dunnettreader + authors   13

Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Electronic Literature as Cultural Heritage (Confessions of an Incunk) | Matthew G. Kirschenbaum - April 2013
This is the text of a talk I gave on April 5, 2013 on the plenary panel at the Electronic Literature Showcase at the Library of Congress, curated by Kathi Inman Berens and Dene Grigar. -- I come before you today, unapologetically, as an Incunk, that is one who has assumed archival and curatorial stewardship over the two electronic literature collections at my university (both, happily, from writers who are still among us, one of whom is even amongst us in this room today). In my remarks I want to candidly consider some of what is at stake in these transitions and transactions, as electronic literature passes from outsider practice to cultural heritage as sanctioned by its passage from private hands to an increasing number of major collecting institutions. [At U of Maryland] -- fascinating re different approaches to emulation, migrating, control of access to limited materials, limited locations etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
literary_history  authors  cultural_history  correspondence  private_papers  digital_humanities  libraries  archives  technology  software  computers  hardware  IP  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alessandra Villa - Le partage des ‘droits’ sur l’œuvre littéraire à la renaissance. Les cas d’Isabella d’Este | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 45-71
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.116. **--** la marquise s’avéra préférer, lorsqu’une œuvre lui était offerte, l’exclusivité de l’objet et le privilège de posséder une œuvre peu répandue et dont elle pouvait contrôler la diffusion ultérieure. Tout en répondant parfaitement à l’image d’une femme que l’historiographie dépeint véhémente, voire tyrannique, cette idée était très familière aux mécènes de la Renaissance et, à vrai dire, de tous les temps, du fait que la rareté est l’un des critères principaux pour estimer la valeur d’une quelconque collection, qu’elle soit d’œuvres d’art ou de livres. D’autre part, si les reproductions des œuvres d’art ne gardaient pas aux yeux des contemporains toute la valeur des originaux, les œuvres littéraires, ainsi que les œuves théâtrales et musicales, possédaient un haut degré de ‘volatilité’, pouvant être copiées à peu de frais et sans porter préjudice à leur valeur intrinsèque. Leur reproduction n’impliquait pas une perte d’aura. -- Pour protéger les trésors de leurs bibliothèques, les seigneurs se montraient jaloux et méfiants : ils prêtaient peu volontiers, et seulement à des amis fiables, auxquels ils demandaient cependant des garanties, parfois même en argent. Le prêt des œuvres était réglé par la loi du do ut des, et l’emprunteur était soumis au serment, implicite ou explicite, de ne pas trahir la confiance du prêteur en divulguant ultérieurement le manuscrit. Selon Luzio et Renier, on pourrait écrire une histoire de la littérature italienne de la période en étudiant les dédicaces offertes à Isabella. Vu la qualité et la quantité des œuvres et des auteurs intéressés par un tel recensement, cela paraît une affirmation bien fondée. Mais outre l’honneur, Isabella semble avoir réclamé un autre genre de prérogatives, plus matériel et à la fois plus indéterminé : le droit de partager avec l’auteur leur gestion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  15thC  16thC  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Italian_lit  Renaissance  court_culture  courtiers  elite_culture  patronage  patrons  authors  playwrights  publishing  publishing-piracy  IP  copyright  property_rights  dedications-author  economics_of_cultural_production  bibliophiles  manuscripts  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert D. Hume - The Economics of Culture in London, 1660–1740 JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 69, No. 4 (December 2006), pp. 487-533
Robert D. Hume asks four principal questions in this article: (1) Who were the consumers of elite culture, and what could and would they pay? (2) What could be earned by writers, actors, singers, musicians, painters? (3) Who actually profited from the sale of culture? (4) How did patronage affect the production of culture? A survey of surviving figures for income strata and the prices paid by buyers suggests that the consumers of elite culture belonged largely to the wealthiest two percent of the population. Analysis of incomes shows that trying to earn a living as a writer, actor, or musician was a tough proposition. Patronage turns out to be surprisingly important, but more in terms of jobs, sinecures, and subscriptions than from individual largesse. Exact equivalencies to modern buying power are impossible to calculate, but scholars need to realize, for example, that in 1709 fully two-thirds of the books advertised in the Term Catalogues cost two shillings or less: a five-shilling book was pricey.
article  jstor  cultural_history  social_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  elite_culture  court_culture  theater  publishing  actors  authors  patronage  patrons  prices  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Maria Popova - 19th-Century German Philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer Predicts the Economics of the Web and Modern Publishing | Brainpickings Jan 2014
Re essay on authors and journalism -- even in 19thC not drowning in information, importance of form over content, value of older works, presentism and passion for novelty even in 19thC -- from Essays of Schopenhauer: The Art of Literature
books  reviews  etexts  lit_crit  19thC  Schopenhauer  authors  readership 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Trevor Ross: Copyright and the Invention of Tradition (1992)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 1-27 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- limits on perpetual copyright of 1710 upheld in1774 -- creation of defined property rights simultaneously creates the public domain -- by 1774 a notion that English culture involved a tradition that belonged to everyone -- bibliography on 2ndry sources that have tracked the legal details and booksellers practices, cartel etc
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  canon  cultural_history  legal_history  18thC  1710s  laws  litigation  intellectual_property  publishing  consumers  reading  creativity  authors  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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