dunnettreader + center-periphery   8

Judith Herrin - Margins and Metropolis: Authority across the Byzantine Empire. (eBook, Paperback and Hardcover 2016) - Princeton University Press
1st volume of 2 covering her 40 year career - This volume explores the political, cultural, and ecclesiastical forces that linked the metropolis of Byzantium to the margins of its far-flung empire. Focusing on the provincial region of Hellas and Peloponnesos in central and southern Greece, Judith Herrin shows how the prestige of Constantinople was reflected in the military, civilian, and ecclesiastical officials sent out to govern the provinces. She evokes the ideology and culture of the center by examining different aspects of the imperial court, including diplomacy, ceremony, intellectual life, and relations with the church. Particular topics treat the transmission of mathematical manuscripts, the burning of offensive material, and the church's role in distributing philanthropy.

Herrin contrasts life in the capital with provincial life, tracing the adaptation of a largely rural population to rule by Constantinople from the early medieval period onward. The letters of Michael Choniates, archbishop of Athens from 1182 to 1205, offer a detailed account of how this highly educated cleric coped with life in an imperial backwater, and demonstrate a synthesis of ancient Greek culture and medieval Christianity that was characteristic of the Byzantine elite.

This collection of essays spans the entirety of Herrin's influential career and draws together a significant body of scholarship on problems of empire. It features a general introduction, two previously unpublished essays, and a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader analysis of the unusual brilliance and longevity of Byzantium.

Judith Herrin is the Constantine Leventis Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London. She is the author of Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire, Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, and The Formation of Christendom (all Princeton). -- downloaded Introduction to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  medieval_history  empires  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_culture  empires-governance  Islam  Islamic_civilization  ancient_Greece  Christianity  Christendom  elite_culture  urban_elites  rural  center-periphery  Orthodox_Christianity  Roman_Catholicism  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  manuscripts  iconoclasm  philanthropy  intelligentsia  church_history  theology  Islam-expansion  Christianity-Islam_conflict 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Fiscal federalism network - OECD
The OECD Network on Fiscal Relations across Levels of Government provides analysis and statistical underpinnings on the relationship between central and subcentral government, and its impact on efficiency, equity and macroeconomic stability. -- Main page for reports, white papers, guides, articles, links to OECD databases
OECD  website  OECD_economies  taxes  tax_collection  fiscal_policy  state_government  cities  federalism  sovereign_debt  public_finance  statistics  databases  report  links  accountability  reform-economic  reform-finance  reform-legal  comparative_economics  centralization  central_government  center-periphery  local_government  decentralization 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Dragovich - A Comparison Of Republican Roman and Han Chinese Barbarian Relations (2009 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2009 -- posted on History of the Ancient World website -- Abstract: Throughout the course of human history, the interaction and conflict between civilization and barbarism, whether real or perceived, has existed in historical memory. The conflict, which spans continents and centuries, can be found in the historical writings of many sedentary civilizations, who felt a need to differentiate between “Us” and “Them.” In fact, many early civilizations defined themselves in the presence of groups which they considered barbarous.The project looks at two civilizations which had such interactions. Late Republican Rome and Han China are well known for their conflicts with peripheral groups. This thesis compares how these two empires conquered and assimilated these barbarian groups, namely the Roman conquest of Gaul and the Chinese conquest of the Xiongnu, a nomadic people that inhabited modern day Mongolia. Despite these two empires separation by time and geography, their methods of conquest were very similar. Where they differed was in their assimilation of conquered peoples, a difference which stems from the way the two civilizations defined themselves.By comparing these events in history, we can gain an insight into the topic which can not be achieved by studying each civilization individually. The interface of disparate cultures is at the heart of many modern issues, from immigration to the war on terror. By studying these past events, it can be seen that this aspect of the human experience not only transcends East and West but also the centuries that separate us from the ancient world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Han_China  Chinese_history  barbarians  center-periphery  conquest  national_ID  military_history  militarization-society  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Arlene B. Tickner: Core, periphery and (neo)imperialist International Relations | Special Issue End of IR Theory? - European Journal of International Relations September 2013
,Professor of International Relations, Political Science Department, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia --- This article analyzes the core–periphery dynamics that characterize the International Relations discipline. To this end, it explores general insights offered by both science studies and the social sciences in terms of the intellectual division of labor that characterizes knowledge-building throughout the world, and the social mechanisms that reproduce power differentials within given fields of study. These arguments are then applied to International Relations, where specific factors that explain the global South’s role as a periphery to the discipline’s (mainly US) core and the ways in which peripheral communities place themselves vis-à-vis International Relations’ (neo)imperialist structure are both explored. --- doi: 10.1177/1354066113494323, European Journal of International Relations, September 2013 vol. 19 no. 3, 627-646 --- uploaded to Dropbox
article  IR_theory  global_system  international_political_economy  sociology_of_knowledge  center-periphery  neo-imperialism  social_sciences-post-WWII  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David Hancock: "A World of Business to Do": William Freeman and the Foundations of England's Commercial Empire, 1645-1707 (2000)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 57, No. 1 (Jan., 2000), pp. 3-34 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- records of an early colonial commission agent shows how institutions of the transatlantic commission merchandising system grew organically to address principal-agent problems -- illustrates differences between agriculturally oriented production and commercial British Atlantic empire from Spanish extractive bureaucratic and the French and Dutch commercial empires. Each mercantilist but in distinctive manner. Implications of differences for settlement, governance, center and periphery relations, and cross periphery relations.
article  jstor  economic_history  institutional_economics  economic_sociology  political_economy  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  center-periphery  commerce  agriculture  trade  merchants  entrepreneurs  planters  landowners  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

13thC  14thC  15thC  17thC  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  accountability  agriculture  American_colonies  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  Anglo-French  Anglo-Norman  Anglo-Scot  aristocracy  article  Atlantic  banking  barbarians  bibliography  books  Britain-Continent  British_Empire  British_Empire-military  British_history  British_politics  Byzantium  capital_as_power  capital_markets  center-periphery  centralization  central_government  Chinese_history  Christendom  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  church_history  cities  clubs  commerce  commerce-doux  comparative_economics  conquest  cultural_history  databases  decentralization  downloaded  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_sociology  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  empires  empires-governance  Enlightenment  entrepreneurs  federalism  finance_capital  fiscal_policy  France  Freemasonry  French_history  global_system  Han_China  historical_change  historical_sociology  historiography  history_of_science  Hundred_Years_War  iconoclasm  imperialism  institutional_economics  intellectual_history  intelligentsia  international_political_economy  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  IR_theory  Islam  Islam-expansion  Islamic_civilization  jstor  judiciary  kindle-available  landowners  latitudinarian  links  local_government  manuscripts  medieval_history  merchants  militarization-society  military_history  MPs  nation-state  national_ID  natural_religion  neo-imperialism  networks  networks-business  networks-political  networks-social  Newtonian  OECD  OECD_economies  Orthodox_Christianity  Parliament  patronage  philanthropy  planters  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_nation  politics-and-religion  professionalization  professions  provinces  public_finance  reform-economic  reform-finance  reform-legal  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  report  reviews  Richelieu  Roman_Catholicism  Roman_Republic  rural  science-and-politics  science-and-religion  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  Scotland  Scottish_history  social_capital  social_sciences-post-WWII  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  sovereign_debt  state_government  statistics  taxes  tax_collection  theology  thesis  trade  urban_elites  Wales  Walpole  War_of_the_Roses  website  West_Indies  Whigs-oligarchy 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: