dunnettreader + bourgeoisie   26

Acemoglu, Cantoni, Johnson
The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution
Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson and James A. Robinson
The American Economic Review
Vol. 101, No. 7 (DECEMBER 2011), pp. 3286-3307
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
commerce  urbanization  guilds  elites  republicanism  reform-legal  Rhineland  reform-political  Germany  economic_growth  political_economy  reform-economic  jstor  political_history  civil_code  French_Revolution  rule_of_law  institutional_economics  bourgeoisie  aristocracy  trade  article  downloaded  feudalism  economic_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Louli, review - Emmanuel Fureix, François Jarrige, La modernité désenchantée - La Vie des idées - 10 juin 2015
Recensé : Emmanuel Fureix, François Jarrige, La modernité désenchantée, La Découverte 2015, 390 p., 25 €. -- Le XIXe siècle a longtemps été tenu pour le siècle du progrès. L’historiographie récente est plus attentive à ses contradictions et à ses aléas. Deux historiens proposent une histoire de l’histoire du XIXe siècle, illustrant la manière dont notre société se regarde elle-même. -- Ceci n’est pas un manuel sur le XIXe siècle, pourrait-on dire, en paraphrasant Magritte, à la première lecture de La modernité désenchantée. L’ouvrage des deux dix-neuvièmistes reconnus que sont E. Fureix et F. Jarrige est autrement plus ambitieux, et cherche à « esquisser un état des lieux (incomplet) de la façon dont les historiens d’aujourd’hui renouvellent les lectures du XIXe siècle, dans sa singularité » -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  modernity  modernity-emergence  progress  cultural_history  cultural_change  cultural_critique  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  science-and-religion  science-and-politics  French_politics  working_class  bourgeoisie  national_ID  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeff Horn - Economic Development in Early Modern France: The Privilege of Liberty, 1650–1820 (release date for hardback mid-Feb 2015) | European history after 1450 | Cambridge University Press
Privilege has long been understood as the constitutional basis of Ancien Régime France, legalising the provision of a variety of rights, powers and exemptions to some, whilst denying them to others. In this fascinating new study however, Jeff Horn reveals that Bourbon officials utilized privilege as an instrument of economic development, freeing some sectors of the economy from pre-existing privileges and regulations, while protecting others. He explores both government policies and the innovations of entrepreneurs, workers, inventors and customers to uncover the lived experience of economic development from the Fronde to the Restoration. He shows how, influenced by Enlightenment thought, the regime increasingly resorted to concepts of liberty to defend privilege as a policy tool. The book offers important new insights into debates about the impact of privilege on early industrialisation, comparative economic development and the outbreak of the French Revolution. **--** 1. Introduction: profits and economic development during the Old Régime *--* 2. Privileged enclaves and the guilds: liberty and regulation *--* 3. The privilege of liberty put to the test: industrial development in Normandy *--* 4. Companies, colonies, and contraband: commercial privileges under the Old Régime *--* 5. Privilege, liberty, and managing the market: trading with the Levant *--* 6. Outside the body politic, essential to the body economic: the privileges of Jews, Protestants and foreign residents *--* 7. Privilege, innovation, and the state: entrepreneurialism and the lessons of the Old Régime *--* 8. The reign of liberty? Privilege after 1789 -- look for pdf of Intro once released
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  privileges-corporate  economic_culture  economic_policy  development  monarchy  profit  entrepreneurs  guilds  trading_companies  trade-policy  regulation  industrialization  industrial_policy  Colbert  Colbertism  urban_development  urban_elites  commerce  commercial_interest  French_government  Huguenots  Jews  colonialism  French_Empire  colonies  corporate_finance  monopolies  Levant  MENA  Ottomans  liberties  liberty  Ancien_régime  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  haute_bourgeoisie  markets  markets-structure  foreign_trade  foreign_policy  foreigners-resident 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (2012) Kindle Price:$17.60 - 840 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Includes Scottish late transition from feudalism and a different angle on Scot and English historiography in 17thC re "feudal law", "ancient constitution", James I & VI etc than Pocock's version -- earlier books on 16thC-18thC Scotland look very interesting -- In this panoramic historical analysis, Davidson defends a renovated concept of bourgeois revolution. He shows how our globalized societies of the present are the result of a contested, turbulent history marked by often forceful revolutions directed against old social orders, from the Dutch Revolt to the English and American Civil Wars and beyond. -- Review *--* " What should our conception of a bourgeois revolution be, if it is to enlighten rather than to mislead ? Davidson’s instructive and provocative answer is given through a history both of a set of concepts and of those social settings in which they found application.His book is an impressive contribution both to the history of ideas and to political philosophy.” —ALASDAIR MACINTYRE. *--* “Davidson wends his way through the jagged terrain of a wide range of Marxist writings and debates to distill their lessons in what is unquestionably the most thorough discussion of the subject to date. If the paradox at the heart of the bourgeois revolutions was that the emergence of the modern bourgeois state had little to do with the agency of the bourgeoisie, then Davidson’s study is by far the most nuanced and illuminating discussion of this complex fact.” —JAIRUS BANAJI, Theory as History “[This] is a monumental work. ...easily the most comprehensive account yet of the ‘life and times’ of the concept of ‘bourgeois revolution.’ . . . He has also provided us with a refined set of theoretical tools for understanding the often complex interactions between political revolutions which overturn state institutions and social revolutions which involve a more thoroughgoing transformation of social relations.” —COLIN MOOERS, The Making of Bourgeois Europe
books  kindle-available  buy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_history  social_history  intellectual_history  social_order  Europe-Early_Modern  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Marxist  Dutch_Revolt  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1745_rebellion  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  German_unification  Italian_unification  Russian_revolution  class_conflict  feudalism  ancient_constitution  aristocracy  Ancien_régime  liberalism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_Civil_War  political_culture  political_economy  capitalism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - Discovering The Scottish Revolution 1692-1746 (2003) 400 pages : pbk 9780745320533: Amazon.com: Books
This major new work of historical scholarship offers a groundbreaking reassessment of Scottish politics and society in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century that is set to become a standard work on the subject. Neil Davidson argues that Scotland experienced a revolution during this period that has rarely been recognised in the existing historiography. Davidson explores the political and economic changes of these years, revealing how social and economic power was transferred from one class to another. He describes how Scotland was transformed from a backward and feudal economy to a new centre of emergent capitalism. He traces the economic and social crisis that led to Scotland's incorporation into the Union in 1707, but argues that the Union did not lead to the transformation of Scottish society. The decisive period was instead the aftermath of the last Jacobite revolt in 1746, whose failure was integral to the survival and consolidation of British, and ultimately global capitalism. 'His opinions are bound to cause controversy and discussion . . . a good thing as Scottish history desperately needs the airing and voicing of new approaches.' John R Young, Albion. 'What is so good about Neil Davidson's brave study is that he brings a Marxist perspective to bear on Scottish history in very clear and readable prose. Quotations and statistics drawn from uncannily wide reading will make this book of great value even to those who disagree with it.' Angus Calder, author of Revolutionary Empire and Revolving Culture: Notes from the Scottish Republic -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find  17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  landed_interest  aristocracy  feudalism  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  1745_rebellion  Marxist  change-social  social_order  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Ross - The Naysayers: Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and the critique of pop culture | The New Yorker - September 15 2014
Benjamin, whose dizzyingly varied career skirted the edges of the Frankfurt collective, receives the grand treatment in “Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life” (Harvard), by Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings, who earlier edited Harvard’s four-volume edition of Benjamin’s writings. The Frankfurt School never presented a united front.... One zone in which they clashed was that of mass culture. Benjamin saw the popular arena as a potential site of resistance, from which left-leaning artists like Charlie Chaplin could transmit subversive signals. Adorno and Horkheimer viewed pop culture as an instrument of economic and political control, enforcing conformity behind a permissive screen. The “culture industry,” as they called it, offered the “freedom to choose what is always the same.” A similar split appeared in attitudes toward traditional forms of culture: classical music, painting, literature. Benjamin, in his resonant sentence linking culture and barbarism, saw the treasures of bourgeois Europe as spoils in a victory procession, each work blemished by the suffering of nameless millions. -- Between them, Adorno and Benjamin were pioneers in thinking critically about pop culture—in taking that culture seriously as an object of scrutiny, whether in tones of delight, dismay, or passionate ambivalence. The worst that one Frankfurt School theorist could say of another was that his work was insufficiently dialectical. The word “dialectic,” as elaborated in the philosophy of Hegel, causes endless problems for people who are not German, and even for some who are. In a way, it is both a philosophical concept and a literary style. --It “mediates,” to use a favorite Frankfurt School word. And it gravitates toward doubt, demonstrating the “power of negative thinking,” as Herbert Marcuse once put it. Such twists and turns come naturally in the German language, whose sentences are themselves plotted in swerves, releasing their full meaning only with the final clinching action of the verb.-- Although Marx was central to their thought, they were nearly as skeptical of Communist ideology as they were of the bourgeois mind-set that Communism was intended to supplant. “At the very heart of Critical Theory was an aversion to closed philosophical systems,” Martin Jay writes, in his history “The Dialectical Imagination” (1973).
books  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  Germany  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  Benjamin  Adorno  cultural_critique  mass_culture  high_culture  aesthetics  literary_history  lit_crit  art_history  music_history  cinema  dialectic  bourgeoisie  capitalism  culture_industries  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Liberty Matters Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
David M. Hart, The Collected Liberty Matters: Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014), ed. David M. Hart and Sheldon Richman (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014). 08/23/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2629> -- This volume is a collection of the first ten “Liberty Matters” online discussion forums which began in January 2013 and have appeared every two months since. The discussions have focused on authors whose work is well represented in the Online Library of Liberty. A leading scholar is asked to write an interpretative essay about a chosen author, to which other invited scholars respond in a formal essay which is then followed by a free form discussion over the ensuing month. The topics have included “John Locke on Property”, “James Buchanan: An Assessment”, “Gustave de Molinari’s Legacy for Liberty”, “Bastiat and Political Economy”, “George Smith on the System of Liberty”, “Arthur Seldon and the Institute of Economic Affairs”, “Ludwig von Mises’s The Theory of Money and Credit at 101”, “Hugo Grotius on War and the State”, “Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited”, and “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas”.
books  etexts  downloaded  political_philosophy  political_economy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  liberalism  liberty  IR_theory  Grotius  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Mises  Buchanan  public_choice  Tocqueville  Bastiat  McCloskey  virtue_ethics  bourgeoisie  property  property_rights  libertarianism  liberty-negative  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ALEXIS D. LITVINE, review essay - THE INDUSTRIOUS REVOLUTION, THE INDUSTRIOUSNESS DISCOURSE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ECONOMIES (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 531-570. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ALEXIS D. LITVINE - Trinity College, Cambridge -- The idea of industriousness has been an ever-recurring issue since Max Weber launched it as a putative explanation of the advent of economic modernity. The notion of ‘industrious revolution’ has provoked a renewed flourishing of publications focusing on this issue. Although most historians agree on the emergence of industriousness in seventeenth-century Europe, there is no consensus regarding the chronology, hence the real causes, of this mental and discursive shift. This article emphasizes the problematic role played by literary evidences in these social and cultural models of diffusion of new consumer values and desires. It then establishes the timing of the emergence of the ‘industriousness discourse’ using an original approach to diffusion based both on the quantitative analysis of very large corpora and a close reading of seventeenth-century economic pamphlets and educational literature. It concludes first that there was not one but several competing discourses on industriousness. It then identifies two crucial hinges which closely match the chronology proposed by Allen and Muldrew, but refutes that championed by de Vries and McCloskey. The industrious revolution as described by these authors would have happened both too late to fit its intellectual roots and too early to signal the beginning of a ‘consumer revolution’. -- * I am extremely grateful to Peter Mandler, Craig Muldrew, participants in the Early Modern Economic and Social History seminar, and two anonymous referees, for their comments on previous versions of this article. I am also indebted to Andrew Hardie, Jean-Baptiste Michel, and Paul Schaffner for allowing me to use their data and to Billy Janitsch, Andreas Vlachos, and Andrew Wilson for technical assistance.
article  paywall  find  historiography  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  economic_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  social_order  consumerism  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  virtue  discourse  bourgeoisie  modernity-emergence  education  values  publishing  readership  Protestant_Ethic  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Thompson - After the Fall: Class and Political Language in Britain, 1780-1900 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 785-806
The fall of class in nineteenth-century British history has become a familiar tale. Its rise in the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain has been less noted. This essay explores the reasons for this divergence and emphasizes its methodological origins. It highlights the need for a comprehensive history of class society and identity to replace the confused and contradictory picture of particular classes and communities that is currently on offer. To understand better the constitution of class society, it urges historians to talk less of consciousness and more of identity and to recognize that class is an imagined community much like any other. It proceeds to use this understanding of class identity to assess the turn to political language amongst social historians interested in class. The paper offers a sustained examination of the recent work of Joyce and Wahrman in particular and argues that insufficient attention has been paid to the variety of usable political languages and to the particular discursive contexts in which they are employed. It is argued that to acknowledge that class is so constructed is not to deny its existence or its importance and that historians need to look beyond political discourse to explain how class became so central to the self and the social in the nineteenth century. -- extensive references on British social history as well as postmodern historiography debates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  social_history  political_history  cultural_history  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  classes  class_conflict  working_class  middle_class  lower_orders  elites  elite_culture  popular_culture  bourgeoisie  identity  identity_politics  political_participation  political_press  rhetoric-political  aristocracy  gentry  gentleman  social_order  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Morality Critics [chapter] :: SSRN - in THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY, B. Leiter & M. Rosen, eds., Oxford University Press, 2007
U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 114 -- One striking feature of post-Kantian philosophy in Europe has been the emergence of morality critics, philosophers who, contra the popular consensus, dispute the value of morality and the moral life. Their views find a faint echo in the work of some Anglophone moral philosophers (Philippa Foot and Bernard Williams are the main exemplars), but, as we will see, the "Continental" criticisms of morality generally cut far deeper and more radically. -- These Continental morality critics object that morality in practice is an obstacle to human flourishing itself. So understood, this attack on morality raises two immediate questions. First, the Continental morality critics are plainly not without ethical views of their own - ..broadly, about the good life for (some or all) human beings - since it is on the basis of these views that they criticize "morality." -- we can usefully divide Continental critics of morality into two camps: .... In the first camp ... see the individual's acceptance of morality as such as an obstacle to the individual's flourishing; in different ways, Nietzsche and Freud .... In the second camp ... see morality as among the "ideological" instruments that sustain socio-economic relations that are obstacles to individual flourishing. On this second account - ..Marx and perhaps some of ..the Frankfurt School - it is not allegiance to morality per se that thwarts individual flourishing, but rather the role such allegiance plays in sustaining certain socio-economic relations.. We will call the former "Direct Morality Critics" and the latter "Indirect Morality Critics." (Foucault straddles both approaches, and so we will discuss him in a transitional section.) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  metaethics  continental_philosophy  cultural_critique  Germany  France  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Frankfurt_School  Foucault  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  normativity  human_nature  social_order  ideology  bourgeoisie  power  morality-critics  Williams_Bernard  values  ethics  human_condition  flourishing  Aristotelian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nico Voigtländer, Mara Squicciarini, Knowledge elites, enlightenment, and industrialisation | vox 13 July 2014
Although studies of contemporary economies find robust associations between human capital and growth, past research has found no link between worker skills and the onset of industrialisation. This column resolves the puzzle by focusing on the upper tail of the skill distribution, which is strongly associated with industrial development in 18th-century France. -- uses density of subscriptions to the Encyclopédie to analyze spatial distribution of knowledge elites which they find strongly associated with industrialization post 1750.
economic_history  economic_growth  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  18thC  19thC  academies  elite_culture  bourgeoisie  nobility  technology  Innovation  sociology_of_knowledge  knowledge_economy  education  literacy  Encyclopédie  scientific_culture  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law [c 1750, tran 1763], trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. Peter Korkman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law, trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. and with an Introduction by Peter Korkman (Indianpolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1717> -- The basis of this version of The Principles of Natural and Politic Law is Thomas Nugent’s 1763 English translation, which became a standard textbook at Cambridge and at many premier American colleges, including Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania. The first scholarly work on Burlamaqui was written by an American, M. Ray Forrest Harvey, who in 1937 argued that Burlamaqui was well known among America’s Founding Fathers and that his writings exerted considerable influence on the American constitutional system. In his introduction, Nugent said of Burlamaqui: “His singular beauty consists in the alliance he so carefully points out between ethics and jurisprudence, religion and politics, after the example of Plato and Tully, and the other illustrious masters of antiquity.”
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  intellectual_history  natural_law  political_philosophy  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  sovereignty  Geneva  Calvinist  natural_rights  mixed_government  aristocracy-natural  elites  bourgeoisie  democracy  authority  legitimacy  civil_liberties  civil_religion  happiness  rationalist  Grotius  Pufendorf  Barbeyrac  Leibniz  Rousseau  governing_class  government-forms  governance  state-building  state-of-nature  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (2012) eBook: Amazon.com
Biddick explores the 19thC foundations of medieval studies as an academic discipline as well as certain unexamined contemporary consequences of these origins. By pairing debates over current academic trends and issues with innovative readings of medieval texts, Biddick exposes the presuppositions of the field of medieval studies and significantly shifts the objects of its historical inquiry. Biddick describes how the discipline of medieval studies was defined by a process of isolation and exclusion—a process that not only ignored significant political and cultural issues of the 19thC but also removed the period from the forces of history itself. Wanting to separate themselves from popular studies of medieval culture, and valuing their own studies as scientific, 19thC academics created an exclusive discipline whose structure is consistently practiced today, despite the denials of most contemporary medieval scholars. Biddick supports her argument by discussing the unavowed melancholy that medieval Christians felt for Jews and by revealing the unintentional irony of nineteenth-century medievalists’ fabrication of sentimental objects of longing (such as the “gothic peasant”). The subsequent historical distortions of this century-old sentimentality, the relevance of worker dislocation during the industrial revolution, and other topics lead to a conclusion in which Biddick considers the impact of an array of factors on current medieval studies. Simultaneously displacing disciplinary stereotypes and altering an angle of historical inquiry, this book will appeal to readers who are interested in how historicizing processes can affect the development of academic disciplines
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  medieval_history  19thC  historicism  social_history  economic_culture  political_culture  intelligentsia  Industrial_Revolution  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  academia  disciplines  scientism  national_ID  folklore  nostalgia  sentimentalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's 2009 Voltaire lecture on 'The Guilt of Science?: Race, Science and Darwinism'
By the end of the eighteenth century, then, scientists had constructed a taxonomy of nature into which humans could be fitted and out of which emerged the categories of race. This seems to lend credibility to the view that it is modernity itself, and in particular the Enlightenment, that give rise both to the idea of race and to the practice of racism. ‘Eighteenth century Europe was the cradle of racism’, the historian George Mosse, argues because ‘racism has its foundations’ in the Enlightenment ‘preoccupation with a rational universe, nature and aesthetics.’ To see why this is not the case, we need to look more closely at how Enlightenment thinkers viewed the concept of human differences. -- If any event could demonstrate the folly of giving into unreason, it is surely Nazism and the Holocaust. Yet now it is regarded as an expression of too much reason.There is no intrinsic link between the idea of race and a rational or scientific view of the world. On the contrary: what made ideas of race plausible were the growth of political sentiments hostile to both the rationalism and the humanism of the Enlightenment.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  racialism  species  biology  evolutionary_biology  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  reason  Nazis  Holocaust  imperialism  slavery  civilizing_process  human_nature  diversity  historiography-18thC  social_theory  Social_Darwinism  Herder  Linnaeus  Locke  essentialism  essence  climate  stadial_theories  Romanticism  social_order  progress  atheism_panic  authority  class_conflict  bourgeoisie  liberalism  capitalism  equality  stratification  scientism  science_of_man  science-and-religion  positivism  social_sciences  France  Britain  British_Empire  Germany  Great_Powers  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Marx Myths & Legends - website
Series of serious essays, including on relations to other thinkers (e.g. Hegel) and how Marx was contested and distorted by both enemies and friends in 20thC -- We believe that what Marx had to say remains of considerable relevance to an understanding of problems we face today, but that a reading of Marx now must maintain a critical caution which does not merely reproduce received ideas- positive or negative- about Marx’s work. The distortion and questionable interpretation of Marx’s work is in many senses a direct result of his great success. ... Interpretation of Marx has thus been driven by a number of historical factors, and any attempts to gain, for example, a “scholarly” understanding have necessarily been secondary. ... To set against the distortions we cannot raise up a singular, uncontradictory Marx, abstracted from history and ultimately separable from everything that comes within “Marxism”, yet it remains that there is much in that received wisdom about Marx that is refutable, or at least rendered distinctly questionable, with a little attention to the textual and historical evidence.
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  political_economy  social_theory  Marx  Hegel  Hegelian  Hegelians-French  Marxist  historiography-19thC  capitalism  capital  labor  Industrial_Revolution  industry  technology  ideology  property  legal_system  bourgeoisie  working_class  elites  money  markets  website  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Todd Cronan, lead remarks& forum - Do We Need Adorno? | nonsite.org
Participants - Todd Cronan, Emory University, Michael W. Clune, Case Western Reserve University, Nicholas Brown, UIC, Jennifer Ashton, UIC, Chris Cutrone, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Marnin Young, Yeshiva University
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_history  political_economy  economic_theory  US_economy  Marx  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  classes  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  human_capital  neoliberalism  inequality  domination  Communist_Party  alienation  cultural_critique  Leftist  labor  leisure  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Tampio, review essay - Redefining Kant's Legacy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 34, No. 6 (Dec., 2006), pp. 807-813
Each of the reviewed books, in the aftermath of later 20thC rejection of Kantian categorical imperative, find elements of Kant’s thought worth salvaging. (1) Kant's Politics: Provisional Theory for an Uncertain World by Elisabeth Ellis. *--* (2) Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment by Katerina Deligiorgi. *--* (3) The Persistence of Subjectivity: On the Kantian Aftermath by Robert B. Pippin -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  Kant  Kant-ethics  Enlightenment-ongoing  political_philosophy  political_participation  subjectivity  bourgeoisie  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John Tosh - Gentlemanly Politeness and Manly Simplicity in Victorian England | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 455-472
Between the late eighteenth century and the mid-nineteenth century the notion of the 'polite gentleman' lost its political purchase. 'Manliness' became the identifying code of both the business class and the 'respectable' working class. The virtues of rugged individualism and personal integrity were emphasised at the expense of sociability and ease of manner. In the political sphere debates about who should be included in the franchise were permeated by the language of manliness, and the politicians with the greatest popular following were hailed as 'plain men' possessing a 'simple manliness'. -- lots of good stuff on contrast between 18thC and 19thC that helps explain part of hostility towards Bolingbroke as representing the unmanliness of the polite aristocrat both in his politics (easily accused of hypocrisy, a major Victorian sin), his sociability, (especially his relations with women) to say nothing of his religion, which wasn't serious enough,no struggle with faith or conscience -- just a fribble overall whose charisma counted against him as well as against those who were gulled by him -- Disraeli a throwback -- useful references -- didn't download
article  jstor  cultural_history  social_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  Victorian  political_culture  working_class  bourgeoisie  professions  independence  individualism  competition  masculinity  politeness  manners  Evangelical  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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