dunnettreader + civil_liberties   90

Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Dominique Schaffer - Du progrès indéfini de la démocratie ? (2911) - Cairn.info
Les sociétés démocratiques sont aujourd’hui affectées d’un malaise qui suscite bien des interrogations sur leur avenir. Ce malaise est un produit de la logique interne de ce type de régime. La fragilité est inscrite dans les principes mêmes de la démocratie, dans la mesure où elle peut être pensée comme un épuisement progressif de la transcendance politique, une marche vers l’égalité généralisée et un relativisme des valeurs et des opinions. De cette corruption, nous subissons concrètement en Occident les effets délétères dans notre vie quotidienne ; ils touchent la famille, l’éducation et, de proche en proche, toutes les relations sociales. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
civil_liberties  identity  article  individualism  political_participation  governance  democracy  downloaded  common_good  national_ID  norms  republicanism  declinism  political_philosophy  citizenship 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Timothy Michael - British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason (Dec 2015) | JHU Press
What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. (..) argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Burke, Wollstonecraft, and Godwin, the historical sequence of revolution, counter-revolution, and terror in France—and radicalism and repression in Britain—occasioned a dramatic reassessment of how best to advance the project of enlightenment. The political thought of these figures must be understood, Michael contends, in the context of their philosophical thought. Major poems of the period, including The Prelude, The Excursion, and Prometheus Unbound, are in this reading an adjudication of competing political and epistemological claims. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  British_history  English_lit  political_philosophy  political_culture  Enlightenment  epistemology  moral_philosophy  mind  Romanticism  poetry  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Shelley  Burke  Wollstonecraft  Godwin_Wm  reason  rationality  perception  judgment-political  judgment-independence  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  political_discourse  poetics  rhetoric-political  freedom  civil_liberties  civil_society  liberty-positive  scepticism 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Norbert Lenoir, review - Catherine Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » ( 2011) | Books & ideas - July 2015
Reviewed : C. Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » [Democracy Without ‘Demos‘], PUF, 2011, 256 pages, 27 euros -- French version January 2012 -- translated by Michael C. Behrent -- Democracy is not the government of the people, by the people. Rather, it is a permanent process of conquering new rights. This is the argument of Catherine Colliot-Thélène’s book, which examines the tension, found throughout democracy’s history, between individual emancipation and political affiliation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
reviews  books  French_language  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_liberties  citizens  citizenship  authority  national_ID  identity-multiple  globalization  global_governance  political_culture  political_participation  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Philip Giraldi - Revenge of the Anti-Terror State | The American Conservative - July 2015
In Washington, a favored bit of legislation that doesn’t make it through the committee and onto the floor for a vote can always be tacked on to another bill. Or, if there is some awkwardness about it, it can always be repackaged and given another name. Both of those tactics are currently being employed to revive the Violent Radicalization Act as the The Countering Violent Extremism Act of 2015, which is now being rolled into the renewal of the Homeland Security Act as an amendment. It has also been bureaucratically jiggled, creating an Office for Countering Violent Extremism headed by an Assistant Secretary under the direction of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rather than a commission run by Congress.
Instapaper  military-industrial  bureaucracy  spying  marginalized_groups  Islamophobia  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GWOT  DHS  civil_liberties  US_government  Congress  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Must-Read: Sharun Mukand and Dani Rodrik: The Political Economy of Liberal Democracy - Washington Center for Equitable Growth
We distinguish between… property rights, political rights, and civil rights… …Liberal democracy is that it protects civil rights (equality before the law for minorities) in addition to the other two. Democratic transitions are typically the product of a settlement between the elite (who care mostly about property rights) and the majority (who care mostly about political rights). Such settlements rarely produce liberal democracy, as the minority has neither the resources nor the numbers to make a contribution at the bargaining table. We develop a formal model to sharpen the contrast between electoral and liberal democracies…. We discuss… the difference between social mobilizations sparked by industrialization and decolonization. Since the latter revolve around identity cleavages rather than class cleavages, they are less conducive to liberal politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  liberal_democracy  civil_liberties  rights-legal  rights-political  human_rights  democratization  transition_economies  elites-political_influence  property_rights  property-confiscations  identity_politics  decolonization  post-colonial  industrialization  LDCs  emerging_markets  development  economic_growth  political_economy  political_culture  majoritarian  minorities  class_conflict  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Julián Casanova - The death throes of Franco: Spain's new reckoning with the dictatorship and Civil War | Eurozine - July 2011
Original in Spanish - Translation by Martin Douch ' First published in Eurozine -- Spain's Amnesty Act of 1977 ensured that, during the first two decades of democracy, the memory of the Civil War and the human rights violations of the Franco dictatorship remained taboo. Initiatives by the Zapatero government to redress historic injustices signal a new era, yet there is a way to go before Spanish society is unanimous about its past, writes historian Julián Casanova. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_culture  political_history  religious_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  WWII  post-WWII  Spain  Spanish_Civil_War  civil_wars  religious_wars  religious_culture  anti-Communist  authoritarian  democracy  human_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  collective_memory  memory-cultural  historiography  historiography-religious  historians-and-politics  historians-and-state  lieux_de_mémoires  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Leo E. Strine , Nicholas Walter Originalist or Original: The Difficulties of Reconciling "Citizens United" with Corporate Law History :: SSRN - Notre Dame Law Review, 2015, Forthcoming (rev'd March 2015)
Leo E. Strine Jr., Supreme Court of Delaware; Harvard Law School; Penn Law School -- Nicholas Walter, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz -- Citizens United has been the subject of a great deal of commentary, but one important aspect of the decision that has not been explored in detail is the historical basis for Justice Scalia’s claims in his concurring opinion that the majority holding is consistent with originalism. In this article, we engage in a deep inquiry into the historical understanding of the rights of the business corporation as of 1791 and 1868 — two periods relevant to an originalist analysis of the First Amendment. Based on the historical record, Citizens United is far more original than originalist, and if the decision is to be justified, it has to be on jurisprudential grounds originalists traditionally disclaim as illegitimate. -- PDF File: 94 -- Keywords: Jurisprudence, constitutional interpretation, original intent, original understanding, originalism, election law, campaign finance reform, corporate personhood, general corporation statutes, political speech, First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti, Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  US_constitution  constitutional_law  originalism  free_speech  civil_liberties  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  elections  campaign_finance  politics-and-money  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Lyman Johnson, David Millon - Corporate Law after Hobby Lobby :: SSRN (rev'd Jan 2015) THE BUSINESS LAWYER, Vol 70 - November 2014
Lyman Johnson, Washington and Lee University - School of Law; University of St. Thomas, St. Paul/Minneapolis, MN - School of Law -- David Millon
Washington and Lee University - School of Law -- We evaluate the U.S. Supreme Court's controversial decision in the Hobby Lobby case from the perspective of state corporate law. We argue that the Court is correct in holding that corporate law does not mandate that business corporations limit themselves to pursuit of profit. Rather, state law allows incorporation 'for any lawful purpose.' We elaborate on this important point and also explain what it means for a corporation to 'exercise religion.' In addition, we address the larger implications of the Court's analysis for an accurate understanding both of state law's essentially agnostic stance on the question of corporate purpose and also of the broad scope of managerial discretion. -- PDF File: 33 -- Keywords: Corporate purpose, Corporate personhood, Shareholder wealth maximization, Shareholder primacy, Corporate social responsibility -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  shareholders  freedom_of_conscience  SCOTUS  civil_liberties  corporate_control  corporate_personhood  limited_liability  corporations-closely-held  corporations  CSR  shareholder_value  shareholder_voting  profit_maximization  law-and-economics  labor_law  employee_benefits  power-asymmetric  capital_as_power  constitutional_law  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jay Tolson, Return of the Repressed - review of Michael Walzer, The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Yale University Press, 2015 -- The paradox explored in this short book, which grew out of the Henry L. Stimson lectures at Yale University, can be summed up in a single question: Why did so many states that gained independence in the post–World War II era and were founded on secular and democratic ideals soon face the powerful challenges of religious revivalism? Walzer’s inquiry into the inability of “the leaders and militants of secular liberation…to consolidate their achievements and reproduce themselves” focuses on three cases: Israel, where the secularist ideology of Labor Zionism now meets with powerful opposition from champions of a more messianic strain of Zionism as well as ultra-Orthodox Judaism; Algeria, where the secularist (and, briefly, democratic) ideals of the National Liberation Front have been repeatedly challenged and were nearly overturned by militant Islamists; and India, where the ambitious reform program of Jawaharlal Nehru’s Congress party has come up against the fervor and electoral successes of Hindu nationalists determined to assert their primacy within the constitutional order. -- behind paywall
books  kindle-available  reviews  paywall  political_history  20thC  post-colonial  nationalism  national_ID  national_origins  national_tale  politics-and-religion  secularism  secularization  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  modernity  modernization_theory  images-political  Israel  Islamist_fundamentalists  Judaism  Algeria  India  Indian_religion  Hinduism  right-wing  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  majoritarian  constitutionalism  post-WWII  religion-fundamentalism  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  populism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Colby and Peter J. Smith - The Return of Lochner :: SSRN - April 2015 - Cornell Law Review, Vol. 100, No. 527, 2015
Both at GW Law School - For a very long time, it has been an article of faith among liberals and conservatives alike that Lochner v. New York was obviously and irredeemably wrong. Lochner is one of only a few cases that constitute our “anticanon,” universally reviled by the legal community as the “worst of the worst.” (..) conservatives are ready, once again, to embrace Lochner — although perhaps not in name — by recommitting to some form of robust judicial protection for economic rights. (...) this impending change has been greatly facilitated by important modifications to the theory of originalism, which has served for nearly a half century as the intellectual framework for conservative legal thought (..) and it has now evolved to the point where it can plausibly accommodate claims that the Constitution protects economic liberty. (..) how legal movements evolve generally. Sometimes the courts change the doctrine, and the theorists scramble to keep up. This is, roughly speaking, what happened with liberal legal thought in the second half of the 20thC. Just when liberal legal theorists, reeling from the Lochner era, had settled on the view that the courts should exercise judicial review very sparingly — and perhaps never to enforce rights not specifically identified in the Constitution — the liberal Court began to exercise judicial review more frequently and aggressively, often to protect rights not clearly identified in the Constitution. Liberal theorists then struggled for years to develop an account of the appropriate judicial role that condemned Lochner but legitimized later cases protecting fundamental rights and vulnerable minorities. Modern conservative legal thought seems to be following the opposite progression: the theorists lead, the opinion leaders gradually sign on, and judges eventually follow. — conservatives have patiently waited for the theory to come together — for the blueprints to be drawn — before moving forward. But the plans are now largely ready, and we expect that it will not be long before the bulldozers break ground. - 77 pages saved to SSRN briefcase
article  SSRN  SCOTUS  libertarianism  US_constitution  US_legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  constitutional_law  civil_liberties  liberty-negative  laisser-faire  freedom_of_contract  freedom_of_conscience  equality  judicial_review 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Chait - Gay Marriage and the Modern Social Revolution -- NYMag - June 2015
The Supreme Court’s decision affirming marriage equality hastens what was already a fait accompli — public opinion has embraced the equal right to marriage at…
Instapaper  US_politics  US_society  US_legal_system  US_constitution  SCOTUS  change-social  equality  civil_liberties  homosexuality  marriage  LGBT  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Was Origen the Caitlyn Jenner of the Transabled? | The American Conservative - June 2015
I’m afraid I’m going to re-enter the fray. Rod Dreher has a piece today wondering whether the next step in our cultural development (or decline) will be the… Another superb piece by Millman illustrating how Dreher's hostility to changing cultural norms gets wrapped in a blanket condemnation of "modernity" (and liberalism, individualism, autonomy, and generally Enlightenment values) yet Dreher is committed to Enlightenment benefits of increased knowledge, and insists on liberalism's commitment to personal religious liberty. So it basically comes down to liberty for me but not for thee, with the Church authority for norm-setting both impervious to scientific and cultural change, and claiming an extension over those who don't recognize the Chyrch's authority. The example of Origen, whose spiritual commitment led to self-castration, and who wasn't condemned by the senior hierarchy (prior to the Church legislating on a range of norms dealing with the body and especially sexuality and gender, which was one reason Origen was never made a saint). Millman also has a lengthy passage from Tolstoy about a priest, sexual tension, spiritual demands and self-mutilation, with Tolstoy's final conclusion that this sort of psychological turmoil wasn’t the praiseworthy attitudes and action of a saint but self-absorbed cintra Christ's teaching. Tl; dr -- Dreher can't have it both ways (or in his case what seems like an ever-growing laundry list of contradictory ways). -- saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  sexuality  gender  gender-and-religion  norms  Early_Christian  theology  declinism  modernity  liberalism  Orthodox_Christianity  authority  individualism  autonomy  culture_wars  culture-American  cultural_change  cultural_authority  psychology  identity  biology  physiology  neuroscience  Tolstoy  religious_experience  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_liberties  bill_of_rights  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - An Anthropological Approach to Gay Marriage | The American Conservative - April 2015
This is an absolutely superb post, pointing out the universal logic across cultures to establish default rules for managing the key elements of family law shared across nuclear and extended families which the society has an interest in ensuring are dealt with in a regular rather than ad hoc fashion -- reproduction of the society through the production of children and their upbringing and material survival, and property relations, especially inheritance. He uses the Old Testament, and the shifts in rules as the culture developed (marrying the widow of one’s brother to ensure that the brother had an inheritance line within the family, which "law" has obviously been relaxed or abandoned as the clan or extended family ceased to be the organizing structure for families and property), as well as common practices (implicit rules) when the standard pattern of relations wasn't working (the patriarchs using concubines to produce heirs when their wives were barren). He also gives the example in Kenya of an unmarried older woman with no children who marries a younger woman, serves as the 'husband" in the marriage, and the younger woman uses men to get pregnant and "bear the children of the all-female family" who will inherit the "husband's" property. The contemporary state in the US has an interest in providing default rules for marriage, family formation and child care, and property relations including inheritance -- and since WE HAVE same-sex marriages that present exactly the same legal issues, the state has an interest in extending its default rules to those arrangements.
politics-and-religion  family  property  inheritance  marriage  US_legal_system  SCOTUS  Old_Testament  religion-fundamentalism  Biblical_authority  religious_culture  culture_wars  homosexuality  civil_liberties  gender_history  gender-and-religion  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Anthony Favier - Catholics and gender - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French version 2014)
Translated by Kate McNaughton -- Tags : catholicism | gender | homosexuality | marriage | education | feminism -- The criticism of “gender theory” that is expressed in some Catholic circles is not just a travesty of gender studies: it detracts from the development of a feminist theology and current efforts at establishing a dialogue within the Catholic Church -- tracks the history of hysterical anti-feminism and anti gender studies wrapped up with counter-revolution post Vatican II -- studying "gender" as a social and cultural phenomenon became the boogeyman for Catholic focus on the threats of liberal modernity to "Catholic anthropology" -- the hot button issues of reproductive rights, women in positions in the Church, and acknowledgement of homosexuality and gay marriage. After decades of overt hostile opposition, the French Church is sending out a new generation of Jesuit scholars to start distinguishing between the realities of cultural bases of gender vs the "extreme ideology" that has been labeled "gender theory." A 2014 statement on family by French bishops acknowledges much of "gender studies" as common sense, FREX how inequalities of power are implicated in many gender-defined social roles -- which they distinguish from rabid gender ideology. -- saved to Instapaper
20thC  21stC  Catholics  France  feminism  homosexuality  gender  Papacy  Vatican_II  ecclesiology  politics-and-religion  family  civil_liberties  equality  Jesuits  culture_wars  cultural_change  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Jennifer Pitts, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Perspectives on Politics, March 2013 on Isaac Nakhimovsky - Academia.edu
This book presents an important new account of Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Closed Commercial State, a major early nineteenth-century development of Rousseau and Kant's political thought. Isaac Nakhimovsky shows how Fichte reformulated Rousseau's constitutional politics and radicalized the economic implications of Kant's social contract theory with his defense of the right to work. Nakhimovsky argues that Fichte's sequel to Rousseau and Kant's writings on perpetual peace represents a pivotal moment in the intellectual history of the pacification of the West. Fichte claimed that Europe could not transform itself into a peaceful federation of constitutional republics unless economic life could be disentangled from the competitive dynamics of relations between states, and he asserted that this disentanglement required transitioning to a planned and largely self-sufficient national economy, made possible by a radical monetary policy. Fichte's ideas have resurfaced with nearly every crisis of globalization from the Napoleonic wars to the present, and his book remains a uniquely systematic and complete discussion of what John Maynard Keynes later termed "national self-sufficiency." Fichte's provocative contribution to the social contract tradition reminds us, Nakhimovsky concludes, that the combination of a liberal theory of the state with an open economy and international system is a much more contingent and precarious outcome than many recent theorists have tended to assume. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - Nov 2011
Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College -- Isaac Nakhimovsky has accomplished what I had thought to be impossible: he has made Fichte's The Closed Commercial State (1800) into an interesting text. By carefully situating this long-neglected work within its historical and philosophical context, Nakhimovsky enables us to see it as more than a misguided attempt by a major philosopher to address the political issues of his day by inventing a utopian vision of the free republic so obviously fantastic that it was widely dismissed as such by most of Fichte's own contemporaries. To his credit, Nakhimovsky does not deny the silliness of many of the details of that vision. What he shows, however, is the urgency -- and, more importantly, the continuing relevance -- of the central problem that Fichte's text attempts to solve: how to reconcile a Rousseauean ideal of free citizenship with the realities of modern "commercial" societies (marked, in Fichte's time, by a decline in agriculture in favor of industry and a rapidly increasing division of labor). Since the principal conflict here is the threat posed by international trade relations to the freedom and economic well-being of the citizens of republics enmeshed in those relations, it is not difficult (with Nakhimovsky's assistance) to see this seemingly most untimely of texts as addressing what is merely an earlier version of the same conflict that stands, even today, at the center of Europe's woes. One of the great strengths of Nakhimovsky's book is that it treats The Closed Commercial State as standing in a long line of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century texts that debate the implications for international peace of what we would call "globalized" commerce. (Kant's Perpetual Peace [1795] is the best known of these texts, it merely continues a much longer tradition that includes works by Fenélon, l'Abbé de Saint-Pierre, Rousseau, Sieyès, and many others.) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
R.I. Moore - The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Authority and Deviance in Western Europe 950-1250, 2nd ed (2007) | Wiley Online Library
The 10th to 13thCs in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a a classic in medieval history, Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, "A Persecuting Society". Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the "persecuting society" accordingly, addressing criticisms of the 1st ed. -- free access to pdfs of new preface, a final bibliographical essay & the bibliography & index -- downloaded all pdfs but index to Air
books  bibliography  medieval_history  religious_history  political_history  social_history  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  persecution  heterodoxy  heresy  Judaism  Inquisition  Papacy  religious_culture  civil_liberties  authority  deviance  norms  hierarchy  Crusades  power  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Mike Konczal, review essay - Selling Fast: Public Goods, Profits, and State Legitimacy | Boston Review - November 10, 2014
Nicholas R. Parrillo, Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780–1940, Yale University Press, $55 (paper) -- Dana Goldstein, The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, Doubleday, $26.95 (cloth) -- Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, PublicAffairs, $17.99 (paper) -- Adam Smith was not the first, but he was certainly one of the most eloquent defenders of justice delivered according to the profit motive (..)since courts could charge fees for conducting a trial, each court would endeavor, “by superior dispatch and impartiality, to draw to itself as many causes as it could.” Competition meant a judge would try “to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.” Left unsaid is what this system does to those who can’t afford to pay up. Our government is being remade in this mold—the mold of a business. The past thirty years have seen massive, outright privatization of government services. Meanwhile the logic of business, competition, and the profit motive has been introduced into what remains. But for those with a long enough historical memory, this is nothing new. Through the first half of our country’s history, public officials were paid according to the profit motive, and it was only through the failures of that system that a fragile accountability was put into place during the Progressive Era. One of the key sources of this accountability was the establishment of salaries for public officials who previously had been paid on commission.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_government  US_society  governance  legitimacy  accountability  inequality  justice  privatization  US_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  competition  profit  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  civil_society  civil_liberties  US_constitution  Evernote  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Urbinati, Nadia - The context of religious pluralism « The Immanent Frame - 26 Jan. 2012
Akeel Bilgrami’s article, “Secularism: Its Content and Context,” is an important and welcome contribution .... Bilgrami clarifies in a penetrating and lucid way, three fundamental ideas on secularism: first, that it is “a stance to be taken about religion”; second, that it is not an indication of the form of government or the liberal nature of a regime; and third, that the context is a crucial factor in issues concerning the relationship between politics and religion. The first two arguments are intertwined and pertain to the identity and function of secularism, while the latter brings us directly to the role of religion in the public sphere (...) in what follows [I] is propose some specifications and exemplifications that may enrich or complete [Bigrami's analysis]. -- In matters that have a direct impact on the individual freedom of religion and social peace such as the presence of religion in the public sphere, political theorists should pay close attention to the ethical context and the historical tradition of a given society without deducing practical conclusions from an ideal conception of democracy and liberalism. This pragmatic suggestion of going back and forth from the ideal norm to the context is an admission of the fact that a political practice that is liberal in a pluralistic religious environment may turn to be anti-liberal in a mono-religious society. Pluralism is the essential condition within which we should situate the discourse of the role of religions in the public sphere and the issue of secularism. Without pluralism (as a social fact or as an actual plurality of religions, not only a formal declaration of rights) a constitutional democracy has a weaker liberal nature and may generate decisions that are not more liberal or tolerant than those made in a non-constitutional democracy (or in a decent illiberal society, to paraphrase Rawls). -- example of "liberal public square" in a mono-religious society Catholic Thomist positions advocated in Italian artificial insemination debates producing very restrictive legislation of majority religion restricting rights of minority
21stC  political_philosophy  democracy  liberalism  secularism  public_sphere  Rawls  Habermas  sovereignty  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  civil_liberties  minorities  majoritarian  Italy  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  Thomism-21stC  reproductive_rights  women-rights  democratic_theory  democratization  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - More Social Movements or Fewer? Beyond Political Opportunity Structures to Relational Fields | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4, (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 333-365
Theory and Society - Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change -- If social movements are an attempt by "outsiders" to gain leverage within politics, then one might expect the global spread of democracy to reduce social movement activity. This article argues the reverse. Granted, many past social movements, such as women's rights and civil rights, were efforts to empower the disenfranchised. However, this is not typical. Rather, social movements and protest tactics are more often part of a portfolio of efforts by politically active leaders and groups to influence politics. Indeed, as representative governance spreads, with the conviction by all parties that governments should respond to popular choice, then social movements and protest will also spread, as a normal element of democratic politics. Social movements should therefore not be seen as simply a matter of repressed forces fighting states; instead they need to be situated in a dynamic relational field in which the ongoing actions and interests of state actors, allied and counter-movement groups, and the public at large all influence social movement emergence, activity, and outcomes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  power  power-asymmetric  democracy  political_participation  government-forms  governing_class  elites  grassroots  representative_institutions  reform-political  reform-social  reform-economic  franchise  accountability  interest_groups  voice  civil_liberties  women-rights  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Sallah, Robert O’Harrow Jr., Steven Rich - 3-part WaPo Investigation: "Stop and Seize on America's highways" | The Washington Post September 2014
Part 1: In recent years, thousands of people have had cash confiscated by police without being charged with crimes. -- Part 2: One training firm started a private intelligence-sharing network and helped shape law enforcement nationwide. -- Part 3: Motorists caught up in the seizures talk about the experience and the legal battles that sometimes took more than a year. **--** After the terror attacks on 9/11, the government called on police to become the eyes and ears of homeland security on America’s highways. Local officers, county deputies and state troopers were encouraged to act more aggressively in searching for suspicious people, drugs and other contraband. Dept Homeland Security and DOJ spent millions on police training. The effort succeeded, but it had an impact that has been largely hidden from public view: the spread of an aggressive brand of policing that has spurred the seizure of $100s millions in cash from motorists and others not charged with crimes. Thousands of people have been forced to fight legal battles to get their money back. Behind the rise in seizures is a cottage industry of private police-training firms that teach the techniques of “highway interdiction” to departments across the country. One firm created a private intelligence network that enabled police nationwide to share detailed reports about motorists — criminals and the innocent alike — including their Social Security numbers, addresses and identifying tattoos, as well as hunches about which drivers to stop. Many of the reports have been funneled to federal agencies and fusion centers as part of the government’s burgeoning law enforcement intelligence systems — despite warnings from state and federal authorities that the information could violate privacy and constitutional protections. A thriving subculture of road officers on the network now competes to see who can seize the most cash and contraband, describing their exploits in the network’s chat rooms and sharing “trophy shots” of money and drugs. Some police advocate highway interdiction as a way of raising revenue for cash-strapped municipalities.
US_society  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  US_politics-race  national_security  judiciary  local_government  state_government  government_finance  police  privacy  networks-information  power-asymmetric  abuse_of_power  public-private_partnerships  crime  criminal_justice  civil_liberties  terrorism  due_process  property-confiscations  intelligence_agencies  militarization-society  incentives  civil_society  governmentality  government_officials  authoritarian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven D. Smith, review essay - Discourse in the Dusk: The Twilight of Religious Freedom? | JSTOR: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 122, No. 7 (May, 2009), pp. 1869-1907
Reviewed work(s): Religion and the Constitution — Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness by Kent Greenawalt -- Smith claims a millennium of tradition re church and state is unraveling (a la MacIntyre decadent tradition) and US policy and jurisprudence tends to ignore erosion of their fundamental justifications -- starts with Pope Gregory and Henry IV and investiture controversy -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  church_history  civil_liberties  freedom_of_conscience  tolerance  pluralism  secularism  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  legal_theory  philosophy_of_law  medieval_history  Papacy  Reformation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Human Rights: A Critique of the Raz/Rawls Approach (2013) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-32 -- This paper examines and criticizes the suggestion that we should interpret the “human” in “human rights” as (i) referring to the appropriate sort of action when certain rights are violated rather than (ii) the (human) universality of certain rights. It considers first a crude version of (i) — the view that human rights are rights in response to whose violation we are prepared to countenance humanitarian intervention; then it considers more cautious and sophisticated versions of (i). It is argued that all versions of (i) distract us with side issues in our thinking about human rights, and sell short both the individualism of rights and the continuity that there is supposed to be between human rights and rights in national law. The paper does not deny that there are difficulties with views of type (ii). But it denies that the positing of views of type (i) gives us reason to abandon the enterprise of trying to sort these difficulties out. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 22 -- Keywords: Charles Beitz, John Rawls, Joseph Raz, human rights, humanitarian intervention, rights, sovereignty, universalism
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  international_system  international_law  human_rights  humanitarian  interventionism  sovereignty  universalism  civil_liberties  nation-state  Rawls  Raz 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Does ‘Equal Moral Status’ Add Anything to Right Reason? (2011) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-52 -- This paper explores the possibility that the principle of basic equality might be explicated by reference to the idea that humans constitute a "single-status" community. It explores some difficulties with the idea of status in its original legal habitat. These difficulties include skepticism about status fostered by John Austin and others. The paper attempts to answer this skepticism, and it concludes (along with Jeremy Bentham, who in this respect disagreed with his disciple) that once one takes a dynamic view of a legal system, the idea of legal status is not an eliminable idea. The paper then examines the distinction between what I call "sortal-status" and "condition-status." Sortal status works from the idea that law recognizes different kinds of human being: racist and sexist legal systems are characterized by sortal-status concepts. Condition-status recognizes that persons may get into various scrapes, situations, conditions, and vicissitudes, or pass through certain stages, that are marked by status distinctions. (These include infancy, alienage, felony, bankruptcy, matriage, military service etc.) Once one makes this distinction, then the idea of a single (sortal) status society becomes a promising vehicle for expressing ideas about moral equality. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 19 -- Keywords: Austin, Bentham, equality, legal system, racial discrimination, sex discrimination, status
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  equality  status  discrimination  social_order  civil_society  civil_liberties  Bentham  Austin_John  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Foundations of Religious Liberty: Toleration or Respect? (2010) :: SSRN - Freedom of Conscience symposium, San Diego Law Review, Forthcoming
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 275 -- Should we think of what I will refer to generically as “the law of religious liberty” as grounded in the moral attitude of respect for religion or in the moral attitude of tolerance of religion? I start with a well-known treatment of the idea of “respect” by the moral philosopher Stephen Darwall. Re toleration, I shall draw on my own earlier discussion, though now emphasizing the features of toleration that set it apart from one kind of respect. In deciding whether “respect” or “toleration” can plausibly serve as the moral foundation for the law of religious liberty we will need to say something about the nature of religion. I shall propose a fairly precise analysis of what makes a belief and a concomitant set of practices “religious” (again drawing on earlier work). That will then bring us to the central question: should our laws reflect “respect” for religion” or only “toleration”? Martha Nussbaum has recently argued for “respect” as the moral foundation of religious liberty, though, as I will suggest, her account is ambiguous between the two senses of respect that emerge from Darwall’s work. In particular, I shall claim that in one “thin” sense of respect, it is compatible with nothing more than toleration of religion; and that in a “thicker” sense (which Nussbaum appears to want to invoke), it could not form the moral basis of a legal regime since religion is not the kind of belief system that could warrant that attitude. To make the latter case, I examine critically a recent attack on the idea of "respect" for religious belief by Simon Blackburn. -- Leiter changed his mind on some of this for his book on Toleration of Religion but discussion of Nussbaum et al looks useful -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  freedom_of_conscience  religious_belief  tolerance  respect  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  sociology_of_religion  Nussbaum  Darwall  Blackburn  epistemology-moral 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Danielle Keats Citron and Frank A. Pasquale - "The Scored Society: Due Process for Automated Predictions" | 89 Washington Law Review 1 (2014)
Both at University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law -- Keywords - Big Data, predictions, artificial intelligence -- Big Data is increasingly mined to rank and rate individuals. Predictive algorithms assess whether we are good credit risks, desirable employees, reliable tenants, valuable customers—or deadbeats, shirkers, menaces, and “wastes of time.” Crucial opportunities are on the line, including the ability to obtain loans, work, housing, and insurance. Though automated scoring is pervasive and consequential, it is also opaque and lacking oversight. In one area where regulation does prevail—credit—the law focuses on credit history, not the derivation of scores from data. Procedural regularity is essential for those stigmatized by “artificially intelligent” scoring systems. The American due process tradition should inform basic safeguards. Regulators should be able to test scoring systems to ensure their fairness and accuracy. Individuals should be granted meaningful opportunities to challenge adverse decisions based on scores miscategorizing them. Without such protections in place, systems could launder biased and arbitrary data into powerfully stigmatizing scores. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  legal_theory  US_constitution  civil_liberties  due_process  big_data  financial_innovation  privacy  reputation  inequality  financial_regulation  algorithms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Best of the OLL No. 43: “The Habeas Corpus Act” (1679) - Online Library of Liberty
The Best of the OLL No. 43: “The Habeas Corpus Act” (1679) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). -- This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list with links to HTML versions of the texts is available here. Parliament passed the Habeas Corpus Act in 1679 as part of a campaign against King Charles II led by the Earl of Shaftesbury who was attempting to exclude Charles II’s brother James from the succession to the throne of England because of his Catholic religious beliefs and the fear that he would rule in an arbitrary manner. The Act was designed to place limits on the arbitrary power of the monarch to imprison his political opponents by by-passing the courts. -- downloaded pdf to Note
etexts  primary_sources  legislation  17thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  judiciary  habeas_corpus  civil_liberties  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Parliament  Absolutism  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) - Online Library of Liberty
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). -- This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list with links to HTML versions of the texts is available here. The English Bill of Rights (1689) is part of a series of legal statements about the rights of Englishmen which were proclaimed during the 17th century. Others include the Petition of Right (1628), the Agreement of the People (1647, 1648), and the Habeas Corpus Act (1679). It was a clear statement of the primacy of Parliament in the British system of government and defined the legal limits of the power of the government over the citizens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_history  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  government-forms  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliament  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Adams, Revolutionary Writings, ed. C. Bradley Thompson - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Revolutionary Writings of John Adams, Selected and with a Foreword by C. Bradley Thompson (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/592> -- This volume contains the principal shorter writings in which Adams addresses the prospect of revolution and the form of government proper to the new United States. There are pieces on the nature of the British Constitution and the meaning of rights, sovereignty, representation, and obligation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  Adams_John  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  US_constitution  American_colonies  US_politics  American_Revolution  citizenship  natural_rights  civil_liberties  sovereignty  representation  representative_institutions  obligation  authority  legitimacy  Early_Republic  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law [c 1750, tran 1763], trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. Peter Korkman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law, trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. and with an Introduction by Peter Korkman (Indianpolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1717> -- The basis of this version of The Principles of Natural and Politic Law is Thomas Nugent’s 1763 English translation, which became a standard textbook at Cambridge and at many premier American colleges, including Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania. The first scholarly work on Burlamaqui was written by an American, M. Ray Forrest Harvey, who in 1937 argued that Burlamaqui was well known among America’s Founding Fathers and that his writings exerted considerable influence on the American constitutional system. In his introduction, Nugent said of Burlamaqui: “His singular beauty consists in the alliance he so carefully points out between ethics and jurisprudence, religion and politics, after the example of Plato and Tully, and the other illustrious masters of antiquity.”
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  intellectual_history  natural_law  political_philosophy  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  sovereignty  Geneva  Calvinist  natural_rights  mixed_government  aristocracy-natural  elites  bourgeoisie  democracy  authority  legitimacy  civil_liberties  civil_religion  happiness  rationalist  Grotius  Pufendorf  Barbeyrac  Leibniz  Rousseau  governing_class  government-forms  governance  state-building  state-of-nature  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  English_constitution  legal_history  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  ancient_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  commonwealth  legislation  judiciary  civil_liberties  property  property_rights  James_I  Charles_I  taxes  prerogative  Magna_Carta  lawyers  equity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Pollock and Maitland - The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I, 2 vols. [1898] (rprnt 2010 of 2nd ed CUP 1968, notes & bibliography S.F. Milson) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Frederick Pollock, The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I. Reprint of 2nd edition, with a Select Bibliography and Notes by Professor S.F. Milsom. (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 2 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2312> -- First published in 1895, Sir Frederick Pollock and Frederic William Maitland’s legal classic The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I expanded the work of Sir Edward Coke and William Blackstone by exploring the origins of key aspects of English common law and society and with them the development of individual rights as these were gradually carved out from the authority of the Crown and the Church. Although it has been more than a century since its initial publication, Pollock and Maitland’s work is still considered an accessible and useful foundational reference for scholars of medieval English law
books  etexts  Medieval  British_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  common_law  feudalism  ancient_constitution  canon_law  local_government  monarchy  civil_liberties  property_rights  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law [1948], ed. Stephen Presser - Online Library of Liberty
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law, ed. Stephen Presser (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/671> Roscoe Pound, former dean of Harvard Law School, delivered a series of lectures at the University of Calcutta in 1948. In these lectures, he criticized virtually every modern mode of interpreting the law because he believed the administration of justice had lost its grounding and recourse to enduring ideals. Now published in the U.S. for the first time, Pound’s lectures are collected in Liberty Fund’s The Ideal Element in Law, Pound’s most important contribution to the relationship between law and liberty. The Ideal Element in Law was a radical book for its time and is just as meaningful today as when Pound’s lectures were first delivered. Pound’s view of the welfare state as a means of expanding government power over the individual speaks to the front-page issues of the new millennium as clearly as it did to America in the mid-twentieth century. Pound argues that the theme of justice grounded in enduring ideals is critical for America. He views American courts as relying on sociological theories, political ends, or other objectives, and in so doing, divorcing the practice of law from the rule of law and the rule of law from the enduring ideal of law itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  legal_theory  legal_system  legal_culture  legal_realism  US_legal_system  judiciary  sociology  social_history  social_sciences  liberty  liberalism  welfare_state  historicism  civil_liberties  civil_society  modernity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R. Westphal - Enlightenment Fundamentals: Rights, Responsibilities & Republicanism | Diametros
Kenneth R. Westphal is Professorial Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University of East Anglia (Norwich), and currently Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg. -- This essay re-examines some key fundamentals of the Enlightenment regarding individual rights, responsibilities and republicanism which deserve and require re-emphasis today, insofar as they underscore the character and fundamental importance of mature judgment, and how developing and fostering mature judgment is a fundamental aim of education. These fundamentals have been clouded or eroded by various recent developments, including mis-guided educational policy and not a little scholarly bickering. Clarity about these fundamentals is more important today than ever. Sapere aude! -- Keywords - Hobbes Hume Rousseau Kant Hegel, rational justification, mature judgment, moral constructivism, realism objectivity rights responsibilities republicanism media culture, Euthyphro question, natural law, Dilemma of the Criterion -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  French_Enlightenment  Germany  German_Idealism  voluntarism  obligation  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civic_virtue  Hobbes  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  Kant  Kant-ethics  Hegel  judgment-political  public_sphere  media  political_culture  values  education-civic  education-higher  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  21stC  Dewey  Quine  Sellars  analytical_philosophy  academia  professionalization 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Nadeau, review essay - Blaise Bachofen (dir.), Le libéralisme au miroir du droit. L’État, la personne, la propriété - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 249-253 | Érudit 
Christian Nadeau - Université de Montréal -- Ces auteurs, pour la plupart spécialistes de philosophie politique moderne, se sont penchés sur des notions fondamentales du libéralisme en les situant dans leur contexte théorique d’émergence. Sont ainsi passés au crible de l’analyse philosophique les oeuvres de Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Bentham, Constant et Tocqueville, mais aussi, celles des auteurs associés au conservatisme, comme Burke ou Bonald. Dans son introduction, Blaise Bachofen explique les raisons pour lesquelles les textes rassemblés dans ce recueil se recoupent sur la notion de libéralisme normatif, et plus précisément de libéralisme juridique. La norme de droit propre au libéralisme permet en effet de rendre compte à la fois de sa dimension politique et de sa dimension économique. L’égal traitement de droit contient en lui-même les motivations morales des principes fondamentaux du libéralisme. -- Trois grandes notions ont été retenues pour expliciter le paradigme du libéralisme juridique : L’État, comme lieu des échanges et des protections individuelles ; la personne, comme sujet du droit et de la liberté ; la propriété, comme notion canonique du rapport de l’individu à lui-même et aux objets qu’il peut légitimement faire siens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  Montesquieu  Bentham  Burke  Constant  Tocqueville  liberalism  property  property_rights  equality  civil_liberties  nation-state  utilitarianism  legal_system  counter-revolution  social_contract  legitimacy  public_opinion  political_culture  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stéphane Courtois, review essay - Jürgen Habermas, Entre naturalisme et religion. Les défis de la démocratie - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 265-269 | Érudit 
English translation - Between Naturalism and Religion, Polity Press (2008) -- Stéphane Courtois - Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières --- Naturalisme et religion est la traduction française de Zwischen Naturalismus und Religion. Philosophische Aufsätze, paru chez Suhrkamp en 2005. Il s’agit d’un recueil d’essais rédigés par Habermas à diverses occasions et qui ne forment pas un tout systématique, bien qu’ils soient animés par une intention commune dont je discuterai plus loin. Qu’il me soit permis, avant de discuter plus avant de la teneur de l’ouvrage, de faire quelques brèves remarques sur l’édition française. Comme c’est souvent leur habitude, les éditeurs français se sont permis quelques libertés par rapport à l’ouvrage d’origine -- chose que l’on n’observe pas, par exemple, du côté anglophone où Between Naturalism and Religion, paru chez Polity Press en 2008, respecte scrupuleusement l’édition originale. Des onze essais qui la composent, les éditeurs français ont choisi de n’en conserver que sept, auxquels ils ont joint un court essai de Habermas, « Une conscience de ce qui manque », originellement paru dans un ouvrage du même titre
books  reviews  Habermas  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  culture_wars  secularism  civil_liberties  civil_society  moral_philosophy  public_sphere  Kant  Enlightenment_Project  Adorno  scientism  multiculturalism 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  secularization  religious_culture  Church_of_England  church_history  ecclesiology  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  tolerance  natural_religion  natural_law  Pufendorf  dissenters  Locke  heterodoxy  Leibniz  Barbeyrac  Hutcheson  British_history  Germany  Scottish_Enlightenment  religion-established  religious_wars  Protestants  Huguenots  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_religion  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Coffey - Puritanism and Liberty Revisited: The Case for Toleration in the English Revolution - JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 961-985
In recent years historians have grown sceptical about attempts to trace connections between puritanism and liberty. Puritans, we are told, sought a godly society, not a pluralistic one. The new emphasis has been salutary, but it obscures the fact that a minority of zealous Protestants argued forcefully for the toleration of heresy, blasphemy, Catholicism, non-Christian religions, and even atheism. During the English revolution, a substantial number of Baptists, radical Independents, and Levellers insisted that the New Testament paradigm required the church to be a purely voluntary, non-coercive community in the midst of a pluralistic society governed by a `merely civil' state. Although their position was not without its ambiguities, it constituted a startling break with the Constantinian assumptions of magisterial Protestantism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  religious_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  Levellers  tolerance  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  church_history  New_Testament  apostolic_succession  Early_Christian  theocracy  heterodoxy  pluralism  civil_liberties  civil_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
L. J. Reeve - The Legal Status of the Petition of Right | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 257-277
Useful for bibliography and overview of century of revisionism and counter revisionism since Gardiner. See Kishlansky for further counter-counter revisionism on Petition of Right that places more blame on the radical enemies of Buckingham including Selden-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  historiography  revisionism  British_politics  legal_history  judiciary  legislation  Petition_of_Right  petitions  Charles_I  Parliament  prerogative  civil_liberties  public_finance  taxes  common_law  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John A. Shedd - Legalism over Revolution: The Parliamentary Committee for Indemnity and Property Confiscation Disputes, 1647-1655 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1093-1107
Royalists of the Civil War period readily employed the English legal system to recover lost estates, even at the nadir of their political fortunes, namely the years just after the king's defeat. Rather than accept the verdict of a war lost, royalist and Catholic `delinquents' successfully sought their own verdicts at law against former tenants for rents on lands that had been confiscated by parliament. The radical MPs staffing the Indemnity Committee respected the principles of due process of law and, ironically, given the fact that the committee's purpose was to protect parliament's supporters, upheld royalist claims to confiscated lands, thereby assisting the law courts in thwarting parliament's plan to repay war debts with rents collected from losers' property. So pervasive was the legalistic mindset in both the courts and the Indemnity Committee that royalists received favourable rulings against many on the winning side of the conflict, including famous leaders such as Sir William Brereton. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  property_rights  landowners  Royalists  Catholics-England  Parliamentarians  property-confiscations  legal_culture  economic_culture  political_culture  sovereign_debt  due_process  civil_liberties  judiciary  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Corey Robin - The Republican War on Workers' Rights - NYTimes.com - May 2014
In 2010, the Republicans won control of the executive and legislative branches in 11 states (there are now more than 20 such states). Inspired by business groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers, they proceeded to rewrite the rules of work, passing legislation designed to enhance the position of employers at the expense of employees. The University of Oregon political scientist Gordon Lafer, who wrote an eye-opening report on this topic last October for the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank in Washington, looked at dozens of bills affecting workers. The legislation involved unemployment insurance, the minimum wage, child labor, collective bargaining, sick days, even meal breaks. Despite frequent Republican claims to be defending local customs and individual liberty, Mr. Lafer found a “cookie-cutter” pattern to their legislation. Not only did it consistently favor employers over workers, it also tilted toward big government over local government. And it often abridged the economic rights of individuals.
US_politics  political_economy  GOP  state_government  business  business-and-politics  labor  wages  civil_liberties  inequality  power 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Your Evening Jemmy (against legislative encroachment on freedom of speech) - Esquire
Hence, in the United States the great and essential rights of the people are secured against legislative as well as against executive ambition. They are secured, not by laws paramount to prerogative, but by constitutions paramount to laws. This security of the freedom of the press requires that it should be exempt not only from previous restraint by the Executive, as in Great Britain, but from legislative restraint also; and this exemption, to be effectual, must be an exemption not only from the previous inspection of licensers, but from the subsequent penalty of laws. -- James Madison, Report On The Virginia Resolutions, 1800
English_constitution  US_constitution  civil_liberties  political_press  free_speech  prerogative  Madison  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Big Data and Discrimination | Demos - May 2014
On May 1, the White House released a 90 day review studying the effects of big data and privacy, led by Obama's Counsel, John Podesta. Big data truly has enormous potential for social change and creative innovation. However, a key finding of the review is that big data analytics has the potential to lead to discriminatory outcomes and to evade and stymie hard-won civil rights protections in housing, employment, credit, and the consumer market. Fundamentally, big data creates a power imbalance between those who hold and apply the data and between those who knowingly or unknowingly supply it. The review finds that perfect personalization, which is the fusion of many different kinds of data, processed in real time, can lead to overt and covert forms of discrimination in pricing, services, and opportunities.
US_government  Internet  tech  civil_liberties  inequality  Innovation  consumers 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Villa - Hegel, Tocqueville, and "Individualism" | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 659-686
Critics of liberal individualism have pointed out the many failures of "atomism" as a method in social and political philosophy. Their methodological criticisms have a tendency, however, to devolve into repudiations of moral individualism as such. In part, this is due to a misreading of Hegel and Tocqueville, two critics of individualism who nevertheless upheld the importance of individual rights and what Hegel called "freedom of subjectivity." My essay brings these two very different theorists together in order to show how each deliberately dispensed with the ontology inherited from eighteenth-century social contract theory, the better to focus on associational life and public freedom. The end result is not a relapse into the rhetoric of civic republicanism, but a refurbishment of that tradition from the standpoint of modern liberty: the liberty of the individual. This common project links Hegel, the idealist philosopher, and Tocqueville, the liberal-republican, in unexpected but complementary ways. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  liberalism  individualism  communitarian  community  liberty  18thC  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  civil_liberties  republicanism  neo-republicanism  civic_humanism  civil_society  social_contract  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Horacio Spector - Four Conceptions of Freedom | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 6 (December 2010), pp. 780-808
Contemporary political philosophers discuss the idea of freedom in terms of two distinctions: Berlin's famous distinction between negative and positive liberty, and Skinner and Pettit's divide between liberal and republican liberty. In this essay I proceed to recast the debate by showing that there are two strands in liberalism, Hobbesian and Lockean, and that the latter inherited its conception of civil liberty from republican thought. I also argue that the contemporary debate on freedom lacks a perspicuous account of the various conceptions of freedom, mainly because it leaves aside the classic contrast between natural liberty and civil liberty. Once we consider both the negative/positive distinction and the natural/civil one, we can classify all conceptions of freedom within four basic irreducible categories. In light of the resulting framework I show that there are two distinct conceptions of republican liberty, natural and civil, and that the former is coupled with an ideal of individual self-control. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  liberty  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  republicanism  neo-republicanism  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  domination  slavery  natural_rights  civil_liberties  Hobbes  Locke  Berlin_Isaiah  Skinner  Pettit  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dirk Matten and Andrew Crane - Corporate Citizenship: Toward an Extended Theoretical Conceptualization | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 166-179
We critically examine the content of contemporary understandings of corporate citizenship and locate them within the extant body of research dealing with business-society relations. Our main purpose is to realize a theoretically informed definition of corporate citizenship that is descriptively robust and conceptually distinct from existing concepts in the literature. Specifically, our extended perspective exposes the element of "citizenship" and conceptualizes corporate citizenship as the administration of a bundle of individual citizenship rights--social, civil, and political--conventionally granted and protected by governments. -- cited by more than 35 in jstor -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  liberalism  markets  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  legal_system  international_political_economy  globalization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Crane and Dirk Matten - Corporate Citizenship: Missing the Point or Missing the Boat? A Reply to van Oosterhout | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Oct., 2005), pp. 681-684
Short follow up to earlier article challenging mushy use of CC relative to CSR. This piece clarifies what they were tackling in the article and areas where the concept needs to be expanded to deal with what's happening. A decade later after Citizens United etc their distinction from CSR and expansion to deal with blurred boundaries between state, civil society, business, politics, citizen rights and responsibilities is even more appropriate. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Sabl - The Last Artificial Virtue: Hume on Toleration and Its Lessons | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 4 (August 2009), pp. 511-538
David Hume's position on religion is, broadly speaking, "politic": instrumental and consequentialist. Religions should be tolerated or not according to their effects on political peace and order. Such theories of toleration are often rejected as immoral or unstable. The reading provided here responds by reading Hume's position as one of radically indirect consequentialism. While religious policy should serve consequentialist ends, making direct reference to those ends merely gives free reign to religious-political bigotry and faction. Toleration, like Hume's other "artificial virtues" (justice, fidelity to promises, allegiance to government), is a universally useful response to our universal partiality—as Established uniformity, however tempting, is not. This implies that toleration can progress through political learning, becoming broader and more constitutionally established over time. A sophisticated Humean approach thus shares the stability and normative attractiveness of respect- or rights-based arguments while responding more acutely and flexibly to problems the former often slights: antinomian religious extremism; underdefined political agency; and internationalized, politicized religious movements. -- extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  religion-established  tolerance  civil_liberties  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  social_order  freedom_of_conscience  faction  bigotry  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Johan Tralau - Hobbes contra Liberty of Conscience | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 58-84
It has often been argued that, notwithstanding his commitment to the authoritarian state, Thomas Hobbes is a champion of the "minimal" version of liberty of conscience: namely, the freedom of citizens to think whatever they like as long as they obey the law. Such an interpretation renders Hobbes's philosophy more palatable to contemporary society. Yet the claim is incorrect. Alongside his notion of "private" conscience, namely, Hobbes develops a conception of conscience as a public phenomenon. In the following, it is argued that this inconsistency serves the purpose of deception: it holds out the possibility of dissent while making it impossible to utilise. Arguably, moreover, this is the proper hermeneutical approach to take to Hobbes's inconsistencies in general. Indeed, said inconsistencies ought to alert contemporary normative theorists to the instability of the "minimal" version of liberty of conscience attributed to Hobbes: Hobbes himself, namely, shows that it is insufficient. - paywall Sage - see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  liberty  Absolutism  tolerance  civil_liberties  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven B. Smith - What Is "Right" In Hegel's Philosophy of Right? | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 83, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 3-18
I provide a thematic reconstruction of Hegel's positive concept of right. Against those who charge that Hegel denies any role to substantive political evaluation, I argue that the Philosophy of Right articulates a notion of the right to recognition (Anerkennung) as the central feature of the modern state. The concept of recognition, I contend, requires not just toleration of others but a more robust notion of respect for the @'free personality@' that is the philosophical ground of right. The right to recognition is, furthermore, intended to provide the foundation for a new form of ethical life (Sittlichkeit), Hegel's modern analogue to classical conceptions of civic virtue. In conclusion I examine briefly two objections that stand in the way of a contemporary rehabilitation of Hegelian political Philosophy.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Hegel  natural_rights  tolerance  recognition  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Akhil Reed Amar - The Bill of Rights as a Constitution | JSTOR: The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 100, No. 5 (Mar., 1991), pp. 1131-1210
The original Bill of Rights is almost never studied as an integrated whole. This Article offers an overview of the Bill of Rights illustrating how virtually all of its provisions relate to each other and to those of the original Constitution. The overview yields an unconventional finding: the dominant theme of the original Bill was not to vest individuals and minorities with substantive rights against popular majorities. Like the original Constitution, the Bill certainly focused on issues of federalism, bicameralism, representation, constitutional amendment, and popular sovereignty. The main thrust of the unReconstructed-that is pre-Fourteenth Amendment-Bill of Rights was far more structural and majoritarian than we have come to believe. -- enormous bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  legal_history  18thC  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  civil_liberties  majoritarian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Boyd - Thomas Hobbes and the Perils of Pluralism | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 63, No. 2 (May, 2001), pp. 392-413
Scholarly opinion has been split uneasily between those who view Thomas Hobbes as a defender of Royalist absolutism and those who see him as the intellectual forefather of liberal individualism. While both these positions are compatible with Hobbes's deep-seated fear of intermediary associations between individual and state, this article will contend that it is his fear of the violent and irrational properties of groups that motivates his well-known individualism and gives a potentially illiberal bent to his political thought. Attending to Hobbes's neglected thoughts on the dangers posed by parties, sects, and other groups between individual and state sheds light on both the historical context and intellectual legacy of his thought. Hobbes's metaphorical complaints about those "lesser Common-wealths" akin to "wormes in the entrayles of a naturall man" also should prompt us to rethink many versions of contemporary pluralism and the vogue of civil society: Much of what today is recommended as "civil society" was considered anything but "civil" in the early modern political imagination.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  Absolutism  individualism  liberalism  fear  parties  faction  sectarianism  pluralism  civil_society  civil_liberties  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charlie Stross - Spy Kids | Foreign Policy August 2013
We human beings are primates. We have a deeply ingrained set of cultural and interpersonal behavioral rules that we violate only at social cost. One of these rules, essential for a tribal organism, is bilaterality: Loyalty is a two-way street. (Another is hierarchy: Yield to the boss.) Such rules are not iron-bound or immutable -- we're not robots -- but our new hive superorganism employers don't obey them instinctively, and apes and monkeys and hominids tend to revert to tit-for-tat strategies readily when they're unsure of their relative status. Perceived slights result in retaliation, and blundering, human-blind organizations can bruise an employee's ego without even noticing. And slighted or bruised employees who lack instinctive loyalty, because the culture they come from has spent generations systematically destroying social hierarchies and undermining their sense of belonging, are much more likely to start thinking the unthinkable.
US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  US_society  NSA  civil_liberties  neoliberalism  nationalism  Internet 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Evgeny Morozov on Why Our Privacy Problem is a Democracy Problem in Disguise | MIT Technology Review
When all citizens demand their rights but are unaware of their responsibilities, the political questions that have defined democratic life over centuries—How should we live together? What is in the public interest, and how do I balance my own interest with it?—are subsumed into legal, economic, or administrative domains. “The political” and “the public” no longer register as domains at all; laws, markets, and technologies displace debate and contestation as preferred, less messy solutions.

But a democracy without engaged citizens doesn’t sound much like a democracy—and might not survive as one. This was obvious to Thomas Jefferson, who, while wanting every citizen to be “a participator in the government of affairs,” also believed that civic participation involves a constant tension between public and private life. A society that believes, as Simitis put it, that the citizen’s access to information “ends where the bourgeois’ claim for privacy begins” won’t last as a well-functioning democracy.

Thus the balance between privacy and transparency is especially in need of adjustment in times of rapid technological change. That balance itself is a political issue par excellence, to be settled through public debate and always left open for negotiation. It can’t be settled once and for all by some combination of theories, markets, and technologies. As Simitis said: “Far from being considered a constitutive element of a democratic society, privacy appears as a tolerated contradiction, the implications of which must be continuously reconsidered.”
21stC  tech  Internet  civil_liberties  civic_virtue  democracy  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Tom Bingham reviews ‘Habeas Corpus’ by Paul Halliday · LRB 7 October 2010
Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire by Paul Halliday Harvard, 502 pp, £29.95, March 2010, ISBN 978 0 674 04901 7 -- The third striking feature is a sombre one: in times of perceived emergency, when the security of the people is trumpeted as the highest political imperative, personal freedom, and with it the remedy of habeas corpus, are the first casualties. But over the 300-year period studied by Halliday the writ earned the eulogistic epithets applied to it: he calculates that more than 11,000 detainees applied for relief, of whom more than half (53 per cent) were released.
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  legal_history  legal_system  Parliament  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  judiciary  separation-of-powers  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Abraham D. Kriegel: Liberty and Whiggery in Early Nineteenth-Century England (1980)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 1980), pp. 253-278 -- by end of 18thC Whigs had won the battle over defining that ambiguous event, the Glorious Revolution, and had claimed the uncontested mantle of champions of liberty. And in this sense Bolingbroke's claim of the Revolution belonging to both Whigs and Tories, regardless of what theory was used to jusify was indeed out Whigging the Whhigs. But "liberty" had some suspect origins (noble and corporate privileges) by early 19thC and very ambiguous applications, especially in connection with that other ambiguous term property. Some good stuff on particular 17thC and 18thC moments in evolution of political language.
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_politics  political_history  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  language-politics  Whigs  Grey_Lord  Fox_Charles_James  Reform_Act_1832  elections  suffrage  aristocracy  elites  landowners  landed_interest  liberty  property  commerce  middle_class  civil_liberties  constituencies  corruption  hierarchy  deference  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sharon Krause: The Spirit of Separate Powers in Montesquieu (2000)
JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Spring, 2000), pp. 231-265 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Montesquieu's theory of separate powers is elaborated in a discussion of the constitution of England in Book XI, chapter 6 of The Spirit of the Laws, which is by far the most discussed section of that work. Many commentators have interpreted the English system straightforwardly as Montesquieu's ideal regime. But while he greatly admires the legal separation of powers in the English constitution, he worries that the spirit of "extreme" liberty among the English could undercut the constitutional separation of powers that protects their liberty. Montesquieu's ambivalence thus raises questions as to what sort of "spirit" a regime must have to sustain a constitution of separate powers and so to preserve individual liberty. His reservations about England are important for understanding his philosophy of liberalism and have broad significance for any polity that seeks to protect individual liberty through a constitution of separate powers.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Montesquieu  constitutions  separation-of-powers  judiciary  Parlement  French_government  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  despotism  downloaded  EF-add  liberty  political_culture  civil_liberties  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David C. Snyder: Locke on Natural Law and Property Rights (1986)
JSTOR: Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 16, No. 4 (Dec., 1986), pp. 723-750 -- extends Tully's natural law analysis -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_law  property  property_rights  civil_liberties  social_contract  Locke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Lamb: Locke on Ownership, Imperfect Duties and ‘the Art of Governing’ (2010) - The British Journal of Politics & International Relations | Wiley Online Library
Lamb, R. (2010), Locke on Ownership, Imperfect Duties and ‘the Art of Governing’. The British Journal of Politics & International Relations, 12: 126–141. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-856X.2009.00397.x -- In this article, I discuss how Locke's account of virtuous moral obligation fits with his theory of individual rights, with specific attention to his account of ownership. I suggest that the best way to make sense of the relationship between the competing concepts of rights and virtue in Locke's thought is through the idea of imperfect duties: moral duties that do not necessarily have a legal equivalent. These duties indicate how a teleological account of morality can exist within the framework of a commitment to individual rights while also raising questions about how a Lockean government should act in regard to them. I identify the imperfect duties involved in the ownership of property and tentatively explore Locke's scattered recommendations for ‘the art of governing’ individuals.
article  Wiley  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  moral_philosophy  virtue  obligation  property  property_rights  civil_liberties  Locke  17thC  Britain  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1730s  1848_revolutions  abolition  Absolutism  abuse_of_power  academia  access_to_services  accountability  Adams_John  Adorno  African-Americans  Algeria  algorithms  amazon.com  American_colonies  American_Revolution  analytical_philosophy  ancient_constitution  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Ancien_régime  Anglo-American  Anglo-French  Anglo-Saxons  anthropology  anti-Communist  anti-Semitism  anticlerical  apostolic_succession  Arendt  aristocracy  aristocracy-natural  article  atheism_panic  Atlantic  Austin_John  Austria  authoritarian  authority  autonomy  a_priori  bad_history  Barbeyrac  Bentham  Berlin_Isaiah  Biblical_authority  bibliography  bigotry  big_data  bill_of_rights  biology  Blackburn  Black_churches  Black_literature  Black_scholars  Board_of_Trade  Bolingbroke  books  bourgeoisie  Britain  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  bureaucracy  Burke  business  business-and-politics  buy  Calvinist  campaign_finance  canon_law  capitalism  capital_as_power  Carolina  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  change-intellectual  change-social  Charles_I  Charles_II  checks-and-balances  Christendom  Christianity  Christology  Church-and-State  church_history  Church_of_England  cities  citizens  citizenship  city_states  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civility-political  civilizing_process  civil_code  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_religion  civil_service  civil_society  civil_wars  class_conflict  Coates  Coleridge  collective_memory  colonialism  commerce  commonwealth  Commonwealthmen  common_good  common_law  communitarian  community  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  comparative_law  competition  competition-interstate  concepts  Confucianism  Congress  Constant  constituencies  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  constitutions  consumers  contention  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control  corporate_governance  corporate_law  corporate_personhood  corporations  corporations-closely-held  corruption  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-revolution  crime  criminal_justice  Cromwell  cross-border  Crusades  CSR  cultural_authority  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_influence  culture-American  culture_wars  Darwall  declinism  decolonization  deference  democracy  democracy_deficit  democratic_theory  democratization  Democrats-Southern  despotism  development  deviance  Dewey  DHS  dignity  diplomacy-environment  diplomats  discrimination  dissenters  domination  downloaded  due_process  Durkheim  Dutch  Early_Christian  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  economic_culture  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_sociology  education  education-civic  education-continuing  education-higher  EF-add  egalitarian  elections  elites  elites-political_influence  elites-self-destructive  elite_culture  Elizabeth  emerging_markets  empire-and_business  empires  employee_benefits  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  enlightened_absolutism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  entre_deux_guerres  Epicurean  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-social  equality  equity  etexts  Europe-Early_Modern  Evangelical  Evernote  evidence  Exclusion_Crisis  executive  faction  family  fear  federalism  feminism  feudalism  Fichte  financial_innovation  financial_regulation  find  Foucault  Founders  Fox_Charles_James  France  franchise  francophile  freedom  freedom_of_conscience  freedom_of_contract  free_speech  free_trade  French_Enlightenment  French_government  French_intellectuals  French_language  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Freud  Gauchet  gender  gender-and-religion  gender_history  Geneva  geohistory  Germany  German_Idealism  Gilded_Age  globalization  global_governance  Glorious_Revolution  godly_persons  Godwin_Wm  good  GOP  governance  governing_class  government-forms  governmentality  government_agencies  government_finance  government_officials  grassroots  Grey_Lord  Grotius  guerrillas  GWOT  habeas_corpus  Habermas  Hanoverian_Succession  happiness  Hegel  heresy  heterodoxy  hierarchy  High_Church  Hinduism  historians-and-politics  historians-and-state  historical_change  historical_sociology  historicism  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-religious  historiography-Whig  Hobbes  Holy_Roman_Empire  homosexuality  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  Huguenots  humanitarian  human_nature  human_rights  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hutcheson  identity  identity-multiple  identity_politics  images-political  imperialism  import_substitution  incentives  India  Indian_religion  individualism  industrialization  inequality  inheritance  Innovation  Inquisition  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_change  institutions  intellectual_history  intelligence_agencies  interest_groups  international_law  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  Interregnum  interventionism  interview  IR-domestic_politics  IR-liberalism  Ireland  IR_theory  Islamist_fundamentalists  Islamophobia  Israel  Italy  James_I  James_II  Jesuits  Jim_Crow  journal  jstor  Judaism  judgment-independence  judgment-political  judicial_review  judiciary  July_Monarchy  jurisprudence  justice  just_war  Kant  Kant-ethics  kindle-available  labor  labor_history  labor_law  Lacan  laisser-faire  landed_interest  landowners  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  language-politics  law-and-economics  lawyers  LDCs  Lefort  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_realism  legal_reasoning  legal_system  legal_theory  legislation  legislature  legitimacy  Leibniz  Levellers  LGBT  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberal_democracy  libertarianism  liberty  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  libraries  lieux_de_mémoires  limited_liability  limited_monarchy  literary_history  local_government  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  luxury  MacIntyre  Madison  Magna_Carta  majoritarian  marginalized_groups  markets  marriage  Marx  media  Medieval  medieval_history  memory-cultural  MENA  mental_health  mercantilism  mercenaires  metaethics  metaphysics  middle_class  militarization-society  military-industrial  military_history  militia  mind  minorities  mixed_government  MNCs  modernity  modernization_theory  monarchy  monetary_policy  Montesquieu  morality-conventional  morality-objective  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  multiculturalism  Napoleonic_Wars  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  national_origins  national_security  national_tale  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_rights  Nedham  neo-Kantian  neo-republicanism  neoliberalism  Neoplatonism  networks  networks-business  networks-information  networks-policy  networks-religious  networks-social  neuroscience  newspapers  New_Confucianism  New_Testament  Norman_Conquest  norms  NSA  Nussbaum  obligation  Old_Testament  opposition  originalism  Orthodox_Christianity  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  paper  Parlement  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Parliamentary_supremacy  parties  Patriot_King  patronage  patrons  paywall  Peace_of_Amiens  perception  perpetual_peace  persecution  petitions  Petition_of_Right  Pettit  phenomenology  philosophes  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  physiology  pluralism  poetics  poetry  police  political_change  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_science  political_sociology  politics-and-money  politics-and-religion  populism  positivism  positivism-legal  post-colonial  post-WWII  poststructuralist  poverty  power  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  prerogative  primary_sources  privacy  privatization  professionalization  profit  profit_maximization  Progressive_Era  property  property-confiscations  property_rights  protectionism  Protectorate  Protestants  Protestants-Ireland  Protestant_International  psychology  public-private_partnerships  public_finance  public_opinion  public_sphere  Pufendorf  Puritans  Questia  Quine  racism  racism-structural  Radical_Enlightenment  rank  rationalist  rationality  Rawls  Raz  reason  recognition  Reconstruction  reform-economic  reform-legal  reform-political  reform-social  Reformation  reformation_of_manners  Reform_Act_1832  refugees  relativism  religion-established  religion-fundamentalism  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  religious_history  religious_lit  religious_wars  representation  representative_institutions  reproductive_rights  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Republic_of_Letters  reputation  resistance_theory  respect  responsibility  Restoration  Restoration-France  reviews  revisionism  Revolution_Principles  rhetoric-political  right-wing  rights-legal  rights-political  Romanticism  Rousseau  Royalists  rule_of_law  Russia  salvation  scepticism  scientism  Scottish_Enlightenment  SCOTUS  sectarianism  secularism  secularization  security  segregation  Sellars  separation-of-powers  sexuality  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  shareholders  shareholder_value  shareholder_voting  Shelley  Skinner  slavery  Smith  socialization  social_contract  social_history  social_movements  social_order  social_process  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  sociology  sociology_of_religion  soul  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  Spain  Spanish_Civil_War  Spinoza  Spinozism  spying  SSRN  state-building  state-of-nature  state_government  status  structuralism  subjectivity  suffrage  taxes  Taylor_Charles  tech  technical_assistance  terrorism  theocracy  theology  Thomism-21stC  Tocqueville  Toland  tolerance  Tolstoy  trade-policy  transition_economies  trust  Tudor  Tu_Weiming  tyranny  UK_government-colonies  unemployment  unions  universalism  urbanization  urban_development  urban_elites  urban_politics  US_constitution  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  US_legal_system  US_military  US_politics  US_politics-race  US_society  utilitarianism  utility  values  Vatican_II  video  Vietnam_War  virtue  voice  voluntarism  wages  Walzer  Weber  welfare_state  Whigs  white_flight  white_supremacy  Wiley  William_III  Wilson_Woodrow  Wollstonecraft  women  women-property  women-rights  Wordsworth  WWII  YouTube 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: