dunnettreader + charles_i   45

Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Kevin Killeen - Hanging up Kings: The Political Bible in Early Modern England | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 549-570 -- thinks the Biblical language in which so much 17thC political discourse, including the regicide, was conducted makes much of it out of our audible range, so he's undertaking some geological retrieval --:downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  Cromwell  Parliamentarians  political_discourse  republicanism  Milton  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
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january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
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december 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ethan H. Shagan, review - Derek Hirst, England in Conflict, 1603-1660: Kingdom, Community, Commonwealth | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2001), pp. 378-379
High marks for thoroughly updated successful textbook - focuses on high politics and sorts out the 3 kingdoms, antecedents to political and constitutional tensions from the 1620s, patterns of political alignments not capable of simplifying by "party", very well-written narrative -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Charles_I  English_constitution  Charles_I-personal_rule 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Woolf, review - Ken MacMillan, Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World: The Legal Foundations of Empire, 1576-1640 (2006) | JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 598-600
Cambridge University Press -- Looks well done - Woolf gives high marks for linking the interest of various players, including monarchs, with shifting ideologies and challenges of articulating a legal system that made sense with English ambitions, relations with other European colonial enterprises, and England's peculiar legal framework and its interactions with government - e.g. why the most elaborated jurisprudence, the Spanish, didn't fit with Fortescue commonwealth style thought and ticklish question of "conquest" -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
LLOYD BOWEN -- ROYALISM, PRINT, AND THE CLERGY IN BRITAIN, 1639–1640 AND 1642. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 297-319. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
LLOYD BOWEN - University of Cardiff -- Charles I and his clerical supporters are often said to have been wary of print and public discussion, only entering the public sphere reluctantly and to comparatively little effect during the political crisis of 1642. This article challenges such views by focusing on the neglected role of official forms of print such as proclamations, declarations, and state prayers and their promulgation in the nation's churches. It traces the ways in which the king utilized the network of parish clergy to broadcast his message and mobilize support during the Scottish crisis of 1639–40 and again in the ‘paper war’ of 1642. The article argues that traditional forms of printed address retained their potency and influence despite the proliferation of polemical pamphlets and newsbooks. The significance of these mobilizations is demonstrated by the profound disquiet they caused among the king's Covenanter and parliamentarian opponents as well as the ‘good effects’ they had in generating support for the royalist cause. -* I am most grateful to Mark Stoyle, Mark Kishlansky, John Walter, Jacqueline Eales, and the anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier drafts of this article. -- available for download
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Charles_I  propaganda  monarchy  Church_of_England  clergy  parish  politics-and-religion  political_culture  public_opinion  religious_culture  authority  political_order  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  prayers-state  religion-established  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARK KISHLANSKY -- A WHIPPER WHIPPED: THE SEDITION OF WILLIAM PRYNNE. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 603-627 Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MARK KISHLANSKY - Harvard University -- ‘A whipper whipped’ is a thoroughly new account of the 1634 Star Chamber case against William Prynne for publishing the seditious work Histrio-mastix. It is based upon a hitherto unused manuscript account that provides previously undisclosed information about the proceedings and especially about the intentions of the prosecution. This case is one of the most celebrated events of the 1630s, often viewed as the watershed event in the history of Caroline censorship. It has also become a prime example of Archbishop William Laud's attack against puritan conformists. This article argues that Laud played little role in the case; that the issue before Star Chamber was primarily the charge of sedition; and that Prynne received every possible legal advantage during his hearing. Through a careful reconstruction of the legal proceedings, the case is seen in an entirely new light. Though historians and literary critics have accepted Prynne's self-serving accounts of his prosecution, this fuller record demonstrates their inadequacy. -- made available for download - to Note
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  Church_of_England  Charles_I  Laud  Star_Chamber  censorship  Puritans  judiciary  legal_history  sedition  persecution  martyrs  revisionism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patriarcha, or the Natural Power of Kings - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha; of the Natural Power of Kings. By the Learned Sir Robert Filmer Baronet (London: Richard Chiswell, 1680). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/221> -- In the aftermath of the English Revolution which saw the execution of a king and the creation of a Commonwealth and the restoration of the monarchy, Filmer wrote a solid defense of the divine right of kings which in turn prompted John Locke to write a riposte – part 1 of the Two Treatises of Government. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  monarchy  Absolutism  hierarchy  social_order  family  authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  divine_right  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  English_Civil_War  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  political_press  Tories  High_Church  resistance_theory  Locke-1st_Treatise  Tyrrell  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard, vol. III of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 3. 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/913> -- Vol. 3 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains Coke’s speech in Parliament (inlcuding the Petiton of Right), a number of official acts related to Coke’s career, and other matters. -- also extensive bibliography, including on people and events, relevant to Coke’s career and thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed., 2000), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston - Online Library of Liberty
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed.), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/673> -- Though usually Edmund Burke is identified as the first to articulate the principles of a modern conservative political tradition, arguably he was preceded by a Scotsman who is better known for espousing a brilliant concept of skepticism. As Laurence Bongie notes, “David Hume was undoubtedly the eighteenth-century British writer whose works were most widely known and acclaimed on the Continent during the later Enlightenment period. Hume’s impact [in France] was of undeniable importance, greater even for a time than the related influence of Burke, although it represents a contribution to French counter-revolutionary thought which, unlike that of Burke, has been almost totally ignored by historians to this day.” The bulk of Bongie’s work consists of the writings of French readers of Hume who were confronted, first, by the ideology of human perfection and, finally, by the actual terrors of the French Revolution. Offered in French in the original edition of David Hume published by Oxford University Press in 1965, these vitally important writings have been translated by the author into English for the Liberty Fund second edition. In his foreword, Donald Livingston observes that “If conservatism is taken to be an intellectual critique of the first attempt at modern total revolution, then the first such event was not the French but the Puritan revolution, and the first systematic critique of this sort of act was given by Hume.” -- original on bookshelf - downloaded for Livingston foreword and translations
books  bookshelf  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  history_of_England  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  historians-and-politics  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Levellers  Interregnum  Protectorate  Charles_I  Cromwell  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  Terror  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  conservatism  Whigs-Radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard - 3 vols. set (2003) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). 3 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1884> -- A 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. Vol. 1 contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports [downloaded to Note]. Vol. 2 contains Coke’s Speech at Norwich, exerpts from the small treatises, and exerpts from the 4 parts of the Institutes. Vol. 3 contains Coke’s speech in Parliament (inlcuding the Petiton of Right), a number of official acts related to Coke’s career, and other matters.
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  James_I  Charles_I  Parliament  prerogative  common_law  commonwealth  taxes  ancient_constitution  lawyers  judiciary  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  English_constitution  legal_history  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  ancient_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  commonwealth  legislation  judiciary  civil_liberties  property  property_rights  James_I  Charles_I  taxes  prerogative  Magna_Carta  lawyers  equity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David R. Como - Predestination and Political Conflict in Laud's London | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 263-294
This article examines the policy pursued by William Laud during his tenure as bishop of London, focusing specifically on the way in which he enforced the various royal edicts against discussion of predestination. It is argued that Laud enforced Charles I's decrees in an unbalanced manner, attacking Calvinists while apparently leaving their anti-Calvinist opponents untouched. It is likewise argued, however, that this strategy was accomplished not through a policy of overt judicial persecution, but through a more subtle regime of quiet threat and harassment. Such a policy was necessary because, at least in London, the question of predestination had by 1629 become a serious and explosive issue, one that was inextricably linked in the minds of many observers to more explicitly 'secular' matters of government and policy. In the process of examining Laud's strategy, the article seeks to untangle the question of why both the Caroline authorities and their enemies saw the seemingly scholastic question of predestination as a matter of such crucial political significance. Ultimately, the article helps to revise our understanding of the political atmosphere that prevailed in England at the outset of the personal rule, while likewise contributing to a deeper understanding of the political breakdown that led to civil war and revolution in the 1640s. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  predestination  Calvinist  Arminian  Laud  Laudian  Puritans  godly_persons  London  City_politics  ecclesiology  clergy  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_culture  popular_politics  Absolutism  ritual  sacraments  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Questier - Arminianism, Catholicism, and Puritanism in England during the 1630s | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 53-78
The relationship between Arminianism and Roman Catholicism in the early Stuart period has long been a source of historiographical controversy. Many contemporaries were in no doubt that such an affinity did exist and that it was politically significant. This article will consider how far there was ideological sympathy and even rhetorical collaboration between Caroline Catholics and those members of the Church of England whom both contemporaries and modern scholars have tended to describe as Arminians and Laudians. It will suggest that certain members of the English Catholic community actively tried to use the changes which they claimed to observe in the government of the Church of England in order to establish a rapport with the Caroline regime. In particular they enthused about what they perceived as a strongly anti-puritan trend in royal policy. Some of them argued that a similar style of governance should be exercised by a bishop over Catholics in England. This was something which they believed would correct the factional divisions within their community and align it more effectively with the Stuart dynasty. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  Puritans  Laudian  Charles_I  ecclesiology  clergy  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  faction  popery  Catholics-England  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dewey D. Wallace, Jr., historiographical review - Via Media? A Paradigm Shift | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2003), pp. 2-21
Very useful - he was working in the same stream as Tyacke before publication of Anti-Calvinists. Follows subsequent work that's developed the approach of the Elizabethan church as Reformed with a hankering for bits of Kutheranism. Notes the parallels in tensions between established Erastian church and the hotter sort who wanted to push a second Reformation, following the Reformed scholasticim and the more extreme version of Calvinism post Calvin. Notes different versions of where the via media develooed (the anti Puritan divines connected with James I court, the Oxford Movement? ) - Wallace seems to think it's a Restoration phenomenon, when Hooker is "canonized", and later groups like the Oxford Movement reinforced the claim that the Church of England had pursued the via media, at least by Elizabeth, as a means of marginalizing the evangelical stream. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  religious_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  Reformation  Church_of_England  Calvinist  Lutherans  Arminian  via_media  Laudian  Elizabeth  clergy  godly_persons  Puritans  predestination  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  parish  local_politics  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  anti-Catholic  popery  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Walter - Popular Iconoclasm and the Politics of the Parish in Eastern England, 1640-1642 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 261-290
This article explores the extent of popular iconoclasm in England in the period immediately before the start of civil war and for a region - eastern England - thought to lie at the heart of these events. It explores systematically the evidence for the extent of destruction (and the problems in its recording and recovery), the nature of the targets attacked, and the identities of the iconoclasts. The article argues that this first phase of iconoclasm was directed largely against Laudian innovations. Claiming an agency to police sacred space, iconoclasts derived legitimation from the public condemnation of Laudianism in parliament, print, and pulpit. Narrowing the focus, the article moves on to explore the occurrence of iconoclasm through a series of case studies of the complex process of conflict and negotiation within the politics of the parish that preceded, accompanied, and sometimes pre-empted popular destruction. The evidence of iconoclasm is used to show how the implementation of the Laudian programme might politicize local churches as sites of conflict and the potential therefore inherent in its aggressive enforcement for a wider political conflict. -- interesting references -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  Laudian  Puritans  godly_persons  iconoclasm  parish  Charles_I  High_Church  local_politics  local_government  popular_politics  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Cogswell - John Felton, Popular Political Culture, and the Assassination of the Duke of Buckingham | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 2 (Jun., 2006), pp. 357-385
This article analyses the motivation behind John Felton's assassination of the duke of Buckingham in August 1628. It focuses attention on his family's tortured relationship with the regime, and it highlights Felton's military service in Spain, Ireland, and France. Wounded in the disastrous withdrawal from the Ile de Ré, he returned to London to convalesce, and there he slipped into the metropolitan 'underground' manuscript culture that was saturated with poems and tracts excoriating the duke. Finally he was able to witness the mounting violence in the city in the summer of 1628 that culminated in the murder of the duke's sorcerer, Dr Lamb. Felton's murder of the duke was far from inevitable, but as this article hopes to show, his ability to slot his own personal frustration into the increasingly virulent hostility to the favourite ultimately transformed Felton into the instrument of public retribution. -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  public_opinion  publishing  political_press  popular_politics  underground_culture  Charles_I  Buckingham_1st_Duke  public_disorder  violence  London  City_politics 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
L. J. Reeve - The Legal Status of the Petition of Right | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 257-277
Useful for bibliography and overview of century of revisionism and counter revisionism since Gardiner. See Kishlansky for further counter-counter revisionism on Petition of Right that places more blame on the radical enemies of Buckingham including Selden-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  historiography  revisionism  British_politics  legal_history  judiciary  legislation  Petition_of_Right  petitions  Charles_I  Parliament  prerogative  civil_liberties  public_finance  taxes  common_law  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Kishlansky - Tyranny Denied: Charles I, Attorney General Heath, and the Five Knights' Case | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Mar., 1999), pp. 53-83
This article exonerates Charles I and Attorney General Sir Robert Heath from charges that they tampered with the records of the court of King's Bench in the Five Knights' Case. It refutes allegations made by John Selden in the parliament of 1628 and repeated by modern historians. Selden's attack on Heath and the king's government was based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of King's Bench enrolments and a radical view of the crown's intentions in imprisoning loan resisters. The view that Charles was attempting to establish the prerogative right to imprison opponents without remedy at common law has no basis in either the arguments presented during the Five Knights' Case or the king's behaviour both before and during the parliament. By accepting the most radical critique of Caroline government at face value, historians have concluded that Charles was attempting to establish a `legal tyranny'. This article rejects these views. -- among other criticisms, notes that historians following Pocock have elevated a "common law mentality" to the heart of 17thC political culture, thereby underestimating the radicalism of Selden, Coke et al in forcing the confrontation that converted the Petition of Right into a non-negotiable statue that was subsequently used in proceedings against the king's actions during Personal Rule -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Charles_I  Parliament  taxes  counselors  Selden  common_law  prerogative  Pocock  ancient_constitution  Coke  political_culture  judiciary  habeas_corpus  sovereign_debt  public_finance  British_foreign_policy  Petition_of_Right  legislation  bibliography  revisionism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Cressy - Revolutionary England 1640-1642 | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 181 (Nov., 2003), pp. 35-71
Both an historiographical review of the revisionism debates on the English Civil War and n elaboration of Cressy views that inform his work on the 17thC -- Sees decline and rise of Charles I position linked to explosion of revolutions in every category of English society - not only political and religious - and Parliamentarians failure to manage or bring under control. Civil War when governing class, long anxious re social change, took different sides in what to be done. The conflict continued to play out the next 2 decades. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  change-social  social_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  church_history  politics-and-religion  monarchy  Absolutism  mixed_government  middle_class  lower_orders  public_sphere  public_opinion  local_government  godly_persons  Laudian  Church_of_England  Puritans  Presbyterians  City_politics  merchants  mercantilism  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  elite_culture  landed_interest  gentry  court_culture  courtiers  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  James_I  Charles_I  downloaded  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael J. Braddick - Popular Politics and Public Policy: The Excise Riot at Smithfield in February 1647 and Its Aftermath | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1991), pp. 597-626
Historiographical split between those who see excise protests as political instability and economic historians who love excise taxes for all the revenue it brings in - need a better approach to linking public protest and policies -- part of Braddick program on public finance and where policies actually played out so useful historiography and bibliography-- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  social_history  economic_history  political_culture  public_finance  public_disorder  popular_politics  political_economy  17thC  British_politics  excise  taxes  riots  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  crowds  protests  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. F. Merritt - Puritans, Laudians, and the Phenomenon of Church-Building in Jacobean London | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 935-960
The comprehensive neglect of English church buildings in the century after the Reformation until the advent of Archbishop Laud has long stood as one of the standard readings of English church history. This article argues that attitudes towards the building and repair of churches in the pre-Laudian period were far more complex than has previously been recognized. It documents a sustained revival of church building and beautification in London that took place well before Laud's emergence, and which is inexplicable without reference to a whole range of practical and social, as well as religious, forces. This evidence, however, should not lead us to downplay the novelty and distinctiveness of the Laudian building programme. Rather, it is suggested here that Laudian polemic advanced a specific view of puritanism as incorporating a profane neglect and contempt of both church services and of the building which housed them. It is this vision of puritan neglect that not only provided a justification for Laudian changes to church practices and interiors in the 1630s, but which has also deflected the attention of later historians away from programmes of church repair in the reign of James I.
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  London  Church_of_England  church_history  architecture  James_I  Charles_I  Laud  Puritans  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexandra Walsham - "The Fatall Vesper": Providentialism and Anti-Popery in Late Jacobean London | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 144 (Aug., 1994), pp. 36-87
Radical anti-Catholic sentiments and commercial publishing fanned the flames of reaction to the collapse of the chapel where 300 were celebrating a service with a famous foreign Jesuit. Reading or decoding the signs of what was seen as from God produced major controversy that got tangled with Church of England politics and foreign policy, which was starting to switch after Spanish match debacle. Still reverberated into the 1680s. -- didn't download
article  jstor  religious_history  political_history  British_history  Church_of_England  anti-Catholic  popular_politics  political_press  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  pamphlets  London  Providence  James_I  Charles_I  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-Spanish  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gerald P. Bodet: Sir Edward Coke's Third Institutes: A Primer for Treason Defendants (1970)
JSTOR: The University of Toronto Law Journal, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Autumn, 1970), pp. 469-477 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  legal_history  political_history  commercial_law  James_I  Charles_I  treason  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Theodore K. Rabb: The Role of the Commons [in Early Stuart conflict] | P& P 1981
JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 92 (Aug., 1981), pp. 55-78 -- papers contra 17thC English history revisionism (eg Sharpe, Russell) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Parliament  House_of_Commons  political_culture  James_I  Charles_I  religious_culture  fiscal_policy  foreign_policy  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst: The Place of Principle [in Early Stuart conflict] (1981) | P&P
JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 92 (Aug., 1981), pp. 79-99 -- with T Rabb on role of Commons responding to Early Stuart revisionists (eg Sharpe, Russell)-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  17thC  Britain  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  UK_Government  local_government  aristocracy  political_culture  religious_culture  Puritans  Church_of_England  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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