dunnettreader + civil_religion   9

Matteo Bortolini - The trap of intellectual success: Bellah, the American civil religion debate, & sociology of knowledge (2012) | Theory & Society on JSTOR
The trap of intellectual success: Robert N. Bellah, the American civil religion debate, and the sociology of knowledge, Theory and Society, Vol. 41, No. 2 (March 2012), pp. 187-210 -- Current sociology of knowledge tends to take for granted Robert K. Merton's theory ofcumulative advantage: successful ideas bring recognition to their authors, successful authors have their ideas recognized more easily than unknown ones. This article argues that this theory should be revised via the introduction of the differential between the status of an idea and that of its creator: when an idea is more important than its creator, the latter becomes identified with the former, and this will hinder recognition of the intellectual's new ideas as they differ from old ones in their content or style. Robert N. Bellah 's performance during the "civil religion debate" of the 1970s is reconstructed as an example of how this mechanism may work. Implications for further research are considered in the concluding section. — Keywords Intellectuals • Success • Cumulative advantage • Robert N. Bellah • American civil religion -- downloaded via AIr to DBOX
article  downloaded  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  20thC  US_history  post-WWII  1960s  sociology_of_religion  sociology  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  civil_society  US_society  national_ID  national_tale  exceptionalism  universalism  civil_religion 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law [c 1750, tran 1763], trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. Peter Korkman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law, trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. and with an Introduction by Peter Korkman (Indianpolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1717> -- The basis of this version of The Principles of Natural and Politic Law is Thomas Nugent’s 1763 English translation, which became a standard textbook at Cambridge and at many premier American colleges, including Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania. The first scholarly work on Burlamaqui was written by an American, M. Ray Forrest Harvey, who in 1937 argued that Burlamaqui was well known among America’s Founding Fathers and that his writings exerted considerable influence on the American constitutional system. In his introduction, Nugent said of Burlamaqui: “His singular beauty consists in the alliance he so carefully points out between ethics and jurisprudence, religion and politics, after the example of Plato and Tully, and the other illustrious masters of antiquity.”
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  intellectual_history  natural_law  political_philosophy  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  sovereignty  Geneva  Calvinist  natural_rights  mixed_government  aristocracy-natural  elites  bourgeoisie  democracy  authority  legitimacy  civil_liberties  civil_religion  happiness  rationalist  Grotius  Pufendorf  Barbeyrac  Leibniz  Rousseau  governing_class  government-forms  governance  state-building  state-of-nature  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  secularization  religious_culture  Church_of_England  church_history  ecclesiology  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  tolerance  natural_religion  natural_law  Pufendorf  dissenters  Locke  heterodoxy  Leibniz  Barbeyrac  Hutcheson  British_history  Germany  Scottish_Enlightenment  religion-established  religious_wars  Protestants  Huguenots  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_religion  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Coffey - Puritanism and Liberty Revisited: The Case for Toleration in the English Revolution - JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 961-985
In recent years historians have grown sceptical about attempts to trace connections between puritanism and liberty. Puritans, we are told, sought a godly society, not a pluralistic one. The new emphasis has been salutary, but it obscures the fact that a minority of zealous Protestants argued forcefully for the toleration of heresy, blasphemy, Catholicism, non-Christian religions, and even atheism. During the English revolution, a substantial number of Baptists, radical Independents, and Levellers insisted that the New Testament paradigm required the church to be a purely voluntary, non-coercive community in the midst of a pluralistic society governed by a `merely civil' state. Although their position was not without its ambiguities, it constituted a startling break with the Constantinian assumptions of magisterial Protestantism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  religious_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  Levellers  tolerance  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  church_history  New_Testament  apostolic_succession  Early_Christian  theocracy  heterodoxy  pluralism  civil_liberties  civil_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Lee MacLean, The Free Animal: Rousseau on Free Will and Human Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
Two interpretive questions guide MacLean's study: first, whether Rousseau's ascription of free will to humans, especially in the Second Discourse, is to be taken at face value (rather than as part of an esoteric strategy to hide his "true" view from the masses); and second, what implications the ascription or non-ascription of free will has for interpreting his moral and political thought. -- most of book on No. 1, to counter Straussians esoteric reading -- The textual arguments offered here are deft and attentive to nuance, and, unlike most treatments of Rousseau by philosophers, they cover not only his three central philosophical texts, but also less studied works such as Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Chapter 3 contains one of the best extended treatments of Emile's "Savoyard Vicar" that I have read. -- Especially intriguing is the suggestion that the religious views expressed by the Vicar are to be read as playing a crucial role in The Social Contract's argument that a legitimate republic requires a civil religion. -- She demonstrates a sure and confident grasp of Rousseau's texts, including unpublished material. Even more impressive, she knows a surprising amount about the views of Rousseau's contemporaries and predecessors on the topic of free will - Buffon, Montaigne, and Condillac, for example - and she very helpfully brings this knowledge to bear on her carefully constructed interpretations of Rousseau. For this reason her book is a must-read for scholars interested in the historical context within which Rousseau's views develop.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  18thC  Rousseau  free_will  self-love  self-interest  civil_religion  social_contract  Buffon  Condillac  Montaigne  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
DMITRI LEVITIN -- MATTHEW TINDAL'S "RIGHTS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH" (1706) AND THE CHURCH—STATE RELATIONSHIP | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 717-740
Matthew Tindal's Rights of the Christian church (1706), which elicited more than thirty contemporary replies, was a major interjection in the ongoing debates about the relationship between church and state in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Historians have usually seen Tindal's work as an exemplar of the 'republican civil religion' that had its roots in Hobbes and Harrington, and putatively formed the essence of radical whig thought in the wake of the Glorious Revolution. But this is to misunderstand the Rights. To comprehend what Tindal perceived himself as doing we need to move away from the history of putatively 'political' issues to the histories of ecclesiastical jurisprudence, patristic scholarship, and biblical exegesis. The contemporary significance of Tindal's work was twofold: methodologically, it challenged Anglican patristic scholarship as a means of reaching consensus on modern ecclesiological issues; positively, it offered a powerful argument for ecclesiastical supremacy lying in crown-in-parliament, drawing on a legal tradition stretching back to Christopher St Germain (1460—1540) and on Tindal's own legal background. Tindal's text provides a case study for the tentative proposition that 'republicanism', whether as a programme or a 'language', had far less impact on English anticlericalism and contemporary debates over the church—state relationship than the current historiography suggests. -- extensive references of Cambridge_School articles, refers to Goldie a great deal, whether for support of particular episodes or to attack is unclear -- the quarrel over patristic claims of the Church_of_England important for Bolingbroke's argument re Tillotson etc -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  ecclesiology  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  patristic_scholarship  Biblical_exegesis  Erastianism  crown-in-parliament  Whigs-Radicals  anticlerical  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  civil_religion  High_Church  Convocation  Tindal_Matthew  free-thinkers  religious_lit  political_press  pamphlets  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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