dunnettreader + belles-lettres   11

Gisèle Sapiro - Défense et illustration de « l'honnête homme » (2094) - Cairn.info
Les arguments du discours anti-sociologique des hommes de lettres, qui ont trouvé leur expression la plus élaborée dans le livre de Pierre Lasserre, La Doctrine officielle de l’Université, illustrent parfaitement la concurrence entre hommes de lettres et sociologues sur le terrain de la morale. En instituant une science des mœurs, la sociologie se place dans une position de stricte observation en dehors de tout jugement de valeur et de normativité. Cet objectivisme et le relativisme qui la conduit à comparer les cultures dites « primitives » à la civilisation occidentale heurtent la vision du monde normative et hiérarchisée de lettrés convaincus que leur culture classique fonde leur supériorité sociale et morale.
objectivity  morality-conventional  scientism  19thC  social_order  social_sciences  article  cultural_capital  intelligentsia  mission_civilatice  Durkheim  political_culture  comparative_anthropology  Fin-de-Siècle  intellectual_history  social_theory  cultural_history  authority  downloaded  France  hierarchy  primitivism  belles-lettres 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
STEPHEN ARATA - Henry James, "The Art of Fiction" (1884) | JSTOR: Victorian Review, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Spring 2009), pp. 53-56
Short but helpful positioning of Art of Fiction in late Victorian belles lettres, including the article by Walter Besant with same title to which James was in part responding to. Comments on shifts in James' appreciation of Matthew Arnold - disagreed with Arnold that criticism was most needed when literary cultural life in a slump - for James literary criticism was an integral part of an era of lively, creative culture and literature. -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  19thC  lit_crit  literary_theory  novels  fiction  culture  literature-and-morality  James_Henry  Arnold_Matthew  Victorian  English_lit  belles-lettres  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
F. R. Ankersmit - Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 143-161
Lead article in "Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- According to German theorists historicism was the result of a dynamization of the static world-view of the Enlightenment. According to contemporary Anglo-Saxon theorists historicism resulted from a de-rhetoricization of Enlightenment historical writing. It is argued that, contrary to appearances, these two views do not exclude but support each other. This can be explained if the account of (historical) change implicit in Enlightenment historical writing is compared to that suggested by historicism and, more specifically, by the historicist notion of the "historical idea." Aspects of the contemporary debate about the nature and the task of historical writing can be clarified from the perspective of the differences between Enlightenment and historicist historical writing. -- see response article by Iggers and Ankersmit's response -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Germany  historicism  philosophy_of_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  belles-lettres  rhetoric-writing  historical_change  prose  style-history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Chandler - Edgeworth and the Lunar Enlightenment (2011) | Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE - James Chandler. "Edgeworth and the Lunar Enlightenment." Eighteenth-Century Studies45.1 (2011): 87-104. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Maria Edgeworth was arguably the most important novelist writing in English during the early Regency period. Her narrative art was informed by her influential educational theories, and in its turn it decisively shaped the very different oeuvres of Jane Austen and Sir Walter Scott, whose successes in fiction would somewhat eclipse hers. If Edgeworth’s novels came to seem puzzling in their design, the reason may lie in the distinctive disciplinary context from which they emerged. For Edgeworth followed her highly accomplished and polymath father in engaging with the projects of the Lunar Society of Birmingham, which included diverse intellectuals such as James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, and Joseph Priestley. The Lunar commitment to improvement through experiment, I argue, not only set the terms for the agricultural, mechanical, and educational efforts carried out by Richard Edgeworth and his daughter on their Irish estate, it also helps to make sense of the novels and tales Maria wrote there, especially her remarkable analysis of contemporary fashionable life inBelinda (1801).
article  Project_MUSE  18thC  cultural_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  belles-lettres  English_lit  novels  Edgeworth  Lunar_Society  learned_societies  improvement  education  education-women  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paula Findlen: Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Findlen, Paula. “Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/33. IN "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- By the eighteenth century the Cimento was as a symbolic point of departure for the idea of founding an academy that would restore Italy’s greatness through the pursuit of modern knowledge..... as the great librarian, historian, and guardian of Italy’s intellectual heritage Ludovico Antonio Muratori (1672-1750) noted with disgust in 1704, in his day virtually every Italian city had “an academy, indeed two, three or sometimes even more”—but to what end? In his famous account of the Italian republic of letters, First Sketches of the Republic of Letters of Italy, written under the pseudonym of Lamindio Pritanio, Muratori described the decline of Italy’s academies since the era of the Cimento. .... [Queen Christina] was widely regarded as a great patron of science. Yet these activities had been eclipsed by the creation of the Accademia degli Arcadi, a literary academy founded in Rome in 1690 which claimed Queen Christina as its posthumous patron and rapidly established colonies throughout the Italian peninsula...... The success of Arcadia at the expense of other kinds of scholarly initiatives at the dawn of the eighteenth century was the focal point of Muratori’s condemnation of the current state of the Italian academies and his call for the emergence of a new kind of patron. Grillo Borromeo’s decision to create an academy in Palazzo Borromeo was an attempt to redress this imbalance while also highlighting the prominent role that learned women might play in this new vision of the republic of letters.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  academies  Royal_Society  Italy  Milan  Florence  Rome  patronage  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  Scientific_Revolution  natural_philosophy  poetry  belles-lettres  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein: Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Edelstein, Dan. “Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/27. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- also downloaded attachments (1) Edelstein-Appendix1_citation_index.xls (2) Edelstein-Appendix2_discarded_names.xls (3) Edelstein- Appendix3_Etat_de_Nature_comparison_with_Locke.pdf -- Humanism, in this interpretation, no longer appears in opposition to the Enlightenment, but can be seen to lie at the heart of the philosophical project to diffuse knowledge and “change the common way of thinking.” The classification, extraction, and compilation of texts and ideas had indeed been elevated to an art form, if not a science, by early-modern scholars; their techniques could now serve the philosophical good of disseminating “general Enlightenment [lumières générales].” This important role, however, remained a fairly invisible one, given that a collège education had made humanist practices almost second nature for Enlightenment scholars. In fact, they often did not even seem aware of their debt to the past: 
article  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  16thC  17thC  18thC  humanism  érudits  scholarship  reading  philosophes  Encyclopédie  Diderot  Voltaire  Montesquieu  Republic_of_Letters  ancient_philosophy  antiquity  belles-lettres  French_lit  historiography  Locke  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  academies  aesthetics  Ancients-and-Moderns  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  Anglo-Irish_constitution  antiquaries  antiquity  Arnold_Matthew  article  authority  barbarians  belles-lettres  biography-writing  books  British_Empire  British_history  British_politics  comedy  comparative_anthropology  cultural_capital  cultural_history  culture  Diderot  downloaded  Durkheim  Edgeworth  education  education-higher  education-women  EF-add  elite_culture  Encyclopédie  English_lit  Enlightenment  etexts  fiction  Fin-de-Siècle  Florence  France  French_Enlightenment  French_lit  Germany  Google_Books  Goths  Greek_lit  groups-social_capital  hierarchy  historical_change  historical_fiction  historicism  historiography  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-antiquity  history_of_science  humanism  imitation  improvement  intellectual_history  intelligentsia  Ireland  Italy  James_Henry  journalism  jstor  Latin_lit  learned_societies  liberalism  literary_history  literary_theory  literature-and-morality  lit_crit  Locke  Lunar_Society  Milan  mission_civilatice  Modernism  Montesquieu  morality-conventional  Morley  narrative  natural_philosophy  new_historicism  novels  objectivity  oral_culture  parties  patronage  periodization  philosophes  philosophy_of_history  poetics  poetry  political_culture  political_philosophy  popular_culture  postmodern  primitivism  print_culture  Project_MUSE  prose  public_opinion  publishing  reading  religious_lit  Renaissance  Republic_of_Letters  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  romances  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Rome  Royal_Society  scholarship  Scientific_Revolution  scientism  Scottish_Enlightenment  social_order  social_sciences  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  style  style-history  sublime  subscriptions  theater  tragedy  translation  vernacular  Victorian  Voltaire  website  women-intellectuals  érudits 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: