de l’exceptionnalisme européen. Le siècle des Lumières ne nous présente pas un idéal européen à ressusciter, mais un champ d’interrogations dont nous ne sommes jamais véritablement sortis. -- see Pocket for full ToC and contributors
books  libraries  Europe  18thC  Enlightenment  colonialism  commerce-doux  international_law  international_political_economy  balance_of_power  competition-interstate  perpetual_peace  historiography-18thC  cultural_critique  imperialism-critique  Montesquieu  Kant  Voltaire  Burke  Robertson  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  civility-political  politeness  civilizing_process  Europe-exceptionalism 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeff Horn - Economic Development in Early Modern France: The Privilege of Liberty, 1650–1820 (release date for hardback mid-Feb 2015) | European history after 1450 | Cambridge University Press
Privilege has long been understood as the constitutional basis of Ancien Régime France, legalising the provision of a variety of rights, powers and exemptions to some, whilst denying them to others. In this fascinating new study however, Jeff Horn reveals that Bourbon officials utilized privilege as an instrument of economic development, freeing some sectors of the economy from pre-existing privileges and regulations, while protecting others. He explores both government policies and the innovations of entrepreneurs, workers, inventors and customers to uncover the lived experience of economic development from the Fronde to the Restoration. He shows how, influenced by Enlightenment thought, the regime increasingly resorted to concepts of liberty to defend privilege as a policy tool. The book offers important new insights into debates about the impact of privilege on early industrialisation, comparative economic development and the outbreak of the French Revolution. **--** 1. Introduction: profits and economic development during the Old Régime *--* 2. Privileged enclaves and the guilds: liberty and regulation *--* 3. The privilege of liberty put to the test: industrial development in Normandy *--* 4. Companies, colonies, and contraband: commercial privileges under the Old Régime *--* 5. Privilege, liberty, and managing the market: trading with the Levant *--* 6. Outside the body politic, essential to the body economic: the privileges of Jews, Protestants and foreign residents *--* 7. Privilege, innovation, and the state: entrepreneurialism and the lessons of the Old Régime *--* 8. The reign of liberty? Privilege after 1789 -- look for pdf of Intro once released
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  privileges-corporate  economic_culture  economic_policy  development  monarchy  profit  entrepreneurs  guilds  trading_companies  trade-policy  regulation  industrialization  industrial_policy  Colbert  Colbertism  urban_development  urban_elites  commerce  commercial_interest  French_government  Huguenots  Jews  colonialism  French_Empire  colonies  corporate_finance  monopolies  Levant  MENA  Ottomans  liberties  liberty  Ancien_régime  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  haute_bourgeoisie  markets  markets-structure  foreign_trade  foreign_policy  foreigners-resident 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Lorena S. Walsh, review - Nuala Zahedieh, The Capital and the Colonies: London and the Atlantic Economy, 1660-1700 (2010) | EH.net Review - Feb 2011
Zahedieh finds increasing concentration of plantation commerce among large merchants specializing in particular commodities and regions in the 1680s, when falling commodity prices and increased taxes eroded profit margins and drove out small traders. Colonial merchants seldom invested in overseas property, but made a massive contribution to expansion of empire in the form of short-term credit extended to settlers. The larger operators accumulated enough capital to diversify investment into shipbuilding, slave-trading, joint-stocks, insurance, wharves, industry, landed property, loans, and public credit. This decade was a turning point, as merchant concentration and specialization led to improved productivity, economies of scale, and reduced costs. (..) attempts of the later Stuarts to corner the profits of empire by restricting free trade among Englishmen as having limited success. (..) she sees the effect of the Glorious Revolution, not as leading to an economically optimal political arrangement, but as consolidating the capacity of the transatlantic trading elite to enforce regulation in its own interests and enhance the value and scale of rent-seeking enterprises at the expense of competition and efficiency, leading to a period of slower growth in colonial trade and shipping at the end of the century. Unlike trade with Europe, colonial commerce required an unusually large fixed capital investment in the greater tonnage needed to transport large volumes of bulky goods over long distances. (..) English- and plantation-built ships were better suited to most colonial commerce than were Dutch (..) it was long-distance commerce, rather than the protection of the Navigation Acts, that revived the English shipbuilding industry. By 1700 plantation shipping accounted for 40% of London's overseas trading capacity. (..) increased education among mariners (..) managerial skills, (..) navigational instruments. (..) London's prosperity by stimulating the construction of wharfs and warehouses, (.) naval refitting, repair, and provisioning trades. Although technology and unit input costs were fairly stable across the period, increased volumes and growing experience with colonial conditions led to organizational improvements which made more efficient use of inputs. - page encoding a mess on Note - try to save page or copy to EF in Air
books  bookshelf  reviews  17thC  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  London  colonialism  North-Weingast  American_colonies  West_Indies  trade  trade-policy  shipping  Navigation_Acts  1680s  1690s  entrepôts  economic_growth  economic_culture  Charles_II  James_II  Atlantic  capital  investment  trade_finance  Dutch  education-training  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City_politics  infrastructure  ports  technology  navigation  interlopers  regulatory_capture  commodities  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic: Can Black Death explain the Industrial Revolution? | globalinequality - Jan 11 2015
re presentation by a young scholar at Santa Fe suggesting that Why England (and Dutch) due to higher wages in Northern Europe post Black Death in contrast with South where non market repression or property arrangements were able to push adjustment costs inti agricultural workers without impact on wage rates. Milanovic compares with other theoretical approaches ie Pomerantz, Acemoglu & Robinson, Robert Allen etc. Link to 2007 paper by Pamuk Milanovic thinks may be 1st work to seriously look at differential impact of Black Death on northern & southern Europe as distinct from the common story if Western vs Central and Eastern Europe.
economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  Black_Death  North-Weingast  landowners  demography  economic_sociology  labor  agriculture  wages  productivity  colonialism  medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  institutional_economics  capital  capitalism  China  Japan  ancient_Rome  slavery  bibliography 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Amanda Vickery - Those Gorgeous Georgians - Tercentenary Review | academia.edu
Downloaded docx to iPhone -- We tend to associate the Georgian era with glacial calm, tinkling tea cups, and whispering silk dresses, an oasis of elegance and calm between the strife of the Civil War and the grime and class struggle of the Victorians. But this is a pallid Sunday teatime vision of the eighteenth century. Th... - published as article in The Telegraph(?)
paper  academia  downloaded  memory-cultural  cultural_history  social_history  British_history  English_lit  art_history  music_history  elite_culture  court_culture  18thC  19thC  monarchy  change-social  historiography  politeness  public_opinion  popular_culture  consumers  urbanism  social_order  crime  fiscal-military_state  colonialism  trade  status  hierarchy  religious_history 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Ron Harris - (pdf) The Institutional Dynamics of Early Modern Eurasian Trade: The Commenda and the Corporation
The focus of this article is on legal-economic institutions that organized early- modern Eurasian trade. It identifies two such institutions that had divergent dispersion patterns, the corporation and the commenda. The corporation ended up as a uniquely European institution that did not migrate until the era of European colonization. The commenda that originated in Arabia migrated all the way to Western Europe and to China. The article explains their divergent dispersion based on differences in their institutional and geographical environments and on dynamic factors. It claims that institutional analysis errs when it ignores migration of institutions. It provides building blocks for the modeling of institutional migration. -- via Dick Langlois at organizationsandmarkets.com presented at Nov 2014 conference put together by Business History program at Harvard Business School, on the History of Law and Business Enterprise -- downloaded to iPhone
paper  downloaded  economic_history  institutional_economics  legal_history  medieval_history  firms-structure  firms-theory  trade  colonialism  Europe-Early_Modern  China  India  MENA  Islamic_law  business_practices  risk_management  economic_culture  cultural_influence  trade-cultural_transmission  corporate_law  business_history  comparative_economics  Eurasia  business  organizations 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reformation in Global Perspective
Abstract Concepts and methods introduced by the “new world history” present important opportunities to contextualize the European Reformation in transregional frames of reference. A global approach allows historians to situate the Reformation more fully within the orbit of people, ideas, and cultural goods that interacted with one another across the early modern world. A number of historians who study missionary encounters, especially those of Jesuits, have already initiated global methodologies in analyzing the Reformation overseas. Other scholars have pointed to ways in which an engagement with the wider world influenced European societies. These works indicate the rich possibilities for looking at the Reformation with new eyes. In assessing this scholarship, this article discusses the prospects and challenges for adopting global perspectives in the study of the Reformation.
religious_history  missionaries  cultural_history  latin  america  article  16thc  east  asia  historiography  china  reformation  catholics  africa  colonialism  world  history  counter-reformation  17thc  north  protestants  india  mena  paywall  cross-border 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Woolf, review - Ken MacMillan, Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World: The Legal Foundations of Empire, 1576-1640 (2006) | JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 598-600
Cambridge University Press -- Looks well done - Woolf gives high marks for linking the interest of various players, including monarchs, with shifting ideologies and challenges of articulating a legal system that made sense with English ambitions, relations with other European colonial enterprises, and England's peculiar legal framework and its interactions with government - e.g. why the most elaborated jurisprudence, the Spanish, didn't fit with Fortescue commonwealth style thought and ticklish question of "conquest" -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  political_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  international_law  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  colonialism  British_politics  British_history  trading_companies  balance_of_power  maritime_history  common_law  Roman_law  dominion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Srinivas Aravamudan - Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel (2011) 360 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
A MUST BUY -- Srinivas Aravamudan here reveals how Oriental tales, pseudo-ethnographies, sexual fantasies, and political satires took Europe by storm during the eighteenth century. Naming this body of fiction Enlightenment Orientalism, he poses a range of urgent questions that uncovers the interdependence of Oriental tales and domestic fiction, thereby challenging standard scholarly narratives about the rise of the novel. More than mere exoticism, Oriental tales fascinated ordinary readers as well as intellectuals, taking the fancy of philosophers such as Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Diderot in France, and writers such as Defoe, Swift, and Goldsmith in Britain. Aravamudan shows that Enlightenment Orientalism was a significant movement that criticized irrational European practices even while sympathetically bridging differences among civilizations. A sophisticated reinterpretation of the history of the novel, Enlightenment Orientalism is sure to be welcomed as a landmark work in eighteenth-century studies.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  fiction  novels  lit_crit  literary_theory  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_lit  orientalism  Defoe  Swift  Voltaire  Diderot  Montesquieu  Behn  Manley  Montagu_Lady_Mary  realism  empiricism  moral_philosophy  self  subjectivity  self-examination  self-and-other  self-knowledge  travel  romances  satire  utopian  exploration  cultural_critique  Biblical_criticism  philology  antiquaries  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  chronology  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  xenophobia  national_ID  racialism  colonialism  imperialism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 9 (Letters and Misc. Works) - Online Library of Liberty
Letters in Latin reflecting correspondence in Republic of Letters; miscellaneous writings on topics he was interested in, including viticulture for the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, a history of navigation, and his book collection Of particular interest, a collection published in 1719 - A COLLECTION OF SEVERAL PIECES OF Mr. JOHN LOCKE. published by Mr. DESMAIZEAUX, under the direction of ANTHONY COLLINS, Esq. *-* THE character of Mr. Locke, by Mr. Peter Coste. *-* The fundamental constitutions of Carolina. *-* A letter from a person of quality to his friend in the country; giving an account of the debates and resolutions of the house of lords, in April and May 1675, concerning a bill, intitled, “An act to prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the government.” *-* Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s opinion of “our seeing all things in God.” *-* A letter to Mr. Oldenburg, secretary to the Royal Society. *-* Letters to Anthony Collins, Esq. *-* A letter to * * * on Dr. Pococke. *-* Letters to the Rev. Mr. Richard King. *-* Rules of a society which met once a week, for their improvement in useful knowledge, and for the promoting of truth and christian charity --- in Vol 2 of this edition, Elements of natural philosophy. *-* Some thoughts concerning reading and study for a gentleman. -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  natural_philosophy  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  American_colonies  Carolina  constitutions  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  Collins_Anthony  Malebranche  ideas-theories  Whigs  Charles_II  James_II  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  maritime_history  epistemology  free-thinkers  House_of_Lords  opposition 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
books  etexts  reference  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  exploration  colonialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  France  Germany  Italy  Spain  Spanish_Empire  British_Empire  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Netherlands  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Denmark  Sweden  Russia  Poland  Ottomans  commerce  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  Louis_XIV  military_history  political_culture  political_history  politics-and-religion  art_history  religious_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: John Locke on Property (January, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Eric Mack discusses John Locke’s theory of property to which Jan Narveson, Peter Vallentyne, and Michael Zuckert respond in a series of essays and comments. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  social_contract  natural_law  natural_rights  state-of-nature  labor  landowners  landed_interest  lower_orders  reformation_of_manners  mass_culture  political_participation  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  public_goods  Native_Americans  colonialism  development  common_good  commons  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters: Hugo Grotius on War and the State (March 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Fernando R. Tesón, a professor at Florida State University College of Law, explores what Grotius thought about the proper relationship between the laws of nature and the laws of nations, what limits (if any) can be legitimately and rightly placed on the conduct of states engaged in war, and what relevance his insights may have today. Responding to his essay are Hans W. Blom, Paul Carrese, and Eric Mack. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  international_law  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  property_rights  just_war  navigation  trade  colonialism  war  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  VOC  commercial_law  state-of-nature  consent  legitimacy  social_contract  sociability  self-interest  self-defense  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea (Hakluyt trans.) with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea, trans. Richard Hakluyt, with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/859> -- Grotius’s influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing in Richard Hakluyt’s translation. The book also contains William Welwod’s critque and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  international_political_economy  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  maritime_history  exploration  trade  trading_companies  colonialism  piracy  shipping  Dutch  British_history  British_Empire  fishing  free_trade  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  colonialism  British_Empire  Anglo-American  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  property  property_rights  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  natural_law  human_nature  Founders  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  Burke  Madison  Hume  Scottish_Enlightenment  commerce  luxury  commerce-doux  corruption  tyranny  Absolutism  US_constitution  American_Revolution  UK_government-colonies  partisanship  common_good  common_law  Whigs  democracy  political_participation  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Tillman W. Nechtman, review - Penelope Carson, The East India Company and Religion, 1698-1858 | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. June, 2013
-- nuanced way in which her focus on faith forces us to appreciate the religious balancing act that was always at the heart of company rule in South Asia. Axiomatic though it may be that the company struggled to balance missionary work against its trading functions, The East India Company and Religion is richest in its insistence that historians have overly homogenized what we mean when we refer to missionary activity. Take, for instance, the competing interests of the Church of England and other dissenting religious communities. Ought the company’s missionary involvement in South Asia focus on the established church? Or, ought it be more inclusive? Would Anglican missionaries threaten indigenous religious sensibilities as being aggressively statist? Hence, as Carson suggests, the question of how the company functioned in India vis-à-vis religion was always also a question of the constitution of church and state in Britain more broadly and of the religious composition of the state and the company’s growing empires around the globe. -- Carson notes how little changed with respect to religious policy after the crown replaced the company as the sovereign power in South Asia. Queen Victoria’s clear unwillingness to impose upon the religious convictions of her South Asian subjects--in clear defiance of the will of Britain’s Evangelical community--was a reaffirmation of the company’s religious compact with the people of India.
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  19thC  religious_history  British_history  British_Empire  British_politics  India  East_India_Company  missionaries  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  Evangelical  Hinduism  Islam  colonialism  Victorian  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Audrey Horning, Ireland in the Virginian Sea: British colonialism in the Atlantic (2013) | UNC Press -
In the late 16thC, the English started expanding westward, establishing control over parts of neighboring Ireland as well as exploring and later colonizing distant North America. Audrey Horning deftly examines the relationship between British colonization efforts in both locales, depicting their close interconnection as fields for colonial experimentation. Focusing on the Ulster Plantation in the north of Ireland and the Jamestown settlement in the Chesapeake, she challenges the notion that Ireland merely served as a testing ground for British expansion into North America. Horning instead analyzes the people, financial networks, and information that circulated through and connected English plantations on either side of the Atlantic. In addition, Horning explores English colonialism from the perspective of the Gaelic Irish and Algonquian societies and traces the political and material impact of contact. The focus on the material culture of both locales yields a textured specificity to the complex relationships between natives and newcomers while exposing the lack of a determining vision or organization in early English colonial projects. -- She is professor of archaeology and director of research for Past Cultural Change at Queen's University Belfast. This is her fifth book.
books  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  American_colonies  Ireland  colonialism  networks-business  networks-information  plantations  Irish-Gaelic  Native_Americans 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Junto March Madness: The Bracket Is Here! - favorite American history books « The Junto March 2014
The response to yesterday’s call for nominations was overwhelming, with over 150 books receiving nominations, and over half of those receiving more than one mention. As such, The Junto’s Selection Committee had a difficult task whittling down the nominees to a bracket of 64, and an even tougher time organizing it into something resembling the NCAA tournament.
books  US_history  US_politics  colonialism  Early_Republic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  17thC  18thC  19thC  social_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  political_culture  political_history  religious_history  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard W. Unger, review - Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude, The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), pp. 239-241
Reviewed work(s): The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815. By Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xx+767. $89.95. -- Richard W. Unger, University of British Columbia -- The final sixty pages do serve to draw together what has gone before and offer not only an overview of economic and social developments but also a tentative theory about patterns of the rise and fall of modern economies. The authors launch a sustained attack on traditional periodization of economic and, indeed, all history. They find in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century many of the features of nineteenth- and twentieth-century economic growth. They see no reason to look on the English Industrial Revolution as a cataclysmic event. -- There seems to be no doubt that the massive debt run up by the Dutch government in fending off the French threat from 1672 to 1713 burdened the economy so much that it could neither recover earlier levels of growth nor engage in restructuring like that which occurred in the years from 1660 to 1700 in the face of falling food prices, rising real incomes of laborers and craftsmen, and declining land values. Too many people in the eighteenth century—such as government officials and bondholders—lived well thanks to the need to service the debt; these people resisted necessary fiscal reform.
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Dutch  development  modernization  urbanization  agriculture  industry  Industrial_Revolution  foreign_policy  sovereign_debt  rentiers  trading_companies  trade  colonialism  shipping  entrepôts  periodization  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vicki Hsueh - Giving Orders: Theory and Practice in the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 63, No. 3 (Jul., 2002), pp. 425-446
In reading Locke and political discourse of liberal constitutionalism based on Locke's Two Treatises, mistake to conflate Carolina Constitutions with the Two Treatises as evidence of exclusion and assimilation policies from outset. Locke was not sole author, the audience and purposes were different, the scheme is Harrington republicanism, and measures for negotiation, adaptation and other more inclusionary but non assimilationist measures were contemplated. So don't read back contemporary unitary vision of liberal constitutionalism into origins. Uses political imaginary congruent and incongruent with lived experience as theme -- useful bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  colonialism  British_Empire  Carolina  Locke  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  Harrington  nobility  rank  property  development  plantations  Native_Americans  liberalism  constitutionalism  assimilation  classes  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 495-522
This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to "absolute power" in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory--or vice versa. This creates hermeneutical problems and raises charges of racism. If Locke deserves the epithet "racist," it is not for his having a racial doctrine justifying slavery. None of this makes for a flattering portrait. Locke's reputation as the champion of liberty would not survive the contradictions in which new world slavery ensnared him. Evidence for this may be found in Locke's reception, including by Southern apologists for slavery.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  17thC  British_history  colonialism  American_colonies  West_Indies  indigenous_peoples  Native_Americans  Africa  slavery  Locke  Grotius  natural_law  just_war  conquest  liberty  individualism  liberalism  Southern_states  abolition  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - Exploding England: The Dialectics of Mobility and Settlement in Early Modern England | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 1-16
Movement, change, uncertainty and unpredictability, the most obvious characteristics of English life between the Reformation and the execution of Charles Stuart, have been lost in the recent historiography of early modern England. From a post-colonial perspective, it is obvious that something very dramatic must have happened to turn three million English speakers into six hundred million and convert entire cultures to English ways of organising and thinking. Viewed from the colonies, England exploded during this period, and continued to explode for at least 350 years. Something very revolutionary must have been going on in England to make this happen. This paper explores the dialectics of movement and settlement in early modern England for signs of contradiction. -- impact on doing social history of postmodernism on thinking about geography, territory, "governmentality" reflected in archives that doesn't match lived experience, post-colonial insights -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  historiography  postmodern  postcolonial  social_theory  geography  territory  migration  social_mobility  political_economy  middle_class  peasants  labor  agriculture  gentry  colonialism  British_Empire  demography  emigration  population  urbanization  British_history  16thC  17thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas - DEBATING EMPIRES, INVENTING EMPIRES: British Territorial Claims Against the Spaniards in America, 1670—1714 | JSTOR: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Vol. 10, No. 1 (SPRING/SUMMER 2010), pp. 142-168
This essay analyzes the Spanish-British political debate over the right to fell logwood and for the dominion of the Yucatan. It contextualizes archival material as well as printed treatises written by Britons who were engaged in the debate and who gave origin to the ideology of the British Empire before the Union (1707). These writers were members of the Council of Trade and Plantations and of the Royal Society, and they had not only domestic interests but also direct private interests either in the West or the East Indies. John Locke is the main figure in this debate and his concept of property is revised within this new context. Locke and other fellows of the Royal Society and King's councilors argued in favor of British possession of American lands claimed by Spain. Using natural law and political and theological arguments to claim that Spain was unable to improve nature, they described the Spanish as a declining and backward empire and created a successful imperial ideology to bring domestic homogeneity and stability in turbulent times. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  Anglo-Spanish  Spanish_Empire  Atlantic  Royal_Society  Board_of_Trade  Locke  natural_law  property  dominion  West_Indies  Genesis  Biblical_exegesis  Church_of_England  missionaries  American_colonies  colonialism  imperialism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
AARON GRAHAM, review essay -- MERCANTILE NETWORKS IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 56, No. 1 (MARCH 2013), pp. 279-295
Reviewed work(s): ** (1) The capital and the colonies: London and the Atlantic economy, 1660—1700 by Nuala Zahedieh; ** (2) Defying empire: trading with the enemy in colonial New York by Thomas M. Truxes; ** (3) East India patronage and the British state: the Scottish elite and politics in the eighteenth century by George K. McGilvary; ** (4) The familiarity of strangers: the Sephardic diaspora, Livorno and cross-cultural trade in the early modern period by Francesca Trivellato; ** (5) Global trade and commercial networks: eighteenth-century diamond merchants by Tijl Vanneste; ** (6) From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean: the global trade networks of Armenian merchants from New Julfa by Sebouh David Aslanian; ** (7) Oceans of wine: Madeira and the emergence of American trade and taste by David Hancock -- lengthy 17 pages -- paywall Cambridge journals
books  reviews  paywall  economic_history  globalization  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  India  trading_companies  networks  trust  commerce  trade  East_India_Company  Portugal  Italy  Mediterranean  London  patronage  Scotland  Anglo-Scot  1707_Union  clientelism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
NUALA ZAHEDIEH - Regulation, rent-seeking, and the Glorious Revolution in the English Atlantic economy | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 63, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2010), pp. 865-890
The rapid rise of England's colonial commerce in the late seventeenth century expanded the nation's resource base, stimulated efficiency improvements across the economy, and was important for long-term growth. However, close examination of the interests at play in England's Atlantic world does not support the Whiggish view that the Glorious Revolution played a benign role in this story. In the decades after the Restoration, the cases of the Royal African Company and the Spanish slave trade in Jamaica are used to show that the competition between Crown and Parliament for control of regulation constrained interest groups on either side in their efforts to capture the profits of empire. Stuart 'tyranny' was not able to damage growth and relatively competitive (and peaceful) conditions underpinned very rapid increases in colonial output and trade. The resolution of the rules of the Atlantic game in 1689 allowed a consolidated state better to manipulate and manage the imperial economy in its own interests. More secure rent-seeking enterprises and expensive wars damaged growth and European rivals began a process of catch-up. The Glorious Revolution was not sufficient to permanently halt economic development but it was sufficient to slow progress towards industrial revolution. -- very interesting attack on North-Weingast, Pincus et al -- paywall Wiley -- enormous bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  Wiley  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  17thC  18thC  Glorious_Revolution  fiscal-military_state  North-Weingast  rent-seeking  UK_government-colonies  economic_growth  trade  trading_companies  British_politics  Parliament  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  colonialism  mercantilism  tariffs  Whig_Junto  bibliography 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Janet Sorensen - Poems of Nation, Anthems of Empire: English Verse in the Long 18thC by Suvir Kaul | JSTOR: The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. 102, No. 3 (Jul., 2003), pp. 444-446
Looks quite interesting - sees historicist and colonial interlinked - close readings get at both a nationalist imperialism, anxiety re imperialism, the translatio imperii tradition, and concerns of empire,slavery, over extension etc -- starts with Marvell and Dryden, works through the long baggy poems, looking at their different roles and status relative to other writing by the close of the 18thC
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  English_lit  poetry  British_Empire  commerce  nationalism  national_ID  imperialism  colonialism  slavery  Marvell  Dryden  Pope  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers and Robert J. Mayhew - Rethinking 'Disciplinary' History: Geography in British Universities, c.1580-1887 | JSTOR: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2002), pp. 11-29
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Against a background of recent work in the history of geography and of geographical knowledge, the paper considers evidence for the place of geography within British universities before the formal establishment of the first departments of geography. Attention is paid to geography's discursive connections with other subjects within given university curricula, and to the values placed upon its teaching by contemporaries. The paper argues that extant historiographies for British geography should be revised in the light of such evidence. More importantly, the paper raises questions about the sites and intellectual spaces in which geography has been situated and about the content, nature and purpose of writing geography's 'disciplinary' history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  colonialism  exploration  public_sphere  university  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  education  Royal_Society  military_history  maps  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Brenna Moore - Beyond the Catholic-Protestant divide - review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame - Nov 2013
Gregory seems to think if Europe had avoided theological split all would have been well,maybe even avoid modernity and its evils - ignores Catholic relations with other religions and Christianity entanglement with colonialism and economic imperialism -- Also ignores important 20thC European Catholic rethinking of relations with others, support for eg human rights etc that Gregory disparages, ignoring Catholic links -- quote: With this twentieth-century European Catholic scholarly tradition as a backdrop, it appears all the more remarkable that Gregory did not follow its lead in thinking through the role of Christianity’s relationship to non-Christian religions in the making of modernity. Modern civilization, including secularization and consumerism, is incomprehensible when defined as a debate between Protestants and Catholics alone. Christians’ encounters with religious others shaped their own self-understanding in the early modern period and beyond, and the interactions between religiously diverse people must be central to any genealogy of our present. These encounters—sometimes violent, sometimes deeply humane—between Catholics and Jews, between missionaries and those they met on the frontier, between the orientalists and their archives, have to be at the center (or at least included somewhere!) of any analysis of the Christian roots of contemporary global capitalism and consumerism. Maritain and his cohort faced this head-on. José Casanova and Saba Mahmood have leveled similar critiques at Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age. In short, it is impossible to understand the historical trajectory of Christianity without understanding its contact with non-Christian others. Why does Gregory, like Taylor, bracket all of this? Had he not, what difference might it have made for the conclusions of The Unintended Reformation?

John W. O’Malley’s work has shown that few areas of sixteenth-century Catholicism were more significant than the intense upheavals caused by the missionary activity that began with the Portuguese and Spanish conquests and explorations and lasted through the seventeenth century. Catholics, he argues, were not always as fixated on Protestant reforms as we tend to assume (hence his preference for the label “early modern Catholicism” rather than “the Counter-Reformation”).
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  intellectual_history  modernity  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  16thC  17thC  20thC  comparative_religion  Judaism  colonialism  Spanish_Empire  Netherlands  tolerance  Counter-Reformation  Islam  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
E. A. Wrigley: The Divergence of England: The Growth of the English Economy in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: The Prothero Lecture (2000)
JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 10 (2000), pp. 117-141 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- though it's part of Great Divergence debates, Wrigley focus on Britain during 17thC and 18thC and his economic_history work is worth special attention
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  economic_history  Britain  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_growth  political_economy  population  agriculture  trade  industry  colonialism  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Duchesne: The Post-Malthusian World Began in Western Europe in the Eighteenth Century: A Reply to Goldstone and Wong (2003)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 195-205 -- Symposium on Eurocentrism, Sinocentrism, and World History in which Wong and Goldstone attack Duchsene for his critical review of Gunter Frank in which D. maintained Britain had broken through Malthusian limit in 18thC so rejected Wong and Goldstone comparison with China in 18thC as if they were at same point and that 19thC takeoff was contingent that it happened only in England. Symposium includes paper by Wong, Goldstone and response by Duchsene. Recent historiography helpful, though most of debate precedes Pomerantz.
article  jstor  economic_history  historical_sociology  Great_Divergence  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  American_colonies  colonialism  empires  historiography  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Andrew Fitzmaurice: The Civic Solution to the Crisis of English Colonization, 1609-1625 (1999)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Mar., 1999), pp. 25-51 -- Machiavellian Moment on steroids -- Historians have portrayed the Virginia Company and its colony, the first permanent English settlement in America, as an essentially commercial enterprise. The atmosphere of the colony is represented accordingly as one of proto-capitalist individualism. This paper shows that the Virginia Company promoters described the aims of its colony in civic terms: that is, in terms of a politics of virtue, citizenship, and the pursuit of the common good. Promoters of the colony drew on a civic tradition particularly hostile to commerce; a tradition in which wealth was portrayed as Asiatic luxury and corruption. The civic arguments of the Company were a response to the commercial and human disasters which characterized the first years of the colony and its Elizabethan predecessors. The civic ideology promoted by the Company was an attempt to remedy what were perceived to be the causes of this disastrous situation - corruption, greed, faction, and idleness. The promoters' civic arguments also provided an ideological motivation both for potential investors and colonists who might otherwise have been deterred by the financial and human expense.
article  jstor  17thC  James_I  political_philosophy  colonialism  American_colonies  republicanism  civic_virtue  luxury  commerce  common_good  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Philip J. Stern: British Asia and British Atlantic: Comparisons and Connections (2006)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 63, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 693-712 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Historiography context for his book on East India Company
article  jstor  historiography  British_Empire  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  colonialism  imperialism  mercantilism  American_colonies  monopolies  trade  Atlantic  Asia  17thC  18thC  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

14thC  15thC  16thc  17thc  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1710s  1730s  1740s  1750s  abolition  Absolutism  academia  Academia.edu  accountability  africa  African_trade  agency  agrarian_capitalism  agriculture  alliances  amazon.com  america  American_colonies  American_Revolution  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_India  ancient_religions  ancient_Rome  Ancien_régime  Anglican  Anglo-American  Anglo-Dutch  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Anglo-French  Anglo-Irish_constitution  Anglo-Scot  Anglo-Spanish  Anthropocene  anti-Catholic  anticolonialism  Antiquarianism  antiquaries  aristocracy  Aristotelian  Arminian  article  art_history  asia  assimilation  atheism_panic  Atlantic  Augustine  Austria  authority  balance_of_power  Behn  Berkeley  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  biography  biology  Black_Death  blue_water_strategy  Blumenberg  Board_of_Trade  Bodin  body_politic  Bolingbroke  Bolingbroke-family  books  bookshelf  botany  bourgeoisie  Boyle  Britain  Britain-Continent  Britain-invasion  Britannia  British_Army  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_Empire-military  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_Navy  British_politics  Burke  business  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_history  business_influence  business_practices  buy  Calvinist  canon_law  capital  capitalism  Carolina  Cassirer  casuistry  catholics  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  centralization  Central_Asia  central_government  change-social  charity  Charles_I  Charles_I-personal_rule  Charles_II  checks-and-balances  china  China-international_relations  Chinese_history  Christianity  Christology  chronology  church_courts  church_history  Church_of_England  Church_of_Ireland  cities  citizenship  City_politics  city_states  civic_virtue  civility-political  civilization-concept  civilizing_process  civil_liberties  civil_religion  civil_society  classes  class_conflict  clientelism  climate  Colbert  Colbertism  collections  collective_memory  Collins_Anthony  colonialism  colonial_governance  colonies  commerce  commerce-doux  commercial_interest  commercial_law  commodities  commons  commonwealth  common_good  common_law  comparative_anthropology  comparative_economics  comparative_history  comparative_religion  competition  competition-interstate  conquest  consent  conservation  constitutionalism  constitutions  consumerism  consumers  consumer_demand  consumer_revolution  contention  corporate_citizenship  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  corporate_law  corruption  cosmopolitanism  counter-reformation  courses  court_culture  credit  crime  cross-border  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_influence  cultural_transmission  culture_wars  custom  customary_law  decision_theory  Defoe  democracy  demography  demons  Denmark  development  devil  Diderot  diplomatic_history  dissenters  divine_right  dominion  downloaded  Dryden  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Early_Christian  Early_Republic  east  East_India_Company  ecclesiology  economics-and-morality  economic_culture  economic_discourse  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_policy  economic_sociology  education  education-training  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  Elizabeth  emerging_markets  emigration  empire-and_business  empires  empiricism  energy  English_Channel  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  Enlightenment_Project  enthusiasm  entrepreneurs  entrepôts  Epicurean  epistemology  epistemology-history  equality  etexts  ethnic_ID  ethnography  Eurasia  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Evangelical  evolutionary_biology  Exclusion_Crisis  exiles  existentialism  exit-voice-loyalty  exploration  export-led  exports  extinction  faction  family  feudalism  fiction  finance_capital  financial_system  find  find17thC  firms-organization  firms-structure  firms-theory  fiscal-military_state  fishing  foreigners-resident  foreign_policy  foreign_trade  Founders  France  Frederick_the_Great  free-thinkers  freedom  free_trade  French_army  French_Empire  French_Enlightenment  French_foreign_policy  French_government  French_history  French_lit  French_Navy  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  frontier  gender_history  Genesis  genocide  gentry  geography  geohistory  geology  George_I  Georgia  Germany  German_Idealism  German_scholarship  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  global_history  global_system  Glorious_Revolution  Google_Books  government-forms  Great_Chain_of_Being  Great_Divergence  Grotius  guerrillas  guilds  gunpowder  Hanoverian_Succession  Harley  Harrington  haute_bourgeoisie  Hebrew_commonwealth  Hegel  Henry_VIII  heterodoxy  hierarchy  Highlands-Scotland  High_Church  Hinduism  Histoire_des_Deux_Indes  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  historical_change  historical_sociology  historicism  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  history  history-and-social_sciences  history_of_book  history_of_England  history_of_science  Hobbes  Holy_Roman_Empire  House_of_Lords  Huguenots  humanitarian  human_nature  Hume  ideas-theories  ideology  idolatry  imperialism  imperialism-critique  imports  improvement  incentives  indentured_labor  Independents  india  India-British_Empire  Indian_Ocean  indigenous_peoples  individualism  industrialization  industrial_policy  Industrial_Revolution  industry  inequality  infrastructure  Innovation  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_capacity  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  intellectual_property  interest-discourse  interest_groups  interlopers  international_law  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  Interregnum  investment  IR  IR-domestic_politics  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish-Gaelic  Irish_migration  IR_theory  Islam  Islamic_law  Italy  Jacobite-Ireland  James_I  James_II  Japan  Jesuits  Jews  journal  jstor  Judaism  judgment-political  judiciary  just_war  Kant  kindle  kindle-available  kingship  Kirk  labor  labor_history  labor_standards  landed_interest  landowners  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  late_antiquity  latin  Latin_America  law-and-religion  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legitimacy  leisure  Levant  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberties  liberty  liberty-negative  Liberty_Fund  libraries  lieux_de_mémoires  limited_monarchy  links  literacy  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  local_government  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  London  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  lower_orders  Lowland-Scotland  Lutherans  luxury  luxury_goods  Löwith  Madison  Malebranche  Malthus  Manley  Mann_Michael  manufacturing  maps  maritime_history  maritime_law  markets  markets-structure  Marvell  Marxism  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  mass_culture  material_culture  media  medicine  medieval  medieval_history  Mediterranean  memory-cultural  memory-group  mena  mercantilism  mercantilism-violence  mercenaires  merchants  microeconomics  middle_class  migration  military_history  Military_Revolution  militia  missionaries  mixed_government  MNCs  modernity  modernity-emergence  modernization  modernization_theory  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monopolies  monotheism  Montagu_Lady_Mary  Montaigne  Montesquieu  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  Moravians  MPs  multiculturalism  museums  music_history  nabobs  Napoleonic_Wars  narrative  narrative-contested  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  national_tale  Native_Americans  natural_capital  natural_history  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_rights  nature  nature-mastery  nature_worship  naval_history  navigation  Navigation_Acts  Netherlands  networks  networks-business  networks-information  networks-political  networks-religious  networks-social  Nine_Years_War  nobility  north  North-Weingast  North_America  novels  obligation  opposition  organizations  orientalism  Ottomans  Pacific  pagans  pantheism  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  paper  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  parties  partisanship  passive_obedience  path-dependency  Patriot_King  patronage  paywall  Peace_of_Utrecht  peasants  Peiresc  periodization  perpetual_peace  Persia  Peter_the_Great  philanthropy  philohellenism  philology  philosophes  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy  phylogenetics  piracy  plantations  planters  pluralism  pluralism-legal  Pocket  poetry  Poland  politeness  political-theology  political_arithmetick  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_nation  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_sociology  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Pope  Popish_Plot  popular_culture  popular_politics  population  ports  Portugal  post-colonial  postcolonial  postmodern  poststructuralist  poverty  power  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  Presbyterians  primitivism  print_culture  privateers  privileges-corporate  productivity  profit  progress  property  property_rights  protestants  Protestants-Ireland  Protestant_Ascendancy  Protestant_International  proto-industry  Prussia  public_disorder  public_goods  public_health  public_opinion  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  Pufendorf  Puritans  Queen_Anne  querelle_des_rites  race  racialism  racism  rank  rational_religion  Raynal  realism  redistribution  reference  reformation  reformation_of_manners  refugees  regulation  regulatory_capture  relativism  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  religious_history  religious_imagery  religious_lit  religious_practices  religious_wars  Renaissance  rent-seeking  rentiers  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Republic_of_Letters  resistance_theory  responsibility  Restoration  Restoration-France  reviews  revisionism  rhetoric-political  risk-mitigation  risk_management  ritual  Robertson  romances  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Royal_African_Co  Royal_Society  rule_of_law  Russia  sacrifice  salvation  Sanskrit  satire  scepticism  Schlegel  Schmitt  science  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Scot_colonizers  sectarianism  secularization  self  self-and-other  self-defense  self-development  self-examination  self-interest  self-knowledge  Sente  separation-of-powers  settler_colonies  Seven_Years_War  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  shipping  slavery  slavery-Africans  slavery-law  Smith  sociability  social_contract  social_history  social_mobility  social_movements  social_order  social_sciences  social_theory  social_thought  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  soul  Southern_states  South_Asia  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  Spain  Spanish_Empire  species  spirituality  SSRN  state-building  state-of-nature  status  subjectivity  Sweden  Swift  tariffs  taxes  taxonomies  Tech/Culture  technology  technology-adoption  technology-history  teleology  territory  terrorism  textiles  theology  Thirty_Years_War  Thomism-21stC  Three_Kingdoms  Tilly  tolerance  Tories  trade  trade-cultural_transmission  trade-policy  trade_finance  trading_companies  trading_privileges  transport  travel  travel_lit  trust  Tudor  tyranny  UK_government-colonies  Ulster  uncertainty-political  uncertainty-regulation  universalism  university  urban  urbanism  urbanization  urban_development  urban_elites  urban_politics  US_Civil_War  US_constitution  US_economy  US_history  US_politics  US_politics-race  utopian  Victorian  video  virtue  virtuosos  VOC  Voltaire  wages  war  wars-causes  Wars_of_Religion  Warwick_Earl_of  War_of_Austrian_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear  War_of_Spanish_Succession  welfare_state  West_Indies  Whigs  Whig_Junto  white_supremacy  Wiley  William_III  witchcraft  world  xenophobia 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: