dunnettreader + britannia + political_culture   2

OLIVER J. W. COX -- FREDERICK, PRINCE OF WALES, AND THE FIRST PERFORMANCE OF ‘RULE, BRITANNIA!’ (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 931-954. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
OLIVER J. W. COX - University College, Oxford -- The words and music of ‘Rule, Britannia!’ are synonymous with the expansionist, triumphalist, and imperialist Britain symbolized by fluttering Union Jacks on the Last Night of the Proms. This article explores the cultural and political contexts of the first performance of this important national cultural artefact as the finale of Alfred: a masque to suggest that this opening night served a very different purpose. The first audience was a court in exile from the metropolitan heart of London, popular amongst the general public, but without any prospects of government. Two of the most important members of this group of peers, politicians, poets and a prince had recently died, and with them any cohesive identity. Alfred is both a desperate plea for unity, a rallying cry which forcefully restated the key tenets of this group's identity, and a delayed expression of patriotic celebration occasioned by Admiral Vernon's capture of Portobello. Through addressing this performance, this article makes an important contribution to our understanding of Hanoverian political culture and highlights the continuing impact of Anglo-Saxon England on mid-eighteenth-century Britain. -* For comments and advice on earlier versions of my argument, I am grateful to Dr Hannah Smith and Dr Geoffrey Tyack. - Thanks are also due to John and Virginia Murray who ensured archival work at 50 Albemarle Street was always a pleasure.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1740s  Whigs-opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  George_II  Walpole  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Britannia  Bolingbroke  Mallet  political_culture  political_nation  political_spectacle  theater  theatre-politics  elite_culture  patriotism  Anglo-Saxons  cultural_authority  cultural_pessimism  War_of_Austrian_Succession  British_Navy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARTHA VANDREI - A VICTORIAN INVENTION? THOMAS THORNYCROFT'S ‘BOADICEA GROUP’ AND THE IDEA OF HISTORICAL CULTURE IN BRITAIN | The Historical Journal - Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 485-508 - Abstract - Cambridge Journals Online -
King's College London -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X14000119, Published online: 08 May 2014 -- This article examines the figure of Boudica (or Boadicea), with a specific focus on Thomas Thornycroft's Westminster Bridge statue, and on the work of the seventeenth-century antiquary, Edmund Bolton. By synthesizing historiography which investigates the idea of ‘historical culture’ in the modern and early modern periods, this article attempts to bridge chronological and generic divisions which exist in the study of the history of history. It argues that to fully understand the genealogy of popular historical ideas like Boudica, it is imperative that historians of such subjects take a longue-durée approach that situates individual artists and writers, and the historical-cultural works they produce, within their broader political, cultural, and social contexts while simultaneously viewing these works as part of a long, discursive process by which the past is successively reinterpreted. As a consequence, this article eschews an analysis of Boudica which labels her an ‘imperial icon’ for Victorian Britons, and argues that the relationship between contemporary context and the re-imagined past is not as straightforward as it might initially appear. -- paywall -- may be interesting for development of Britannia imagery relevant to Bolingbroke and Patriots
article  paywall  find  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  cultural_history  antiquaries  British_history  British_politics  national_ID  art_history  literary_history  political_culture  Victorian  usable_past  iconography  periodization  Britannia  patriotism  Patriots  British_Empire  imperialism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader

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