dunnettreader + class_conflict   38

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
« Lectures. », Mil neuf cent. Revue d'histoire intellectuelle 1/2013 (n° 31) , p. 159-184 - Cairn.info
Titres recensés -- Jacques Julliard, Les gauches françaises, 1762-2012. Histoire, politique et imaginaire, Paris, Flammarion, 2012, 942 p.
Nathalie Richard, Hippolyte Taine. Histoire, psychologie, littérature, Classiques Garnier, 2013, 316 p.
Jean Jaurès, Œuvres, XIII, L’armée nouvelle, Jean-Jacques Becker (ed.), Paris, Fayard, 2013, 574 p.
Olivier Cosson, Préparer la Grande Guerre. L’armée française et la guerre russo-japonaise (1899-1914), Paris, Éd. Les Indes savantes, 2013, 380 p.
Géraldi Leroy, Charles Péguy. L’inclassable, Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 366 p.
Gabriel Tarde, Sur le sommeil. Ou plutôt sur les rêves, Jacqueline Carroy, Louise Salmon (eds.), Lausanne, Éd. BHMS, 2009, 223 p.
Émile Durkheim, Hobbes a? l’agre?gation. Un cours d’E?mile Durkheim suivi par Marcel Mauss, Paris, Éd. de l’EHESS, coll. « Audiographie », 2011, 64 p.
Michel Murat, Frédéric Worms (eds.), Alain, littérature et philosophie mêlées, Paris, Éd. Rue d’Ulm-Presses de l’École normale supérieure, 2012, 221 p.
Frédéric Audren, Christian Chêne, Nicolas Mathey, Arnaud Vergne (eds.), Raymond Saleilles et au-delà, Paris, Dalloz, coll. « Thèmes
human_rights  representative_institutions  ultramontane  WWII  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  elites  philosophy-French  radicals  laïcité  socialism  France  anarchism  class_conflict  pre-WWI  republicanism  education  reviews  post-WWII  anti-clericalism  French_Revolution-impact  political_history  political_culture  political_press  materialism  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_lit  social_theory  books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_participation  historiography-19thC  historiography  social_history  education-higher  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  downloaded  social_sciences  Catholics-France  Bonapartism  justice  rule_if_law  19thC 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
André Lang - La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines (2005) - Cairn.info
I - L’anacyclosis révisée
II - Les constitutions à l’épreuve de l’histoire
III - Le retour au principe
IV - Le moment Romuléen et le moment Numéen
V - Le principe comme puissance de régénération
VI - Les exécutions ou l’équivoque politique du retour à l’origine
VII - Brutus ou la part souveraine de la violence des principes
De l’exécution à l’exécutif : conclusion et perspectives
Pour citer cet article

Lang André, « La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 213-230
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-213.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0213.
Aristotle  class_conflict  political_participation  Pocock  Polybius  corruption  state_of_exception  republicanism  violence  article  norms  dialectic-historical  common_good  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  interest_groups  civic_virtue  downloaded  politics-and-history  mixed_government  historical_change  history_as_examples  cyclical_history  rule_of_law  cycles  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Alvin Gouldner: "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science" | Ralph Dumain: "The Autodidact Project"
Gouldner, Alvin W. "Romanticism and Classicism: Deep Structures in Social Science," in For Sociology: Renewal and Critique in Sociology Today (New York: Basic Books, 1973), Chapter 11, pp. 323-366. Bibliographical note, pp. 464-465. -- "Bibliographical Note (by A Gouldner) -- 'Romanticism and Classicism' is part of my ongoing, larger commitment to the study of the origins of Western social theory. This essay is the programmatic statement that has been guiding my joint work on Romanticism with Nedra Carp these last few years. Previouly unpublished." -- Dumain copied the text from the 1973 book of Gouldner's collected essays
social_theory  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  18thC  19thC  20thC  Romanticism  German_Idealism  Hegel  Hegelian-Left  elites  elite_culture  historicism  historical_sociology  Hellenophiles  Antiquarianism  classicism  Methodenstreit  Gouldner  class_conflict 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Dunn, ed. - The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (1992) | Cambridge University Press
The central problem of modern government and political action is how to choose and implement effective economic policies. For this reason, the economic considerations of public policy have assumed a more prominent place in contemporary political thought. Despite efforts among political scientists, economists, and sociologists to fathom the complexities of this added dimension, none of these solid sciences offers a satisfying approach to the problem. This volume attempts to display the historical novelty and intellectual importance of this dilemma, to uncover its origins, and to procure a remedy through a clearer and steadier focus. The book's contributors range from historians of ideas to economic theorists, who bring the approach of their own intellectual discipline to bear upon the issue. **--** Introduction, John Dunn *-* 1. The economic limits to modern politics, John Dunn *-* 2. The wealth of one nation and the dynamics of international competition, Istvan Hont *-* 3. The political limits to pre-modern politics, J. G. A. Pocock *-* 4. The economic constraints on political programs, Frank H. Hahn *-* 5. International liberalism reconsidered, Robert O. Keohane *-* 6. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy: compatibilities and contradictions John Dunn. -- ebook Adobe Reader - not clear whether in kindle format -- excerpt (10 ogs Intro) downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  economic_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  capitalism  competition-interstate  economic_growth  development  raison-d'-état  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  trade  trade-policy  Great_Divergence  economic_theory  political_culture  economic_culture  macroeconomic_policy  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  collective_action  property_rights  Labor_markets  redistribution  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  Davenant  Smith  social_order  social_democracy  liberalism  elites-political_influence  IR_theory  globalization  international_political_economy  public_finance  public_goods  class_conflict  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Must-Read: Sharun Mukand and Dani Rodrik: The Political Economy of Liberal Democracy - Washington Center for Equitable Growth
We distinguish between… property rights, political rights, and civil rights… …Liberal democracy is that it protects civil rights (equality before the law for minorities) in addition to the other two. Democratic transitions are typically the product of a settlement between the elite (who care mostly about property rights) and the majority (who care mostly about political rights). Such settlements rarely produce liberal democracy, as the minority has neither the resources nor the numbers to make a contribution at the bargaining table. We develop a formal model to sharpen the contrast between electoral and liberal democracies…. We discuss… the difference between social mobilizations sparked by industrialization and decolonization. Since the latter revolve around identity cleavages rather than class cleavages, they are less conducive to liberal politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  liberal_democracy  civil_liberties  rights-legal  rights-political  human_rights  democratization  transition_economies  elites-political_influence  property_rights  property-confiscations  identity_politics  decolonization  post-colonial  industrialization  LDCs  emerging_markets  development  economic_growth  political_economy  political_culture  majoritarian  minorities  class_conflict  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Duvoux, interview with Erik Olin Wright - Analytic Marxism and Real Utopias | Books & ideas - 16 November 2012
Erik Olin Wright is a prominent American sociologist and the last president of the American Sociological Association. In this interview, E. O. Wright explains the nature of "analytic Marxism”, which renewed the study of Marxism in the late 1970s and 1980s, and comes back on a more recent project called “ Envisioning Real Utopias”, which focuses on radical emancipatory alternatives to existing social structures. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  Marxist-analytical  social_sciences-post-WWII  methodology  sociology  classes  class_conflict  capitalism  capitalism-alternatives  Labor_markets  labor  labor_share  cooperation  worker_co-ops  open_source  social_movements  social_order  change-social  change-economic  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Xavier Marquez -Cicero and the Stability of States by (2010) :: SSRN
Victoria University of Wellington -- APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper -- History of Political Thought, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 397-423, 2011 -- I argue for the originality and interest of Cicero’s views on the stability of political communities. After a survey of ancient ideas on the mixed constitution (the framework for thinking about the stability of political communities in the ancient world), I show how Cicero adapted these ideas to analyze the Roman situation of his time. Cicero’s version of the theory of the mixed constitution is notable for two innovations: an argument that stability is possible even under conditions of high inequality, and an account of constitutional mixture that emphasizes the role of the “monarchic” element in promoting concord and stability and meeting unexpected challenges. I show, however, that this account unfortunately made it clear that the Roman crisis of Cicero’s time was more or less insoluble in ways that would preserve the republic. -- PDF File: 42 pgs -- Keywords: Cicero, History of Political Thought, States, Stability, Plato, Aristotle -- downloaded to Dropbox
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  Cicero  Plato  Aristotle  stability  Roman_Republic  government-forms  adaptability  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  inequality  class_conflict  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Nitzan - Global Capital: Political Economy of Capitalist Power (YorkU, Graduate Seminar, Fall Term, 2014-15) | bnarchives
The seminar has two related goals: substantive and pedagogical. The substantive purpose is to tackle the question of capital head on. The course explores a spectrum of liberal and Marxist theories, ideologies and dogmas – as well as a radical alternative to these views. The argument is developed theoretically, historically and empirically. The first part of the seminar provides a critical overview of political economy, examining its historical emergence, triumph and eventual demise. The second part deals with the two ‘materialistic’ schools of capital – the liberal theory of utility and the Marxist theory of labour time – dissecting their structure, strengths and limitations. The third part brings power back in: it analyses the relation between accumulation and sabotage, studies the institutions of the corporation and the state and introduces a new framework – the capitalist mode of power. The final part offers an alternative approach – the theory of capital as power – and illustrates how this approach can shed light on conflict-ridden processes such as corporate merger, stagflation, imperialism and Middle East wars. Pedagogically, the seminar seeks to prepare students toward conducting their own independent re-search. Students are introduced to various electronic data sources, instructed in different methods of analysis and tutored in developing their empirical research skills. As the seminar progresses, these skills are used both to assess various theories and to develop the students’ own theoretical/empirical research projects. -- Keywords: arms accumulation capital capitalism conflict corporation crisis distribution elite energy finance globalization growth imperialism GPE liberalism Marxism military Mumford national interest neoclassical neoliberalism oil ownership peace power profit ruling class security stagflation state stock market technology TNC Veblen violence war -- syllabus and session handouts downloaded pdf to Note
bibliography  syllabus  capital_as_power  international_political_economy  political_economy  economic_theory  liberalism  neoliberalism  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  capital  capitalism  social_theory  power-asymmetric  globalization  financial_system  financial_regulation  risk-systemic  international_finance  finance_capital  financialization  production  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  inequality  MNCs  corporations  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  corporate_control_markets  economic_growth  economic_models  imperialism  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  ruling_class  class_conflict  energy  energy-markets  MENA  accumulation  accumulation-differential  capital_markets  public_finance  profit  investment  technology  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  capitalism-systemic_crisis  Veblen  Mumford  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Nitzan, Jonathan - LSE Public Event: Can Capitalists Afford Recovery? -- Video and Paper (May 2014) | bnarchives
Presentation at the LSE Department of International Relations. 27 May 2014. -- Theorists and policymakers from all directions and of all persuasions remain obsessed with the prospect of recovery. For mainstream economists, the key question is how to bring about such a recovery. For heterodox political economists, the main issue is whether sustained growth is possible to start with. But there is a prior question that nobody seems to ask: can capitalists afford recovery in the first place? If we think of capital not as means of production but as a mode of power, we find that accumulation thrives not on growth and investment, but on unemployment and stagnation. And if accumulation depends on crisis, why should capitalists want to see a recovery? -- Video duration: 2:24 hours -- Keywords: crisis, differential accumulation, economic policy, economic theory, expectations, growth, income distribution, Keynesianism, Marxism, monetarism, neoclassical economics, profit, underconsumption -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Power, BN Region - North America, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Macro, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Ideology, BN Distribution, BN Methodology, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- links to LSE on YouTube -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  video  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  economic_growth  capital_as_power  capitalism-systemic_crisis  economic_theory  economic_models  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  monetarism  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  austerity  sovereign_debt  public_finance  public_policy  productivity  production  consumer_demand  underconsumption  investment  profit  productivity-labor_share  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  finance_capital  financialization  capitalization  accumulation  accumulation-differential  elites-self-destructive  elite_culture  ruling_class  class_conflict  Labor_markets  inequality  unemployment 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Hyeng-Joon Park - Korea’s Post-1997 Restructuring: An Analysis of Capital as Power | forthcoming in Review of Radical Political Economics (2015) pp. 1-44 | bnarchives
This paper aims to transcend current debates on Korea’s post-1997 restructuring, which rely on a dichotomy between domestic industrial capital and foreign financial capital, by adopting Nitzan and Bichler’s capital-as-power perspective. Based on this approach, the paper analyzes Korea’s recent political economic restructuring as the latest phase in the evolution of capitalist power and its transformative regimes of capital accumulation. -- Keywords: differential accumulation dominant capital chaebols transnationalization strategic sabotage -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Institutions, BN Power, BN International & Global, BN Region - Asia, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Distribution, BN Comparative, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- downloaded from author's blog to Note
article  international_political_economy  capital_as_power  globalization  Korea  East_Asia  20thC  21stC  economic_history  1990s  2000s  2010s  Asian_crisis  Asia_Pacific  international_finance  FDI  finance_capital  financialization  emerging_markets  oligopoly  chaebols  crony_capitalism  industry  production  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalization  accumulation  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  cross-border  trade  productivity-labor_share  class_conflict  labor_share  Labor_markets  unions  violence  economic_growth  sabotage-by_business  business-and-politics  business-norms  power-asymmetric  public_policy  public_goods  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  investment  banking  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_reform  economic_policy  democracy  opposition  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Bichler, Shimshon and Nitzan, Jonathan - The Asymptotes of Power - Real-World Economics Review. No. 60. June 2012. pp. 18-53 | bnarchives
Article workup of earlier conference paper -- This is the latest in a series of articles we have been writing on the current crisis. The purpose of our previous papers was to characterize the crisis. We claimed that it was a 'systemic crisis', and that capitalists were gripped by 'systemic fear'. In this article, we seek to explain why. The problem that capitalists face today, we argue, is not that their power has withered, but, on the contrary, that their power has increased. Indeed, not only has their power increased, it has increased by so much that it might be approaching its asymptote. And since capitalists look not backward to the past but forward to the future, they have good reason to fear that, from now on, the most likely trajectory of this power will be not up, but down. The paper begins by setting up our general framework and key concepts. It continues with a step-by-step deconstruction of key power processes in the United States, attempting to assess how close these processes are to their asymptotes. And it concludes with brief observations about what may lie ahead. -- Keywords: capitalization distribution power, systemic crisis -- Subjects: BN Money & Finance, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Distribution, BN Resistance, BN Power, BN Region - North America, BN Business Enterprise, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Value & Price, BN Class, BN Crisis -- downloaded pdf to Note, also Excel data sheet
article  international_political_economy  capital_as_power  financial_system  international_finance  global_economy  global_system  ruling_class  transnational_elites  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  globalization  power-asymmetric  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  finance_capital  financialization  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  profit  labor_share  risk-systemic  inequality  plutocracy  1-percent  conflict  violence  class_conflict  neoliberalism  corporate_citizenship  systems-complex_adaptive  systems_theory  grassroots  opposition  democracy  democracy_deficit  accumulation  capitalization  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  elites  rebellion  failed_states  property_rights  business-and-politics  business-norms  economic_growth  fear  data  capitalism-systemic_crisis  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
William M. Dugger and William Waller - Radical Institutionalism: From Technological to Democratic Instrumentalism | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 54, No. 2 (SUMMER 1996), pp. 169-189
This article explains the nature and significance of radical institutionalism. Radical institutionalism does not represent a break with the institutionalist paradigm, but an attempt to move it beyond its outmoded, Ayresian philosophical foundation. Radical institutionalism involves the introduction of three new elements into the contemporary stream of institutionalist works. These three new elements include an emphasis on Veblenian fundamentals, a shift in research interests, and a reconsideration of the philosophical foundations of inquiry. -- useful bibliography of generations of institutionalist theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  economic_theory  economic_history  institutional_economics  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  capitalism  corporations  welfare_state  democracy  Veblen  class_conflict  financialization  ruling_class  postmodern  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  critical_realism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (2012) Kindle Price:$17.60 - 840 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Includes Scottish late transition from feudalism and a different angle on Scot and English historiography in 17thC re "feudal law", "ancient constitution", James I & VI etc than Pocock's version -- earlier books on 16thC-18thC Scotland look very interesting -- In this panoramic historical analysis, Davidson defends a renovated concept of bourgeois revolution. He shows how our globalized societies of the present are the result of a contested, turbulent history marked by often forceful revolutions directed against old social orders, from the Dutch Revolt to the English and American Civil Wars and beyond. -- Review *--* " What should our conception of a bourgeois revolution be, if it is to enlighten rather than to mislead ? Davidson’s instructive and provocative answer is given through a history both of a set of concepts and of those social settings in which they found application.His book is an impressive contribution both to the history of ideas and to political philosophy.” —ALASDAIR MACINTYRE. *--* “Davidson wends his way through the jagged terrain of a wide range of Marxist writings and debates to distill their lessons in what is unquestionably the most thorough discussion of the subject to date. If the paradox at the heart of the bourgeois revolutions was that the emergence of the modern bourgeois state had little to do with the agency of the bourgeoisie, then Davidson’s study is by far the most nuanced and illuminating discussion of this complex fact.” —JAIRUS BANAJI, Theory as History “[This] is a monumental work. ...easily the most comprehensive account yet of the ‘life and times’ of the concept of ‘bourgeois revolution.’ . . . He has also provided us with a refined set of theoretical tools for understanding the often complex interactions between political revolutions which overturn state institutions and social revolutions which involve a more thoroughgoing transformation of social relations.” —COLIN MOOERS, The Making of Bourgeois Europe
books  kindle-available  buy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_history  social_history  intellectual_history  social_order  Europe-Early_Modern  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Marxist  Dutch_Revolt  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1745_rebellion  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  German_unification  Italian_unification  Russian_revolution  class_conflict  feudalism  ancient_constitution  aristocracy  Ancien_régime  liberalism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_Civil_War  political_culture  political_economy  capitalism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Structuralist Response to Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century | INET
New School Economist Lance Taylor released a symposium of literature on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century in conjunction with the INET-sponsored research project on Economic Sustainability, Distribution and Stability. It includes papers offering a structuralist response to Piketty's explanation of inequality and advancing alternative theories. **--** Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century: Introduction to a Structuralist Symposium - Lance Taylor (The New School) *--* Capitalism, Inequality and Globalization: Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century - Prabhat Patnaik (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi *--* Elasticity of substitution and social conflict: a structuralist note on Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century - Nelson Barbosa-Filho (São Paulo School of Economics) *--* Piketty’s Elasticity of Substitution: A Critique - Gregor Semieniuk (The New School) *--* The Triumph of the Rentier? Thomas Piketty vs. Luigi Pasinetti and John Maynard Keynes - Lance Taylor (The New School -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  Piketty  economic_history  institutional_economics  class_conflict  rentiers  inequality  globalization  capital  capitalism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Suzanne J. Konzelmann - The political economics of austerity | Cambridge Journal of Economics 2013
Birkbeck, University of London. -- The 2007/08 financial crisis has reignited the debate about economic austerity. With the aim of understanding why a government would pursue such a policy in the current context of persistent economic recession, this article traces the social, political and economic developments that have together shaped the evolution of ideas about austerity, from the earliest theorising by the classical political economists some 300 years ago. Throughout the historical narrative, important analytical themes revolve around the arguments used to justify austerity—notably appeals to ethics and morality (reinforced by misleading analogies drawn between government budgets and the accounts of firms and households). These include concerns about inflation and the observed relationship between inflation and unemployment; ‘Ricardian equivalence’ and ‘non-Keynesian’ effects of austerity; and the correlation between public debt levels and economic growth. The class analytics of austerity—who bears the burden of austerity and who benefits—and the process by which alternative ideas penetrate the mainstream and reconstitute the conventional wisdom are also important analytical themes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  economic_theory  economic_sociology  economic_policy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Great_Recession  austerity  business_cycles  business-and-politics  ideology  macroeconomics  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  inflation  unemployment  moral_economy  historical_sociology  class_conflict  public_opinion  public_finance  sovereign_debt  economic_growth  debt  debtors  creditors  intermediation  Labor_markets  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Ford, Jane (2013) Vampiric enterprise: metaphors of economic exploitation in the literature and culture of the fin de siecle. PhD thesis, University of Portsmouth.
This thesis is about the complex network of metaphors that emerged around late 19thC conceptions of economic self-interest — predatory, conflictual and exploitative basis of relations between nations, institutions, sexes and people in an outwardly belligerent fin-de-siècle economy. This thesis is about the vampire, cannibal and related genera of economic metaphor which penetrate many of the major discourses of the period. In chapters that examine socialist fiction and newspapers; the imperial quest romance; inter-personal intimacies in the writing of Henry James and Vernon Lee; and the Catholic novels of Lucas Malet, I assess the breadth and variety of these metaphors, and consider how they filter the concept of the conflictual ‘economic man’ . The thesis builds on Maggie Kilgour’s "From communion to cannibalism: an anatomy of metaphors of incorporation" (1990), which traces the genealogy – in literature from Homer to Melville – of what she terms ‘metaphors of incorporation’. These are metaphors that originate from a inside-outside binary and involve the assimilation or incorporation of an external reality. Kilgour attempts to demonstrate that with the increasing isolation of the modern individual .. acts of ‘incorporation’ previously imagined as symbiotic, were later conceived as cannibalistic. --However, deploying a combination of historicist and, at times, Post-Structuralist approaches, this thesis demonstrates that these metaphors refuse to accommodate themselves to a simple unified vision of the kind advanced by Kilgour. I map the complexities of these metaphors, explaining how they originate from divergent teleological impulses and how they articulate both simple ideological operations, and more complex feelings of ambivalence about economic realities in the cultural moment of the Victorian fin-de-siècle.
thesis  cultural_history  literary_history  social_history  political_history  IR_theory  IR  19thC  Fin-de-Siècle  20thC  political_economy  political_press  fiction  novels  James_Henry  laisser-faire  domination  imperialism  homo_economicus  socialism  class_conflict  individualism  alienation  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Thompson - After the Fall: Class and Political Language in Britain, 1780-1900 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 785-806
The fall of class in nineteenth-century British history has become a familiar tale. Its rise in the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain has been less noted. This essay explores the reasons for this divergence and emphasizes its methodological origins. It highlights the need for a comprehensive history of class society and identity to replace the confused and contradictory picture of particular classes and communities that is currently on offer. To understand better the constitution of class society, it urges historians to talk less of consciousness and more of identity and to recognize that class is an imagined community much like any other. It proceeds to use this understanding of class identity to assess the turn to political language amongst social historians interested in class. The paper offers a sustained examination of the recent work of Joyce and Wahrman in particular and argues that insufficient attention has been paid to the variety of usable political languages and to the particular discursive contexts in which they are employed. It is argued that to acknowledge that class is so constructed is not to deny its existence or its importance and that historians need to look beyond political discourse to explain how class became so central to the self and the social in the nineteenth century. -- extensive references on British social history as well as postmodern historiography debates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  social_history  political_history  cultural_history  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  classes  class_conflict  working_class  middle_class  lower_orders  elites  elite_culture  popular_culture  bourgeoisie  identity  identity_politics  political_participation  political_press  rhetoric-political  aristocracy  gentry  gentleman  social_order  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Grumley - Theorizing Modernity: Unit of Study Guide 2014 - Sydney, Australia
Lecture notes on each class plus extensive reading lists, - see especially the post on alternative paper questions, each with a reading list -- PHIL 2633 Theorising Modernity -- The popular image of 19th century modernity was of a speeding locomotive clear of form, direction and ultimate destination. In reality, however, and despite unbounded optimism, the great thinkers of the 19th century were at least aware of deep contradictions and these tempered their assessments of modernity. This course will survey the best of these classical theories to discover to what extent they were able to capture the contradictions and problems we know only too well. The work of Hegel, de Tocqueville, Marx and Nietzsche will serve as paradigmatic attempts to discover the essence of modernity. Recurring themes and features will be examined through the prism of these thinkers: these include questions of meaning after the collapse of tradition, and problems arising from capitalism, industrialisation, the nation-state, democracy, bureaucratisation, individualism and the rise of secularism-- their main tendencies, antinomies and problems. The course will demonstrate how much we owe these thinkers for our understanding of modernity, as well as, considering their respective shortcomings from a contemporary perspective.
intellectual_history  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  Marx  Nietzsche  modernity  Industrial_Revolution  individualism  secularization  nation-state  nationalism  democracy  mass_culture  elite_culture  class_conflict  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  social_process  historicism  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Clarles Andrews Professor Piketty Fights Orthodoxy and Attacks Inequality | Marxist-Leninist thought today - May 2014
First, the world wars were themselves not accidental. WWI was an inevitable outcome of early monopoly capitalism, and WWII was a continuation of the first as well as capital's attempt to obliterate the first socialist society. -- Second, Piketty's almost exclusive metrics are inequality of income and wealth. They are important, to be sure. Let us remember, though, that despite less inequality, most of the period 1913-1950 was hellish for the masses in the capitalist world. They died by millions in WWI, made little economic progress in the 1920s, suffered the hunger of the Great Depression in the 1930s, and died by millions more in WWII. On the other hand, while inequality was high in the late 19thC and up to 1913, the working class did make advances, by militant class struggle largely under the socialist banner, in obtaining fruits of industrial progress.And there is justified nostalgia today for the era after Piketty's exceptional period. In the 1950s and 1960s life got better for a majority of the working people in the US, Britain, and western Europe. The peak of working-class progress was 1973 – after Piketty's focus and years before neoliberalism, financialization, and globalization. Since 1973, real median earnings in the US have stagnated and fallen. That turning point is the fact that demands explanation and action. Piketty recalls the two world wars often. He buries the fact that WWI triggered the first successful socialist revolution in Russia, and WWII provided openings for anti-imperialist and sometimes socialist revolutions, ...
books  reviews  Piketty  political_economy  economic_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  capitalism  WWI  WWII  Great_Depression  labor  class_conflict  unions  revolutions  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  neoliberalism  inequality  wages  Marxist  social_order  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (2012) eBook: Amazon.com
Biddick explores the 19thC foundations of medieval studies as an academic discipline as well as certain unexamined contemporary consequences of these origins. By pairing debates over current academic trends and issues with innovative readings of medieval texts, Biddick exposes the presuppositions of the field of medieval studies and significantly shifts the objects of its historical inquiry. Biddick describes how the discipline of medieval studies was defined by a process of isolation and exclusion—a process that not only ignored significant political and cultural issues of the 19thC but also removed the period from the forces of history itself. Wanting to separate themselves from popular studies of medieval culture, and valuing their own studies as scientific, 19thC academics created an exclusive discipline whose structure is consistently practiced today, despite the denials of most contemporary medieval scholars. Biddick supports her argument by discussing the unavowed melancholy that medieval Christians felt for Jews and by revealing the unintentional irony of nineteenth-century medievalists’ fabrication of sentimental objects of longing (such as the “gothic peasant”). The subsequent historical distortions of this century-old sentimentality, the relevance of worker dislocation during the industrial revolution, and other topics lead to a conclusion in which Biddick considers the impact of an array of factors on current medieval studies. Simultaneously displacing disciplinary stereotypes and altering an angle of historical inquiry, this book will appeal to readers who are interested in how historicizing processes can affect the development of academic disciplines
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  medieval_history  19thC  historicism  social_history  economic_culture  political_culture  intelligentsia  Industrial_Revolution  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  academia  disciplines  scientism  national_ID  folklore  nostalgia  sentimentalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - globalinequality: Limits of neoclassical economics - June 2014
Great summary of the obvious that unfortunately needs to be said -- When people criticize Piketty for elevating a mere economic identity... to a Fundamental Law of Capitalism they show their inability to go back to economics as a social science [and] transcend neoclassical economics. The share of capital income in total income is not only a reflection of the fact that people with a factor of production B have so much, and people with the factor of production A have the rest.. We are basically saying: 20% of people ..claim 1/2 of national output and they do so without having to work. If it were a question of changing the distribution in favor of factor A (donuts) and against factor B (pecan pies), there would be no reason to be concerned. But here you change the distribution in favor of those who do not need to work, and against those that do. You thereby affect the entire social structure of society. This is where social science comes in, and neoclassical economics goes away. The entire 100 years of neoclassical economics [has made us] us forget this key distinction: between having or not having to work for a living. Hence neoclassicists like to treat capital (and labor) as basically the same thing: factors of production: a donut and a pecan pie...Thence also the attempt to treat labor as human capital. We are all capitalists now: a guy who works at Walmart for less than the minimum wage is a capitalist since he is using his human capital; a broker who makes a million in a day is also a capitalist, he just works with a different type of capital.The true social reality was thus entirely hidden. [Picketty returns us to] social science and you ask yourself questions like, would a society where 20% of non-workers earn 70% of total income be okay? What are the values that such a society would promote? (..more political, moral philosophy Qs)
Piketty  19thC  20thC  21stC  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  social_theory  social_sciences  political_economy  social_order  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  classical_economics  Marx  inequality  distribution-income  capitalism  capital  labor  human_capital  markets_in_everything  class_conflict  economic_culture  political_culture  economic_sociology  bad_economics  memory-group 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Suresh Naidu - Capital Eats the World | Jacobin May 2014
A first step could be a multisector model with both a productive sector and an extractive, rent-seeking outlet for investment, so that the rate of return on capital has the potential to be unanchored from the growth of the economy. This model could potentially do a better job of explaining r > g in a world where capital has highly profitable opportunities in rent-seeking ....More fundamentally, a model that started with the financial and firm-level institutions underneath the supply and demand curves for capital, rather than blackboxing them in production and utility functions, could illuminate complementarities among the host of other political demands that would claw back the share taken by capital and lower the amount paid out as profits before the fiscal system gets its take. This is putting meat on what Brad Delong calls the “wedge” between the actual and warranted rate of profit. -- We need even more and even better economics to figure out which of these may get undone via market responses and which won’t, and to think about them jointly with the politics that make each feasible or not. While Piketty’s book diagnoses the problem of capital’s voracious appetite, it would require a different kind of model to take our focus off the nominal quantities registered by state fiscal systems, and instead onto the broader distribution of political power in the world economy.
books  reviews  kindle-available  Piketty  political_economy  economic_theory  heterodox_economics  neoclassical_economics  economic_models  economic_growth  wealth  capital  finance_capital  capitalism  labor  Labor_markets  unemployment  markets_in_everything  tax_havens  investment  investors  savings  inheritance  profit  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  inequality  technology  1-percent  rent-seeking  rentiers  class_conflict  oligarchy  taxes  productivity  corporate_finance  property  property_rights  neoliberalism 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Daron Acemoglu, Suresh Naidu, Pascual Restrepo, James A Robinson - Can democracy help with inequality? | vox 7 February 2014
Paper on NBER -- Inequality is currently a prominent topic of debate in Western democracies. In democratic countries, we might expect rising inequality to be partially offset by an increase in political support for redistribution. This column argues that the relationship between democracy, redistribution, and inequality is more complicated than that. Elites in newly democratised countries may hold on to power in other ways, the liberalisation of occupational choice may increase inequality among previously excluded groups, and the middle classes may redistribute income away from the poor as well as the rich.
paper  political_economy  democracy  development  inequality  class_conflict  neoliberalism  middle_class  redistribution  oligarchy  marginalized_groups  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's 2009 Voltaire lecture on 'The Guilt of Science?: Race, Science and Darwinism'
By the end of the eighteenth century, then, scientists had constructed a taxonomy of nature into which humans could be fitted and out of which emerged the categories of race. This seems to lend credibility to the view that it is modernity itself, and in particular the Enlightenment, that give rise both to the idea of race and to the practice of racism. ‘Eighteenth century Europe was the cradle of racism’, the historian George Mosse, argues because ‘racism has its foundations’ in the Enlightenment ‘preoccupation with a rational universe, nature and aesthetics.’ To see why this is not the case, we need to look more closely at how Enlightenment thinkers viewed the concept of human differences. -- If any event could demonstrate the folly of giving into unreason, it is surely Nazism and the Holocaust. Yet now it is regarded as an expression of too much reason.There is no intrinsic link between the idea of race and a rational or scientific view of the world. On the contrary: what made ideas of race plausible were the growth of political sentiments hostile to both the rationalism and the humanism of the Enlightenment.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  racialism  species  biology  evolutionary_biology  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  reason  Nazis  Holocaust  imperialism  slavery  civilizing_process  human_nature  diversity  historiography-18thC  social_theory  Social_Darwinism  Herder  Linnaeus  Locke  essentialism  essence  climate  stadial_theories  Romanticism  social_order  progress  atheism_panic  authority  class_conflict  bourgeoisie  liberalism  capitalism  equality  stratification  scientism  science_of_man  science-and-religion  positivism  social_sciences  France  Britain  British_Empire  Germany  Great_Powers  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Understanding Society: The Brenner debate revisited - Jan 2010
Very useful summary of the various causal theories re transition to capitalist agriculture and difference between England and France - though couched as Brenner debate it is much broader and slides into Great Divergence, rise of the West, etc -- But it seems clear in hindsight that these are false dichotomies. We aren't forced to choose: Malthus, Marx, or Smith. Economic development is not caused by a single dominant factor -- a point that Guy Bois embraces in his essay (Aston and Philpin, 117). Rather, all these factors were in play in European economic development -- and several others as well. (For example, Ken Pomeranz introduces the exploitation of the natural resources, energy sources, and forced labor of the Americas in his account of the economic growth of Western Europe (The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World Economy). And I suppose that it would be possible to make a climate-change argument for this period of change as well.) Moreover, each large factor (population, prices, property relations) itself is the complex result of a number of great factors -- including the others on the list. So we shouldn't expect simple causal diagrams of large outcomes like sustained economic growth.
social_theory  economic_history  feudalism  capitalism  British_history  France  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  Great_Divergence  agriculture  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  property_rights  entrepreneurs  class_conflict  economic_growth  causation-social  links  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Todd Cronan, lead remarks& forum - Do We Need Adorno? | nonsite.org
Participants - Todd Cronan, Emory University, Michael W. Clune, Case Western Reserve University, Nicholas Brown, UIC, Jennifer Ashton, UIC, Chris Cutrone, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Marnin Young, Yeshiva University
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_history  political_economy  economic_theory  US_economy  Marx  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  classes  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  human_capital  neoliberalism  inequality  domination  Communist_Party  alienation  cultural_critique  Leftist  labor  leisure  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Jessica Warner and Frank Ivis - "Damn You, You Informing Bitch." Vox Populi and the Unmaking of the Gin Act of 1736 | JSTOR: Journal of Social History, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Winter, 1999), pp. 299-330
This study examines the interaction between legislation and popular culture, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which popular resistance undermined enforcement of the Gin Act of 1736. It is argued that popular resistance, while significant, had no effect on policy until members of the middle classes intervened in an attempt to restore the social relations that had existed before the Act took effect. It was only at this point that the Act became a dead letter. In this role members of the middle classes functioned as mediators between two cultures, one plebeian, the other patrician. As such, our findings suggest that the dialectic of plebeian culture and patrician culture, as variously articulated by E.P. Thompson, may be excessively stark, especially when applied to a setting as dense and heterogenous as early Hanoverian London. Our findings also suggest that working men and women in the capital worked and socialized side by side, sometimes as drinking companions, and sometimes as professional informers. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  classes  class_conflict  lower_orders  middle_class  elites  public_policy  Parliament  law_enforcement  London  public_disorder  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  1730s  riots  moral_economy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - The Specter of the Commonalty: Class Struggle and the Commonweal in England before the Atlantic World | JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Apr., 2006), pp. 221-252
Part of what he developed as his book on the long commonwealth tradition and popular politics in England from early medieval period onwards. This article more academic and footnoted, so excellent bibliography as well as shorter version of a key part of his argument. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  kindle  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  15thC  16thC  17thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  popular_politics  populism  riots  commonwealth  body_politic  class_conflict  social_history  historiography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Frank O'Gorman, review essay - Approaches to Hanoverian Society JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 1996), pp. 521-534
(1) Philanthropy and Police: London Charity in the Eighteenth Century by Donna T. Andrew; *--* (2) The Language of Liberty: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World by J. C. D. Clark; *--* (3) Stilling the Grumbling Hive. The Response to Social and Economic Problems in England, 1689-1750 by L. Davison; *--* (4) Riot, Risings and Revolution. Governance and Violence in Eighteenth- Century England by Ian Gilmour; *--* (5) A Patriot Press. National Politics and the London Press in the 1740s by Robert Harris; *--* (6) Judging New Wealth. Popular Publishing and Responses to Commerce in England, 1750-1850 by James Raven; *--* (7)The Local Origins of Modern Society. Gloucestershire 1500-1800 by David Rollison; *--* (8) An Imperial State at War: Britain from 1689 to 1815 by Lawrence Stone; *--* (9) Protest and Survival: The Historical Experience. Essays for E. P. Thompson by John Rule; Robert Malcolmson -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  bookshelf  article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  social_history  political_economy  17thC18thC  19thC  British_politics  British_Empire  UK_economy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  British_foreign_policy  military_history  political_press  class_conflict  local_government  political_philosophy  charity  crime  violence  riots  lower_orders  mercantilism  luxury  status  nouveaux_riches  governing_class  governmentality  fiscal-military_state  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Gourevitch - Labor Republicanism and the Transformation of Work | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 41, No. 4 (August 2013), pp. 591-617
In the nineteenth century a group of "labor republicans" argued that the system of wage-labor should be replaced by a system of cooperative production. This system of cooperative production would realize republican liberty in economic, not just political, life. Today, neo-republicans argue that the republican theory of liberty only requires a universal basic income. A non-dominated ability to exit is sufficient to guarantee free labor. This essay reconstructs the more radical, labor republican view and defends it against the prevailing the neo-republican one. It argues that neorepublicanism lacks an adequate conception of structural domination, which leaves it without theoretical resources to address certain forms of economic domination. The concept of structural domination allows us to comprehend the coherence of the nineteenth century, labor republican view and identify its relevance to modern labor markets. Labor republicanism takes us beyond a universal basic income to a concern with control over productive assets and workplace organization. As such, it shows us how the republican theory of liberty can support an argument for the transformation of work, not just the escape from it. -- paywall Sage
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  19thC  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  neo-Roman  political_economy  class_conflict  liberty  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli's Political Trials and "The Free Way of Life" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Aug., 2007), pp. 385-411
This essay examines the political trials through which, according to Machiavelli's "Discourses", republics should punish magistrates and prominent citizens who threaten or violate popular liberty. Unlike modern constitutions, which assign indictments and appeals to small numbers of government officials, Machiavelli's neo-Roman model encourages individual citizens to accuse corrupt or usurping elites and promotes the entire citizenry as political jury and court of appeal. Machiavellian political justice requires, on the one hand, equitable, legal procedures that serve all citizens by punishing guilty parties and discouraging retaliatory reprisals, including foreign intervention. On the other hand, frankly acknowledging the power disparities that exist in every republic, Machiavelli outlines how political trials enable pro-plebeian magistrates and populist reformers to thwart patrician-generated smear campaigns and oligarchic conspiracies. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  neo-Roman  oligarchy  impeachment  corruption  accountability  rule_of_law  tribune  populism  class_conflict  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli against Republicanism: On the Cambridge School's "Guicciardinian Moments" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 5 (Oct., 2003), pp. 615-643
Scholars loosely affiliated with the "Cambridge School" (e.g., Pocock, Skinner, Viroli, and Pettit) accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism for contemporary politics reinforce rather than reform the "senatorial," electorally based, and socioeconomically agnostic republican model (devised by Machiavelli's aristocratic interlocutor, Guicciardini, and refined by Montesquieu and Madison) that permits common citizens to acclaim but not determine government policies. Cambridge School textual interpretations and practical proposals have little connection with Machiavelli's "tribunate," class-specific model of popular government elaborated in The Discourses, one that relies on extra-electoral accountability techniques and embraces deliberative popular assemblies.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  oligarchy  elites  populism  public_opinion  popular_politics  political_participation  neo-Roman  class_conflict  accountability  tribune  Guiccidarini  Cambridge_School  rule_of_law  common_good  non-domination  liberty  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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