dunnettreader + climate   117

Notes on the Global Condition: Nuclear aircraft carriers in the age of the anthropocene – ADAM TOOZE
The refusal of the Trump administration to engage with the question of climate change not only causes consternation worldwide. It also causes tension within the…
US_military  climate  climate-adaptation  military-industrial_complex  Trump_administration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Why Hurricane Irma has stayed so strong for so long | WaPo - Sept 8 2017
Irma ranks among the strongest hurricanes ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. When the storm maintained wind speeds of at least 180 mph for 37 hours, it set a…
climate  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
CEEPR - Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research at MIT (MIT Energy Initiative, Economics Dept & Sloan School)
Since 1977, the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) has been a focal point for research on energy and environmental policy at MIT. CEEPR promotes rigorous, objective research for improved decision making in government and the private sector, and secures the relevance of its work through close cooperation with industry partners from around the globe. CEEPR is jointly sponsored at MIT by the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), the Department of Economics, and the Sloan School of Management. Financial support comes from a variety of sources, including state and federal government research funds, foundation grants and contributions from our corporate and government Associates
website  think-tank  energy  energy-markets  energy-transition  climate  climate-policy  climate-adaptation  climate-diplomacy 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
P Aghion, C Hepburn, A Teytelboym, D Zenghelis - Path dependence, innovation and the economics of climate change (Policy Report 2014) | Grantham Research Institute on climate change and the environment
Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy at London School of Economics and Political Science.
The authors of the report – Professor Philippe Aghion (Harvard University), Professor Cameron Hepburn (University of Oxford), Dr Alexander Teytelboym (University of Oxford) and Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE)Innovation is required to transform our fossil-fuelled economy into a clean, low-carbon economy. But economic models of climate change have overlooked the role of innovation. By taking innovation fully into account, a whole new set of policy conclusions are drawn. This report finds that the longer governments wait to promote clean energy innovation, the greater the eventual cost to the environment and the economy. Increased public support for clean innovation should therefore be a priority. Government policies to promote low-carbon innovation may only need to be in place for a limited time because, once a low-carbon pathway has been kick-started, the economy will become ‘locked-in’ to that low-carbon pathway with no further intervention needed. -- downloaded via Air - added to Evernote
paper  downloaded  Evernote  climate  Innovation  green_economy  green_finance  path-dependence  technology  innovation-government-supported  infrastructure  renewables  economic_growth  economic_sociology  economic_policy  energy  energy-markets 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
NOAA's "Arctic Change" website - Permafrost "home" page
"Home" page for Permafrost-related materials - Permafrost is now included in the Arctic Report Card as an indicator that gets updated every 2-4 years.
website  US_government  science-government_research  NOAA  climate  carbon_budget  COP21  Arctic  links  report 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Holthaus - Bracing Ourselves for the Climate Tipping Point | Pacific Standard - August 2016
After Earth’s warmest month in history, climate scientists gather in Geneva to debate whether we’ve already gone too far.
Pocket  climate  energy-markets  climate-policy  climate-diplomacy  green_economy  green_finance  Innovation  from pocket
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Centre for the Study of Existential Risk - Cambridge
The Centre for Study of Existential Risk is an interdisciplinary research centre focused on the study of human extinction-level risks that may emerge from technological advances. We aim to combine key insights from the best minds across disciplines to tackle the greatest challenge of the coming century: safely harnessing our rapidly-developing technological power. Our current major research projects include Managing Extreme Technological Risk (supported by the Templeton World Charity Foundation) and Extreme Risks and the Global Environment (supported by the Grantham Foundation), as well as our Blavatnik Public Lecture series and the Hauser-Raspe workshop series
website  risk  risk-systemic  risk_assessment  risk_management  risk-mitigation  environment  climate  technology  innovation-risk_management  Innovation  robotics  AI  video 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Durwood Zaelke - IGSD
Durwood Zaelke is founder and President of the Institute for Governance
climate  development 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
James Dyke - Meltdown Earth: the shocking reality of climate change kicks in – but who is listening? - The Conversation - March 2016
And another one bites the dust. The year 2014 was the warmest ever recorded by humans. Then 2015 was warmer still. January 2016 broke the record for the largest monthly temperature anomaly. Then came last month.

February didn’t break climate change records – it obliterated them. Regions of the Arctic were were more than 16℃ warmer than normal – whatever constitutes normal now. But what is really making people stand up and notice is that the surface of the Earth north of the equator was 2℃ warmer than pre-industrial temperatures. This was meant to be a line that must not be crossed.
Pocket  climate  climate-denialism  US_politics  GOP  climate-models  climate-adaptation  energy  Arctic  from pocket
march 2016 by dunnettreader
REMAINS of Greenland - Climate change threat to archaeological sites - LEARN MORE
Archaeological sites in Greenland represent an irreplaceable record of unusually well-preserved material remains covering over 4000 years of human history. The cold climate has offered unique preservation possibilities and several extraordinary finds of organic remains such as wood, bone, textile, fur and ancient DNA have been made. Out of the almost 6000 archaeological sites currently registered in the Greenland Heritage Database, only very few have been excavated and it is anticipated that thousands of sites are awaiting discovery in the unexplored parts of the country. The potential of archaeological sites in Greenland to provide further spectacular finds and thus novel contributions to the understanding Greenland’s and Arctic history is therefore very high. However, it is only a matter of time before this potential diminishes. Climate change is detrimentally affecting preservation conditions, which is leading to an accelerated destruction of archaeological sites. It is therefore urgent to identify and classify the different threats posed by climate change in order to act in due time and safeguard important parts of Greenland’s history. - REMAINS of Greenland is initiated as a direct response to these threats and to the enormous challenge the National Museum of Greenland is currently facing.
website  climate  archaeology  Arctic  permafrost  museums 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
John Quiggin - Peak paper | Crooked Timber Feb 2016
I’ve recently published a piece in Aeon, looking at the peak in global paper use, which occurred a couple of years ago, and arguing that this is an indication…
Instapaper  economic_growth  economy-structure  industry  industrialization  commodities  Information_Economy  productivity  production  natural_resources  energy  energy-markets  environment  climate  consumption  international_political_economy  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Revisiting the relationship between oil prices and costs in the upstream industry - VoxEU Feb 2016
Price goes up, and with a lag, the exploration and extraction costs go up, though by less than the price increase
Pocket  energy  energy-markets  oil_price  climate  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Olivier Geden - Pragmatism in Climate Policy | Project Syndicate - Nov 2015
Re environmental activists finally openly recognizing top-down binding negotiations have been and will continue to be guaranteed to fail
Pocket  international_political_economy  international_organizations  multilateralism  UN  diplomacy-environment  climate  energy  environment  grassroots  from pocket
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Dave Roberts - Carly Fiorina did a 4-minute riff on climate change. Everything she said was wrong.| Vox - August 2015
Fiorina is test marketing the "moderate Republican" approach to do-nothing policies on climate change -- don't look like a crazy science denialist, but after "accepting the science" provide misinformation to justify do-nothing
Pocket  US_politics  GOP  climate-denialism  climate  climate-adaptation  diplomacy-environment  US_foreign_policy  renewables  oil  coal  fiscal_policy  EPA  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - climate science and public scrutiny | Text Patterns ' July 2015
Praise for Hansen's' approach -- his conclusions may be "alarmist" or a truly significant shift in possibility of catastrophe -- but he's showing his work and providing full access to the data he's using so that other scientists can participate, whether to find holes or to build on his work -- he should be praised for the ethical stance and for modeling the behavior that the scientific community should be adopting
Pocket  climate  climate-models  ocean  scientific_culture  scientific_method  science-and-politics  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-social  virtue_epistemology  from pocket
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Kenny - Aiming High - setting the new Sustainable Development Goals -- Finance & Development, June 2015, Vol. 52, No. 2
2015 marks the deadline for the MDGs... And while it might come as a surprise to those in Japan, Europe, or North America, the past 15 years may have been the period of greatest progress in humanity’s quality of life. Not least, the available data suggest that we have seen the fastest declines in global child mortality and absolute poverty in recorded history. As a result, we have far surpassed the first MDG—to halve the number of people worldwide living on less than $1.25 a day. 2015 is also the starting date for the SDGs to be agreed at the UN this fall. These goals outline a vision of progress to 2030 covering poverty, health, education, security, the environment, governance, gender equality, and much more. ..at Addis Ababa in July this year will try to finance that new agenda. ... at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December, countries will pledge to cut greenhouse gas emissions, with the hope of setting us on a path away from catastrophic global warming. A strong agreement in Addis Ababa and progress toward the SDGs depend on advanced economies’ understanding that the issue is not altruism but naked self-interest. In 2002, when rich countries ... discussed global cooperation to meet the MDGs, these countries may have asked, “What can we do for them?” This time around the process can only be seen as “What can we do for each other?” Even though developing countries need global ties to make progress, at issue now is not persuading cash-strapped OECD finance ministers to be a little less skinflint but tackling a set of global problems that can be resolved only with the support of the developing world. -- in F&D issue downloaded as pdf to Note
article  sustainability  development  globalization  global_governance  global_system  climate  environment  trade  trade-policy  trade-agreements  global_value_chains  SDGs  poverty  aid  health  OECD_economies  public_finance  public_goods  cross-border  tax_collection  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Sáni Zou, et al -Mainstreaming Climate Change into Financial Governance: Rationale and Entry Points | CIGI June 17, 2015
Sáni Zou, Romain Morel, Thomas Spencer, Ian Cochran, and Michel Colombier -- Fixing Climate Governance Policy Brief No. 5 -- Today, the financial sector is exposed to the physical risks associated with climate change and the impact of climate policies. Securing global financial and economic stability and scaling up low-carbon, climate-resilient investments are not conflicting, but rather mutually reinforcing, objectives. The fifth policy brief in the Fixing Climate Governance series argues that while crucial, classic climate policies do not appear sufficient to address the challenges from climate change that the financial sector is facing. Policies affecting and instruments matching the demand side and supply side of finance need to be aligned with climate objectives to efficiently shift investments toward a low-carbon, climate-resilient economy. Once the link between climate change and the mandates of international financial sector governance and regulatory institutions is understood, the existing tool kits and processes of these institutions — common standards, principles and guidelines with various levels of legal force, country surveillance and technical assistance — present entry points to mainstream climate-related risks and opportunities into their core operations. -- didn't download
paper  green_finance  international_finance  financial_regulation  financial_innovation  risk_assessment  risk_management  climate  investment-socially_responsible  sustainability 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Avidly / Dana Luciano - The Inhuman Anthropocene | LA Review of Books Blog - March 2015
Recently, a study appeared in the journal Nature proposing a previously unsuggested start date for the Anthropocene: 1610 CE. -- It was chosen because it was the lowest point in a decades-long decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide, measurable by traces found in Artic ice cores. The change in the atmosphere, Lewis and Maslin deduced, was caused by the death of over 50 million indigenous residents of the Americas in the first century after European contact, the result of “exposure to diseases carried by Europeans, plus war, enslavement and famine”. The destruction of the indigenous population (leaving only an estimated 6 million survivors on both northern and southern American continents by the mid-17thC) meant a significant decline in farming, fire-burning and other human activities affecting atmospheric carbon levels. Lewis and Maslin point to other geologically significant aspects of Euro-American contact as well, including the transfer of plant and animal species between Europe and the Americas, leading to a significant loss of biodiversity and acceleration of species extinction rates. From this view, the Anthropocene develops alongside the global pathways of modernity. Lewis and Maslin term this proposal the “Orbis hypothesis,” from the Latin for “globe.” -- copied to Pocket -- chart of the classification of Earth history by the International association of stratographists downloaded to complexity and emergence etc Gintis folder
Anthropocene  geology  climate  biology  botany  natural_history  colonialism  Native_Americans  genocide  extinction  Pocket 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Morgan Kelly, Cormac Ó Gráda - The myth of Europe’s Little Ice Age | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 28 March 2015
The Little Ice Age is generally seen as a major event in European history. Analysing a variety of recent weather reconstructions, this column finds that European weather appears constant from the Middle Ages until 1900, and that events like the freezing of the Thames and the disappearance of English vineyards have simpler explanations than changing climate. It appears instead that the European Little Ice Age is a statistical artefact, where the standard climatological practice of smoothing what turn out to be white noise data prior to analysis gives the spurious appearance of irregular oscillation – a Slutsky Effect.
climate  statistics  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
CDP - About us
CDP works to transform the way the world does business to prevent dangerous climate change and protect our natural resources. We see a world where capital is efficiently allocated to create long-term prosperity rather than short-term gain at the expense of our environment.

Evidence and insight is vital to driving real change. We use the power of measurement and information disclosure to improve the management of environmental risk. By leveraging market forces including shareholders, customers and governments, CDP has incentivized thousands of companies and cities across the world’s largest economies to measure and disclose their environmental information. We put this information at the heart of business, investment and policy decision making.

We hold the largest collection globally of self reported climate change, water and forest-risk data. Through our global system companies, investors and cities are better able to mitigate risk, capitalize on opportunities and make investment decisions that drive action towards a more sustainable world.
website  Lon  risk_management  risk-systemic  climate  climate-adaptation  institutional_investors  disclosure  water  energy  energy-markets  industry  supply_chains  sustainability  corporate_governance  green_finance  green_economy 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Pricing Carbon - Program site | World Bank
Background papers, events, reports etc on carbon pricing methods, markets, integration of markets, internal pricing by businesses etc
website  World_Bank  climate  energy  energy-markets  carbon_pricing  risk_management  local_government  global_governance 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Oscar Widerberg and Philipp Pattberg - International Cooperative Initiatives in Global Climate Governance: Raising the Ambition Level or Delegitimizing the UNFCCC? (2014) | Global Policy Journal - Wiley Online Library
To close the gap between existing country pledges and the necessary ambition level to limit anthropogenic climate change to not more than 2°C average global temperature increase above pre-industrial levels, decision makers from both the public and private domain have started to explore a number of complementary approaches to the top-down targets-and-timetables approach of international climate change policy. Referred to as International Cooperative Initiatives (ICI), these governance arrangements are now also officially acknowledged under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. While proponents see ICIs as important bridging devices towards more ambitious climate policy, in particular up to 2020, critical observers note that the voluntary nature of ICIs makes it difficult to assess their contribution to climate change mitigation. This article scrutinizes the potential of ICIs to meaningfully contribute to closing the emissions gap along the criteria of effectiveness, legitimacy and institutional fit. As means of illustration, the analytical framework is applied to a random sample of nine ICIs (out of a total of 45 listed on the UNFCCC Secretariat's website). We find that while potential technical effectiveness is high, legitimacy and institutional fit should be improved with a view towards integrating ICIs into the emerging post-2015 climate governance architecture. -- Wiley available free -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  global_governance  IR_theory  climate  international_organizations  international_law  bilateral_agreements  United_Nations  legitimacy-international  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Ma Yuge and Joel Sandhu - Making Sense of China and India’s Low-Carbon Pathways | Global Policy Journal 16th September 2014
China and India’s low-carbon development is crucial for global sustainability and domestic welfare. However, embedded political and economic obstacles have prevented a smooth and effective transition towards a low-carbon future in the two emerging countries. This article analyzes China and India’s energy efficiency policies as a lens into this question. We argue that the existing energy efficiency and broader low-carbon development pathways – India’s market-oriented approach and China’s target-driven paradigm – are not sufficient to address the challenges. Policymakers should reflect on and fix the shortcomings of the current pathways by paying close attention to the various forms of maneuvers of low-carbon policies in the given political and economic environments in China and India. -- part of Global Policy "Juxtaposition" program re comparative work on China and India -- didn't download paper
paper  IR  global_governance  environment  climate  energy  China  India  development  green_economy  local_government  central_government 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Rasmus Karlsson and Jonathan Symons - Making Climate Leadership Meaningful: Energy Research as a Key to Global Decarbonisation - Feb 2015 | Global Policy Journal- Wiley Online Library
This article revisits a number of familiar debates about climate change mitigation yet draws some unorthodox conclusions. First, that progress towards a renewable small-scale energy future in environmentally conscious countries such as Germany and Sweden may take the world as a whole further away from climate stability by reducing the political pressure to finance breakthrough innovation. Second, that without such game-changing innovations, developing countries will continue to deploy whatever technologies are domestically available, scalable and affordable, including thermal coal power in most instances. Third and finally, that as any realistic hope of achieving climate stability hinges on the innovation of breakthrough technologies, the urgency of climate change calls not so much for the domestic deployment of existing energy technologies but rather a concentrated effort to develop technologies that will be adopted globally. These arguments imply that national innovation policy, and an international treaty establishing a ‘Low-Emissions Technology Commitment’ should be the central focus of climate policy. -- added to Wiley profile
article  paywall  Wiley  global_governance  energy  climate  technology  Innovation  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  green_finance  development  IR  IR-domestic_politics  economic_growth  IP-global_governance  innovation-government_policy  industrial_policy  industrialization 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
John Irons and Isaac Shapiro - Report: Regulation, employment, and the economy: Fears of job loss are overblown | Economic Policy Institute - April 2011
After the first midterms debacle -- . In the first months since the new Congress convened, the House has held dozens of hearings designed to elicit criticisms of regulations, introduced legislation that would dramatically alter the regulatory process by requiring congressional approval of all major regulations, and passed a spending bill that would slash the funding levels of regulatory agencies and restrict their ability to enact rules covering areas such as greenhouse gas emissions. (..) opponents of regulation argue that agency rules are damaging to the economy in general and job generation in particular. Some say specific regulations will destroy millions of jobs and cite a study (critiqued later in this paper) purporting to show that regulations cost $1.75 trillion per year. Regulations are frequently discussed only in the context of their threat to job creation, while their role in protecting lives, public health, and the environment is ignored. This report reviews whether the evidence backs the perspective of regulatory opponents. The first section looks broadly at the effects of regulations, whether they play a useful role in the economy, and whether their overall benefits outweigh their overall costs. The second section assesses the theory and evidence for the assertion that regulations undermine jobs and the economy. The last section examines the kinds of studies that are discussed when regulations are being formulated; these studies, often cited in debates and therefore of great importance, tend to be prospective
estimates of the effects of proposed regulations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_politics  Obama_administration  Congress  GOP  deregulation  cost-benefit  unemployment  business_influence  public_policy  public_goods  public_health  environment  climate  financial_regulation  US_government  regulation  regulation-environment  regulation-costs  common_good  commons  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economic_culture  statistics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Finally Some Good News About Clean Energy Investment | Mother Jones Jan 2015
After 3 year investment decline - BNEF produces quarterly reports that track how much money governments and the private sector are pouring into wind, solar, biofuels and other green energy projects. In 2014, the United States enjoyed its biggest investments since 2012, but it was China that once again drove the numbers. China's clean energy spending shot up 32 percent to a record $89.5 billion, cementing its place as the world's top market for green investment
energy  investment  China  climate 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Kemal Derviş homes in on the key questions surrounding the nature and measurement of contemporary growth. - Project Syndicate
Slowly but surely, the debate about the nature of economic growth is entering a new phase. The emerging questions are sufficiently different from those of recent decades that one can sense a shift in the conceptual framework that will structure the discussion of economic progress – and economic policy – from now on.
economic_growth  political_economy  trchnology  innovation  stagnation  LDCs  Piletty  emergy  natural_resources  climate  inequality  labor  unemployment  automation  basic_income 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Xi’s Reform Gambit by Andrew Sheng and Xiao Geng - Project Syndicate - Dec 2014
Xi’s reforms, like Deng’s, reflect the absence of alternative. - Only by addressing these weaknesses and shifting to an innovation-based, environmentally sustainable growth model can the country continue to prosper – and ultimately achieve high-income status. The difference between the two reform efforts is that Xi must also address the shortcomings of Deng’s work. Deng mistakenly believed that the state, which retained its central role in the economy, would be able to use new market-generated resources to correct the short-run inequalities created by his reforms. But the bureaucracy and its privileged networks benefited most, and a second, non-market source of inequality – endemic official corruption – became entrenched. That is why Xi’s anti-corruption campaign was a critical precursor to reform.
China  economic_growth  economic_reform  legal_reform  rule_if_law  corruption  bureaucracy  SOEs  financial_system  climate 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Leber - Report: Tidal Floods in East Coast Cities | New Republic - October 2014
Live on the East Coast? Rising sea levels will cause problems for your home and community a lot sooner than you probably think. In a new report, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) forecasts that 30 major cities on the East Coast will face more frequent and extensive flooding in 15 years time. In 30 years, flooding will be a near-daily occurence in nine of these cities. The sea level has risen roughly eight inches globally from 1880 to 2009, largely due to global warming, but the rise has been over 10 inches along parts of the U.S. Atlantic coast. Higher sea level leads to higher tides, which can flood cities' streets, waterfronts, and low-lying properties. As extreme high tides become more common, UCS researchers predict that things like power outages, lost cell phone coverage, and impassable roadways will become challenges of daily life. (..) Climate Central published a report in September that shows many of Washington, D.C.'s low-lying tourist sites, like the National Mall, flooded by the end of the century. Washington D.C. fares the worst in the UCS report as well. Using a moderate model for sea-level rise in the next 15 years, the report says D.C. can expect more than 150 tidal floods a year. By 2045, D.C could expect 400, with the city sometimes flooding twice a day. Most of the 52 places analyzed could see a 10-fold increase of tidal floods. -- 2 reports, downloaded pdfs to Note
climate  ocean  climate-adaptation  US_society  cities  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Dave Johnson - The Cost To Our Economy From Republican Obstruction And Sabotage | Campaign for America's Future - September 2014
After listing key filibusters -- What would it have meant for the economy and jobs to launch a post-stimulus effort to maintain and modernize our infrastructure? How about reversing the tax structure that pays companies to move jobs out of the country? How about equal pay for women? How about a minimum wage increase? How about hundreds of thousands of teachers and first responders going back to work? How about being able to organize into unions to fight for wages, benefits and safer working conditions? How about relief from crushing student loan debt? -- In the House GOP leadership has been following the “Hastert Rule” to obstruct bills that would win with a majority vote. -- So instead of looking at what has been blocked in the House, we should look at what has passed. What has passed is a record of economic sabotage. Noteworthy is the GOP “Path to Prosperity Budget” (“Ryan budget”), described as “Cuts spending & implements pro-growth reforms that boost job creation.” It dramatically cuts taxes on the rich. It privatizes Medicare. It cuts spending on infrastructure, health care for the poor, education, research, public-safety, and low-income programs. It turns Medicaid, food stamps, and other poverty programs into state block grants. And lo and behold, this GOP budget that passed the House cuts taxes and cuts funding for even maintaining – never mind modernizing – our vital infrastructure needs. This is a budget of economic sabotage. Other GOP House “jobs” bills, listed at Boehner’s “jobs” page include: -- horrifyingly awful policies with Orwellian titles or red meat specials -- special attention to keeping oil & gas subsidies flowing and eviserating regulation, especially EPA -- Johnson stresses, the voters are unaware of all this thanks in part to the MSM which is ballanced re political parties, pro business & anti labor, and guilty of mindlessly peddling what Wren-Lewis calls mediamacro. Good links
US_economy  US_politics  Congress  Great_Recession  GOP  unemployment  public_finance  public_goods  state_government  welfare  social_insurance  poverty  infrastructure  Obama_administration  health_care  women-rights  women-work  wages  fiscal_policy  fiscal_drag  taxes  1-percent  energy  climate  regulation-environment  R&D  Senate  House_of_Representatives  polarization  student_debt  education-finance  education-privatization  corporate_tax  labor_law  unions  trickle-down 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Certainties, Uncertainties and Choices with Global Warming - NYTimes.com
Steven E. Koonin, once the Obama administration’s undersecretary of energy for science and chief scientist at BP, stirred up a swirl of turbulence in global warming discourse this week after The Wall Street Journal published “Climate Science is Not Settled,” his essay calling for more frankness about areas of deep uncertainty in climate science, more research to narrow error ranges and more acknowledgement that society’s decisions on energy and climate policy are based on values as much as data. (The Journal seems to keep this headline on file; here’s a 2009 essay, “Climate Science Isn’t Settled,” by the M.I.T. climatologist Richard Lindzen.) Predictably, the piece by Koonin, who became the founding director of New York University’s important Center for Urban Science and Progress in 2012, was quickly hailed by fossil fuel defenders. At the same time, some of Koonin’s central points about the state of climate science were sharply challenged by climate scientists and climate campaigners. I was on the run at the time but sent Koonin a couple of questions, which I also posted on Tumblr. Here they are with his answers (with some email shorthand cleaned up), along with a fresh critique of Koonin’s argument by a group of climate science and policy researchers associated with Carnegie Mellon University and a final thought from me: -- Revkin is a squish since clearly the Carnegie Mellon folks aren't making extravagant claims and Koonin's piece is all about framing, which of course is trumpeted as climate denial fodder - he couldn't be that naive leaving it up to the WSJ to frame his piece - he should be hung by the thumbs for giving aid & comfort -- Revkin has good links to discussions of planning with deep uncertainty
article  US_politics  climate  uncertainty  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  links 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhodium Group » American Climate Prospectus: Economic Risks in the US - Risky Business Project Report - June 24, 2014 (updated August)
Trevor Houser, Robert Kopp, Solomon Hsiang, Michael Delgado, Amir Jina, Kate Larsen, Michael Mastrandrea, Shashank Mohan, Robert Muir-Wood, DJ Rasmussen, James Rising, and Paul Wilson -- The US faces a range of economic risks from global climate change — from increased flooding and storm damage, to climate-driven changes in crop yields and labor productivity, to heat-related strains on energy and public health systems. The American Climate Prospectus (ACP) provides a groundbreaking new analysis of these and other climate risks by region of the country and sector of the economy. By linking state-of-the-art climate models with econometric research of human responses to climate variability and cutting edge private sector risk assessment tools, the ACP offers decision-makers a data driven assessment of the specific risks they face. The ACP is the result of an independent assessment of the economic risks of climate change commissioned by the Risky Business Project. In conducting this assessment, RHG convened a research team, co-led by climate scientist Dr. Robert Kopp of Rutgers University and economist Dr. Solomon Hsiang of the University of California, Berkeley, and partnered with Risk Management Solutions (RMS), the world’s largest catastrophe-modeling company for insurance, reinsurance, and investment-management companies. The team’s research methodology and draft work was reviewed by an Expert Review Panel (ERP) composed of leading climate scientists and economists, acknowledged within the report. The ACP was released on June 24, 2014 alongside a Risky Business summary -- American Climate Prospectus: Economic Risks in the United States (complete report, updated August 2014, 23.2 mb)
US_economy  climate  risk  risk-systemic  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  insurance  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Esty - Bottom-Up Climate Fix - NYTimes.com - September 2014
Smart people in the 20th century thought we could tackle climate change with a treaty in which the world’s nations agreed to “targets and timetables” for reducing emissions. These reductions would be implemented by top-down, national mandates and government support for clean energy technologies. But 22 years after the original climate agreement, emissions continue to rise and threats of significant harm loom larger. As one of those who, as an official at the Environmental Protection Agency, negotiated that first United Nations treaty in 1992, I believe we need to shift gears and try something new. Relying on national governments alone to deliver results is not enough, as the last two decades have shown. The real action on climate change around the world is coming from governors, mayors, corporate chief executives and community leaders. They are the ones best positioned to make change happen on the ground. Accordingly, we need to move from a top-down strategy to a bottom-up approach.
global_governance  climate  energy  local_government  nation-state  collective_action  public-private_partnerships  green_economy  green_finance  Innovation  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  treaties  international_political_economy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
350.org
350.org was founded by a group of university friends in the U.S. along with author Bill McKibben, who wrote one of the first books on global warming for the general public. When we started organizing in 2008, we saw climate change as the most important issue facing humanity — but climate action was mired in politics and all but stalled. We didn’t know how to fix things, but we knew that one missing ingredient was a climate movement that reflected the scale of the crisis. So we started organizing coordinated days of action that linked activists and organizations around the world, including the International Day of Climate Action in 2009, the Global Work Party in 2010, Moving Planet in 2011, and Climate Impacts Day in 2012. We held the “world’s biggest art installation” and “the most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history.” We figured that if we were going to be a movement, then we had to start acting like one. Click here to watch videos of these global mobilisations. Today, 350.org works in almost every country in the world on campaigns like fighting coal power plants in India, stopping the Keystone XL pipeline in the U.S, and divesting public institutions everywhere from fossil fuels. All of our work leverages people power to dismantle the influence and infrastructure of the fossil fuel industry, and to develop people-centric solutions to the climate crisis.
grassroots  alt-globalization  climate  energy  science-public  global_governance  global_system  sustainability  green_economy  US_politics  UN  UNEP 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Bill McKibben - Bad news for Obama: Fracking may be worse than burning coal | Grist - 8 Sep 2014
In the official Obama story (one being echoed in Hillary Clinton’s climate talking points), natural gas is a “bridge” to a world of solar and wind power, which isn’t quite ready yet. But in fact, in just the same years that we’ve learned to frack we’ve also learned an awful lot about how to scale up wind and sun. And that means that far from being a bridge, the big investments in natural gas may actually be a breakwater that keeps this new wave of truly clean energy from washing onto our shores. -- natural gas leak problems, both fracking, wells & transport -- EDF is convinced that with tight regulation and constant monitoring and inspection, about 40% of the leakage can be inexpensively controlled: about a penny per thousand cubic feet of gas, says the group’s chief scientist, Steve Hamburg. Federal rules requiring “green completion” of fracked wells will go into effect next year, a step Howarth applauds — though he and others note that enforcement will be largely left to state officials,... Still, with “unprecedented investment in natural gas infrastructure and regulatory oversight,” says Howarth, you might be able to cut leakage in half...“might result in a very modest reduction in total greenhouse gas emissions.” -- the other big factor slowing growth in renewable energy: the sudden rise in cheap shale gas. Even as the price of solar panels has dropped, inexpensive fracked gas reduces the incentives to convert to sun and wind. And once you’ve built the pipelines and gas-fired power plants, the sunk investment makes it that much harder to switch: Suddenly you have a bunch of gas barons who will fight as hard as the coal barons Obama is now trying to subdue. -- The head of the United Nations’ environment program, Achem Steiner, said earlier this year that the development of shale gas would be “a liability” in fighting global warming if “it turns into a 20-to-30-year delay” for low- and zero-carbon models.
Obama_administration  climate  energy  renewables  fracking  infrastructure  investment  energy-markets 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Legislative Tracker | Georgetown Climate Center
The Georgetown Climate Center tracks federal legislation that affects adaptation, energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and transportation policies. The Center also analyzes key legislation and identifies how pending bills could impact existing state policies and programs.
website  US_government  Congress  legislation  climate  climate-adaptation  risk-mitigation  land_use_planning  infrastructure  local_government  ocean  coastal_development  regulation-environment 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Report: Zoning for Sea-Level Rise | Georgetown Climate Center - December 13, 2012
To help local communities address the increased flooding expected from sea-level rise and more frequent extreme weather events, the Georgetown Climate Center designed a model sea-level rise ordinance to provide local governments with a template for tailoring regulations to meet the needs of their community and its particularized vulnerabilities. To effectively balance all the competing interests in coastal resources in the face of climate threats, local governments will need flexible and robust land-use regulations. Zoning is the most powerful tool that local governments have to preemptively mitigate hazards. Through planning and zoning, local governments can determine what is at risk, what is safe to build, and where it is safe to build. By analyzing vulnerabilities and planning for impacts, local governments can shape landowner expectations and build political support for adaptive measures. Through regulations, local governments can ensure that fewer people and structures are in harm’s way when impacts occur, and that developers site and construct new structures to be more resilient to flooding and other impacts. Below is a link to the executive summary describing this work. -- didn't download
local_government  land_use_planning  property  property-confiscations  property_rights  climate  climate-adaptation  political_economy  regulation  regulation-environment  incentives  ocean  water  coastal_development 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Adaptation Clearinghouse | Georgetown Climate Center
Tap into the adaptation expertise of the Georgetown Climate Center and its partners. Find resources using the search, mapping, and browsing tools displayed on this page. **--** Featured Policy Areas -- * Law & Governance. * Sea-Level Rise. * Urban Heat. **--** Sector Materials to Get You Started -- * Coasts. * Public Health. * Transportation. * Water **--** The Adaptation Clearinghouse seeks to assist state policymakers, resource managers, academics, and others who are working to help communities adapt to climate change. The Clearinghouse was developed by the Georgetown Climate Center through the generous support of the Rockefeller Foundation and all of the wonderful funders who make our work possible.
website  technical_assistance  climate  climate-adaptation  local_government  law-and-environment  law-and-economics  coordination-governments  ocean  water  transport  urban_development  public_health 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Georgetown Climate Center Resources to Help Communities Prepare for Climate Changes | Georgetown Climate Center
With the planet warming and extreme weather becoming the new normal, states and communities are seeking out resources to help them anticipate climate impacts and protect residents, homes, businesses, and public infrastructure from rising seas, heat, drought, wildfires, extreme weather, and other climate impacts. The Georgetown Climate Center strives to help communities meet these challenges by addressing the legal barriers that communities face when adapting to rising sea levels, and seeks to help localities prepare for the increased frequency, scope, and severity of heat events and extreme weather. The Center also strives to help communities spend disaster relief funds wisely by preparing for the next big storm – not just rebuilding to meet the status quo. The Georgetown Climate Center provides its clients with broad legal advice and policy options, along with strategies to adapt to each set of challenges. It also provides technical assistance to selected states and localities.
website  climate  climate-adaptation  risk-mitigation  land_use_planning  infrastructure  local_government  ocean  coastal_development  property_rights  law-and-economics  law-and-environment  administrative_law  regulation  cross-border  federalism  public_finance  public_goods  disaster  technical_assistance 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Adaptation Tool Kit: Sea-Level Rise and Coastal Land Use | Georgetown Climate Center
The Adaptation Tool Kit explores 18 different land-use tools that can be used to preemptively respond to the threats posed by sea-level rise to both public and private coastal development and infrastructure, and strives to assist governments in determining which tools to employ to meet their unique socio-economic and political contexts. To this end, the tool kit also provides policymakers with a framework for decision making. Each tool is analyzed by (1) the type of power exercised to implement it (planning, regulatory, spending, or tax and market-based tools); (2) the policy objective that it facilitates (protection, accommodation, planned retreat, or preservation); and (3) the type of existing or potential land uses that the tool can be used to adapt (critical infrastructure, existing development, developable lands, and non-developable lands). A top level analysis of the trade-offs between tools—the economic, environmental, and social costs and benefits, and the legal and administrative feasibility of implementing each tool—is also provided. -- didn't download
local_government  land_use_planning  infrastructure  climate  ocean  coastal_development  regulation-environment  incentives  property_rights  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  law-and-economics  law-and-environment  environment  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  technical_assistance  political_economy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Preparing Our Communities for Climate Impacts: Recommendations for Federal Action | Georgetown Climate Center - September 2014
The Georgetown Climate Center released 100 recommendations today to improve federal programs that could be used to prepare for climate change. The new report will inform the White House State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.The report draws from a series of workshops with leading federal, state and local officials and builds upon lessons learned post-disaster in New Orleans (following Hurricane Katrina), New York (Hurricane Sandy) and Vermont (Hurricane Irene). The report identifies more than 30 federal programs, initiatives and laws that can be used to prepare for extreme events such as storms, floods and heat waves as well as rising seas. Although state and local governments will be the primary actors when it comes to preparing for climate change impacts, the federal government can boost – or impede – preparedness. The federal government sends billions of dollars to states and communities every year, some of which could be used more effectively to adapt to climate change. Federal laws and regulations also can be important drivers of state and local action. But, in some cases, federal rules have hindered state and local innovation. The recommendations in the report explore how existing federal dollars, programs, regulations and policies can be retooled, repurposed and deployed to promote and remove barriers to adaptation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  local_government  state_government  disaster  climate  risk-mitigation  environment  administrative_agencies  ocean  coordination-governments  regulation  cross-border  federalism  public_finance  infrastructure  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Home - UNEP Division of Global Environment Facility Coordination (DGEF)
UNEP is an Implementing Agency of the GEF with the World Bank and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and is the only GEF Agency whose core business is the environment. UNEP plays a key role in supporting countries to develop and execute GEF projects that fit within its comparative advantage. UNEP’s comparative advantage within the GEF has been defined as: ** Scientific assessments, monitoring, early warning; ** Linking science to policy (Capacity Building, Enabling Activities) at national, regional and global levels; ** Innovation, technology transfer and lifting barriers; ** Regional and global cooperation; ** Awareness raising, advocacy, and Knowledge Management
website  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  UNDP  green_economy  green_finance  climate  environment  technology_transfer  technical_assistance  institution-building  global_governance 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Smart Track Can't Be Fast Track in Disguise - Citizens Trade Campaign
FastTrackinDisguiseNearly 600 organizations, together representing millions of Americans, have sent a joint letter to Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-OR) expressing their steadfast opposition to Fast Track and outlining the minimum requirements for a new, democratic and accountable trade policy-making process. Earlier this year, Senator Wyden announced he is working on new “Smart Track” legislation to replace the expired Fast Track process that allows harmful trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) to be rushed through Congress circumventing ordinary review, amendment and debate procedures. The sign-on letter promoted by CTC members such as the Sierra Club, Communications Workers of America, the Teamsters and Public Citizen, among others both inside and outside CTC, urges that Fast Track be eliminated and replaced with a new model of trade authority that includes transparency in trade negotiations, a Congressional role in selecting trade partners, a clear set of negotiating mandates and Congressional certification that mandates have been met before negotiations can conclude. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  Congress  trade-policy  trade-agreements  unions  climate  environment  transparency  civil_society  grassroots  MNCs  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  international_political_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The 21st Century Investor: Ceres Blueprint for Sustainable Investing — Ceres
Unprecedented risks to the global economy make this a challenging time for the 21st century investor—institutional asset owners and their investment managers—most of which have multi-generational obligations to beneficiaries. Climate change, resource scarcity, population growth, energy demand, ensuring the human rights of workers across global supply chains, and access to fresh water are some of the major issues challenging our ability to build a sustainable economy, one that meets the needs of people today without compromising the needs of future generations. -- This Blueprint is written for the 21st Century investor— institutional asset owners and their investment managers—who need to understand and manage the growing risks posed by climate change, resource scarcity, population growth, human and labor rights, energy demand and access to water—risks that will challenge businesses and affect investment returns in the years and decades to come. -- section of Ceres website devoted to investor related initiatives - proxy voting guides, etc - and corporate and public finance isuues, such as sustainability risk disclosure, listing srandards, Climate Bonds Principles -- downloaded pdf of executive summary of report
report  climate  energy  water  ocean  demography  supply_chains  global_economy  global_governance  sustainability  financial_system  capital_markets  institutional_investors  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  public_finance  investors  disclosure  asset_management  political_economy  international_political_economy  Labor_markets  human_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Green Bond Principles 2014: Voluntary Process Guidelines for Issuing Green Bonds — Ceres
Green Bonds enable capital-raising and investment for new and existing projects with environmental benefits. Recent activity indicates that the market for Green Bonds is developing rapidly. The Green Bond Principles (GBP) are voluntary process guidelines that recommend transparency and disclosure and promote integrity in the development of the Green Bond market by clarifying the approach for issuance of a Green Bond. The GBP are intended for broad use by the market: they provide issuers guidance on the key components involved in launching a credible Green Bond; they aid investors by ensuring availability of information necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of their Green Bond investments; and they assist underwriters by moving the market towards standard disclosures which will facilitate transactions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
green_economy  green_finance  reform-economic  reform-finance  climate  capital_markets  investors  environment  disclosure  financial_innovation  standards-sustainability  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Sean Kidney - World Bank does a 10yr, AAA $12.06m green retail bond especially for Merrill Lynch Wealth Management clients. Harbinger? | Climate Bonds Initiative - Sep 2, 2014
A new green retail bond (link is external) has been issued by the World Bank in conjunction (link is external)Merrill Lynch Wealth Management (link is external). The bond has 10 year tenor, coupon of 2.32% for the first 5 years which gradually increases to a maximum of 8.82% and is callable after the first year. A very interesting approach, presumably carefully worked out with Merrill Lynch. The World Bank green bond program's credentials are verified by CICERO (link is external). One characteristic that some financial media coverage has been highlighting is that this was the first green bond issued that has a "callable (link is external)" structure. The World Bank does like to try things out in the retail space: in 2011 they issued some retail green bonds through the BoAML network, paying a fixed coupon for the first year that switched to a floating coupon after one year (but weren't callable). Earlier this year they issued another structured bond through BNP Paribas. That bond was linked to an equity index (link is external). All part of working out what will fly in the retail space, so others can then pick and run with successful formats.
financial_innovation  financial_sector_development  capital_markets  World_Bank  investors  sustainability  green_economy  green_finance  reform-economic  reform-finance  climate  links 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
WEF's Global Risk Report | Silvia Merler at Bruegel.org - September 2014
Last week, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published its Global Risk Report (GRR) for 2014/15. The report is an exercise conducted by the WEF since 2006, but this year’s issue is particularly interesting because it adopts an historical perspective, offering insights on how the world has changed in respondents’ eyes and concerns. The GRR assesses risks that are global in nature and have the potential to cause significant negative impact across entire countries and industries if they take place over a time frame of up to 10 years. 31 such risks are identified in the report and grouped under five categories – economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological. *-* Economic Risks include fiscal and liquidity crises, failure of a major financial mechanism or institution, oil-price shocks, chronic unemployment and failure of physical infrastructure on which economic activity depends. *-* Environmental Risks encompass both natural disasters and man-made risks such as collapsing ecosystems, freshwater shortages, nuclear accidents and failure to mitigate or adapt to climate change. *-* Geopolitical Risks cover politics, diplomacy, conflict, crime and global governance. These risks range from terrorism, disputes over resources and war to governance being undermined by corruption, organized crime and illicit trade. *-* Societal Risks are intended to capture risks related to social stability – such as severe income disparities, food crises and dysfunctional cities – and public health, such as pandemics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the rising burden of chronic disease. *-* Technological Risks covers major risks related to the centrality of information and communication technologies to individuals, businesses and governments (such as cyber attacks, infrastructure disruptions and data loss). -- excellent network chart showing how risks are interrelated within and across categories -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  global_economy  global_governance  global_system  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_crisis  climate  energy  water  inequality  unemployment  geopolitics  infrastructure  public_health  public_goods  urban_development  urbanization  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brad Plumer - The oceans are acidifying at the fastest rate in 300 million years. How bad could it get? - Vox September 2014
Followup post on the WMO report plus IPCC info -- We know the oceans have already been acidifying rapidly, with acidity levels increasing 30% since the Industrial Revolution (...pH of ocean surface water has dropped from 8.18 to 8.07). As best scientists can tell from looking at historical data, this change is likely unprecedented in the last 300 million years. And according to the WMO's most recent report, there's no sign that this process is slowing down. So what might acidification look like in the future? That largely depends on how much extra carbon dioxide we put into the atmosphere. Below is a map from the IPCC looking at what would happen if emissions keep rising at their current rate. Meanwhile, there's one final twist: As the oceans become more acidic, they're less able to absorb our carbon-dioxide emissions.The WMO says the ocean's ability to take up carbon is just 70% of what it was back before the Industrial Revolution. That capacity is expected to shrink to 20% by the end of the century. -- estimating impact on reefs and marine life -- scientists can sift through the fossil record to see how broad ocean ecosystems responded to real-life bouts of ocean acidification in the past. About 55 million years ago, carbon-dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere spiked (for natural reasons), leading to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. In a 2013 study for Science, Norris and his co-authors found that this prehistoric world had few coral reefs, poorly oxygenated oceans, and a food chain that had difficulty sustaining large predators. Not good. On the bright side, there were relatively few mass extinctions. But even this isn't a perfect analogue. Among other things, the rate of ocean acidification today appears to be even faster than it was back then — and there are other stresses on marine life, like overfishing or pollution. So the impacts could be very different.
climate  ocean  geohistory  species  biology 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brad Plumer - Good news: The hole in the ozone layer is finally starting to heal - Vox September 2014
Estimate it will be healed back to 1980 status by 2050 -- It's worth emphasizing what a close call we had with the ozone layer. When scientists first began measuring ozone concentrations in the Antarctic region in the 1960s and 1970s, the readings were so unexpectedly low that researchers thought the instruments were simply wrong. It wasn't until 1974 that chemists Mario Molina and Sherwood Rowland published a paper linking the depleted ozone levels with the fact that concentrations of CFCs were lingering in the atmosphere for a long time. But this connection was difficult to prove — and it was fiercely disputed by Dupont, the world's biggest manufacturer of CFCs, for years. -- Fortunately, that didn't happen. As part of the Montreal Protocol of 1987, the nations of the world agreed to ban the production of CFCs used in refrigerators, spray cans, insulation foam and fire suppression — and eventually phase out their use. -- in many cases, companies and countries stopped using CFCs and started using HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons) as a replacement. As it turns out, HCFCs are a potent greenhouse gas that can contribute to global warming. So, in a sense, we've swapped out one problem for another. -- Currently, there's a push to revisit the Montreal Protocol and phase out HFCs and HCFCs in favor of chemicals that neither hurt the ozone layer nor contribute to global warming.
climate  global_governance  international_organizations  diplomacy  diplomacy-environment  regulation-enforcement  regulation-harmonization 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brad Plumer - Carbon-dioxide levels in the atmosphere rose at a record pace in 2013 - Vox September 2014
Levels of carbon-dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere rose at a record pace in 2013, setting the stage for "potentially devastating" climate change in the decades ahead, the World Meteorological Organization warned Tuesday. There are two possible reasons why the amount of carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere is growing so rapidly. One is obvious: Humans continue to emit more and more carbon-dioxide from power plants, cars, and factories each year. But the other reason is a bit more surprising: According to the WMO, early data suggests that the world's oceans and forests are now absorbing less of our extra carbon-dioxide than they used to — which means that more of it ends up in the atmosphere, where it traps heat and warms up the planet. Traditionally, oceans and forests have acted as giant sponges, soaking up roughly half of our carbon-dioxide emissions. (Indeed, that's why oceans are now acidifying at the fastest rate in 300 million years, with dire consequences for marine life.) But if they're now less able to absorb all our extra carbon-dioxide, it could mean we're in for even more global warming going forward.
climate  ocean 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brad Plumer - Map: How climate change could put hundreds of bird species at risk - Vox September 2014
The National Audubon Society has a big new report out today looking at how 588 different bird species across North America will see their habitats shift because of global warming. Of those, the report finds, 314 species are likely to lose more than half their current climactic range by 2080. That's a dramatic change, and it's not clear whether all of those birds will be able to survive the shift.
climate  biology  maps 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
SSRN Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), Fourth Biennial Global Conference
The Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) was held in Bern and hosted by the World Trade Institute (WTI) of the University of Bern, from 10-12 July 2014. You can browse all SIEL Fourth Biennial Global Conference abstracts in the SSRN eLibrary. The Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) is a new organization aimed at academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials in the field of IEL, in all parts of the world. The broad goals and objectives of the organization include: building links and networks between and among IEL academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials; fostering the development of local IEL expertise and IEL organizations where needed; representing the discipline of international economic law as appropriate in global, regional and national fora; and encouraging research, practice, service and teaching in the field of IEL.
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_organizations  development  trade-policy  trade-agreements  WTO  global_governance  international_political_economy  reform-legal  institutional_economics  international_finance  capital_markets  capital_flows  climate  energy  ocean  treaties 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
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