dunnettreader + authority   69

Roger Chartier's emeritus pages - Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - Collège de France
Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - links to his courses and seminars while he held the chair, and location for subsequent work especially the Débats d'histoire discussions - once a month starting in December 2015 - during the school year (i.e. through May) with announced intention to restart this school year. Joined for several by Patrick Boucheron who arrived (Dec 2015) as Chartier's regular appointment came to an end.
cultural_authority  Roman_Catholicism  Counter-Reformation  lit_crit  French_Enlightenment  religious_history  Europe-Early_Modern  podcast  intellectual_history  postmodern  cultural_capital  critical_theory  history_of_science  cultural_change  connected_history  historiography  theater  circulation-ideas  history_of_book  translation  microhistory  authority  interview  courses  classicism  Renaissance  website  literary_history  global_history  cultural_history  audio  Foucault  video  lecture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
RB Outhwaite - The Rise and Fall of the English Ecclesiastical Courts, 1500–1860 (2007) | Cambridge University Press
The first history of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in England that covers the period up to the removal of principal subjects inherited from the Middle Ages. Probate, marriage and divorce, tithes, defamation, and disciplinary prosecutions involving the laity are all covered. All disappeared from the church's courts during the mid-nineteenth century, and were taken over by the royal courts. The book traces the steps and reasons - large and small - by which this occurred.
Downloaded 1st 10 pgs Ch 1 via Air
1. The ecclesiastical courts: structures and procedures
2. The business of the courts, 1500–1640
3. Tithe causes
4. Wills and testamentary causes
5. Defamation
6. Matrimonial litigation and marriage licenses
7. Office causes
8. The roots of expansion and critical voices
9. Charting decline, 1640–1830
10. Explaining decline
11. The Bills of 1733–1734
12. Snips and repairs: small steps to reform, 1753–1813
13. Royal commissions and early fruits, 1815–1832
14. Reform frustrated
15. Reforms thick and fast, 1854–1860.
books  downloaded  legal_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Church_of_England  legal_system  church_courts  religion-established  family  marriage  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  inheritance  property  trusts  dispute_resolution  reform-social  reform-legal  morality-Christian  local_government  local_politics  discipline  punishment  authority  hierarchy  governing_class  governance-church  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Joanne Bailey - Unquiet Lives: Marriage and Marriage Breakdown in England, 1660–1800 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
Drawing upon vivid court records and newspaper advertisements, this study challenges traditional views of married life in 18thC England. It reveals husbands' and wives' expectations and experiences of marriage to expose the extent of co-dependency between spouses. The book, therefore, presents a new picture of power in marriage and the household. It also demonstrates how attitudes towards adultery and domestic violence evolved during this period, influenced by profound shifts in cultural attitudes about sexuality and violence.
- An unusually detailed model of married life in the eighteenth century, which stresses co-dependency between husband and wife
- Charts thinking towards violence and adultery in the eighteenth century, focusing as much on men's needs and dependence as on those of women
1. Introduction: assessing marriage
2. 'To have and to hold': analysing married life
3. 'For better, for worse': resolving marital difficulties
4. 'An honourable estate': marital roles in the household
5. 'With all my worldly goods I thee endow': spouses' contributions and possessions within marriage
6. 'Wilt thou obey him and serve him': the marital power balance
7. 'Forsaking all other': marital chastity
8. 'Till death us do part': life after a failed marriage
9. 'Mutual society, help and comfort': conclusion
downloaded intro via AIR
books  downloaded  17thC  18thC  British_history  social_theory  gender_history  cultural_history  sex  chastity  adultery  marriage  family  property_rights  women-legal_status  authority  patriarchy  gender  identity  masculinity  femininity  violence  judiciary  Church_of_England  inheritance  children  church_courts  reform-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Harro Hopfl - Jesuit Political Thought (2008) | Cambridge University Press
Harro Höpfl presents here a full-length study of the single most influential organized group of scholars and pamphleteers in early modern Europe (1540–1630), namely the Jesuits. He explores the academic and political controversies in which they were engaged in and their contribution to academic discourse around ideas of 'the state' and 'politics'. He pays particular attention to their actual teaching concerning doctrines for whose menacing practical implications Jesuits generally were vilified: notably tyrannicide, the papal power to depose rulers, the legitimacy of 'Machiavellian' policies in dealing with heretics and the justifiability of breaking faith with heretics. Höpfl further explores the paradox of the Jesuits' political activities being at once the subject of conspiratorial fantasies but at the same time being widely acknowledged as among the foremost intellects of their time, with their thought freely cited and appropriated. This is an important work of scholarship. -- Intro excerpt downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  Counter-Reformation  downloaded  resistance_theory  politico-theology  kindle-available  religious_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Absolutism  universalism  Erastianism  enlightened_absolutism  intellectual_history  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  Papacy  church_history  politics-and-religion  Church-and-State  Jesuits  books  authority  religion-established 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Gisèle Sapiro - Défense et illustration de « l'honnête homme » (2094) - Cairn.info
Les arguments du discours anti-sociologique des hommes de lettres, qui ont trouvé leur expression la plus élaborée dans le livre de Pierre Lasserre, La Doctrine officielle de l’Université, illustrent parfaitement la concurrence entre hommes de lettres et sociologues sur le terrain de la morale. En instituant une science des mœurs, la sociologie se place dans une position de stricte observation en dehors de tout jugement de valeur et de normativité. Cet objectivisme et le relativisme qui la conduit à comparer les cultures dites « primitives » à la civilisation occidentale heurtent la vision du monde normative et hiérarchisée de lettrés convaincus que leur culture classique fonde leur supériorité sociale et morale.
objectivity  morality-conventional  scientism  19thC  social_order  social_sciences  article  cultural_capital  intelligentsia  mission_civilatice  Durkheim  political_culture  comparative_anthropology  Fin-de-Siècle  intellectual_history  social_theory  cultural_history  authority  downloaded  France  hierarchy  primitivism  belles-lettres 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Norbert Lenoir, review - Catherine Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » ( 2011) | Books & ideas - July 2015
Reviewed : C. Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » [Democracy Without ‘Demos‘], PUF, 2011, 256 pages, 27 euros -- French version January 2012 -- translated by Michael C. Behrent -- Democracy is not the government of the people, by the people. Rather, it is a permanent process of conquering new rights. This is the argument of Catherine Colliot-Thélène’s book, which examines the tension, found throughout democracy’s history, between individual emancipation and political affiliation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
reviews  books  French_language  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_liberties  citizens  citizenship  authority  national_ID  identity-multiple  globalization  global_governance  political_culture  political_participation  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Where is the power? - Wojciech Przybylski, Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz A conversation with Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz - July 2015
Original in Polish -- Translation by Aleksandra Malecka
First published in Res Publica, Nowa 30 (2015) -- In Europe all political thought is imperialist, says Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz. This means that politics as we know it today incorporates the experience of imperial politics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, when the foundations of what we call "the political" were forged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
geopolitics  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  empires  state-building  nation-state  national_interest  EU  EU_governance  imperial-soft  Germany  Germany-Eurozone  Russia  Russian_foreign_policy  Poland  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  empire-and_business  globalization  sovereignty  hierarchy  authority  public_policy  policymaking  public_opinion  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Millon - The Ideology of Jury Autonomy in the Early Common Law :: SSRN - Nov 2000
Washington & Lee Public Law Research Paper No. 00-5 -- This article looks closely at the substantial discretion exercised by the premodern English jury. Through the sixteenth century, jurors enjoyed broad autonomy with respect to fact-finding. For much of the medieval period they came to court already knowledgeable about the facts of a case and rendered their verdicts on that basis. Even after they ceased to be self-informed and had to rely instead on evidence presented in court, jurors continued to exercise their fact-finding authority with substantial independence from judicial control and review. The premodern jury also had significant autonomy regarding what we would call questions of law, an aspect of jury discretion that has received little attention from historians. In this article I look closely at the evidence bearing on both facets of jury autonomy, including trial records, accounts of trial proceedings, and legislation relating to the jury. In addition, I attempt to shed some light on the ideological assumptions that justified the early common law's commitment to jury autonomy, a commitment that is hard to understand in light of the modern rule of law idea. -- PDF File: 44. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_history  British_history  medieval_history  16thC  common_law  trials  juries  evidence  epistemology-social  Europe-Early_Modern  legal_culture  legal_validity  legitimacy  civic_virtue  citizenship  local_government  public_goods  commonwealth  governance-participation  status  cities-governance  persona  judgment-independence  autonomy  authority  elites  clientelism  duties  duties-civic  community  rule_of_law  fairness  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Schauer - The Path-Dependence of Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 957 (2015)
My aim in this Article is to focus on the history of thinking about law in the context of 3 topics (..) to show that the continuous development of the theory of legal positivism, however useful it may have been or may still be, has possibly caused us to ignore other aspects of what was originally part of the positivist picture. (..)The first of these dimensions is the relationship between legal theory and legal reform. (..) that an account of the nature of law might be developed not simply as an aid to understanding or accurate description, but instead as a way of facilitating reform of law itself or reform of how a society understands the idea of law. Second, legal positivism, at the time of its late 19thC (or perhaps even earlier) origins, was focused on the importance of coercion, force, and sanctions as central components of law. But as with the creation of legal theories for the purpose of legal reform, this emphasis on the coercive side of law has also been banished to a kind of jurisprudential purgatory, for reasons and with consequences that deserve further examination. The third lost element of earlier versions of legal positivism is its focus on judicial decision making and the role of judges. Modern legal positivists, for whom 1961 is all too often the beginning of useful thought about the nature of law, do not, with few exceptions, consider theories of judicial decision making to be a necessary or even important part of the positivist perspective. But it was not always so. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  legal_reform  institutional_change  institutions  judiciary  judicial_review  law_enforcement  criminal_justice  punishment  coercion  authority  obligation  policymaking  political_change  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism-legal  positive_law  positivism  justice  Study_and_Uses  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alice Ristroph - Sovereignty and Subversion (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1029 (2015)
Hobbes’s account of law, like his account of punishment, does not fit well into our existing scholarly categories. (..). He was neither a legal positivist nor a natural law theorist, at least not as we usually use these labels. He adopted neither a retributive nor a consequentialist justification of punishment. Yet his account of human interaction, particularly with respect to law and punishment, captures actual experience better than the more familiar alternatives. Moreover, the space for subversion in Hobbes’s theory may make his account more normatively appealing than it has seemed to modern liberals. (...) 3 questions about Hobbesian theory: What is law? What is its relationship to punishment? And what are the implications of Hobbes’s theory for contemporary efforts to describe law or the relationship of law to punishment? The first (..) Hobbes’s legal theory is still so widely mischaracterized, sometimes even by Hobbes scholars, that it is worth returning to his claims. The second question has received much less attention, perhaps because a right to resist punishment seems so discordant with the authoritarian Hobbes we know, or think we know. And the third question has received still less attention, for contemporary jurisprudence scholarship rarely cites anyone who wrote before Jeremy Bentham and John Austin. I hope to show that, in many instances, Hobbes has been misread; even more importantly, I hope to persuade scholars of jurisprudence that what Hobbes actually said is worthy of their engagement. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  Hobbes  17thC  political_philosophy  social_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  sovereignty  authority  obligation  punishment  resistance  liberalism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark C. Murphy - A Commentary on Ristroph’s “Sovereignty and Subversion” | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1055 (2015)
She is correct in rejecting the assimilation of Hobbes’s legal theory to Austin’s, and in noting the strands of Hobbes’s view that disqualify him from counting as any sort of legal positivist. And I agree, on the whole, with her characterization of Hobbes’s account of justified punishment, and that this account has its attractions yet produces some puzzles which Hobbes does not fully resolve. My disagreements are with her second-order characterization of Hobbes’s legal theory. I want to discuss two related areas of disagreement. The first disagreement concerns whether we should assess Hobbes’s account of law in terms of the standards of general descriptive jurisprudence: Ristroph denies that it should be; I disagree. The second concerns whether we should take Hobbes’s treatment of the political as explanatorily prior to the legal to show that Hobbes was in some way apart from the natural law tradition in jurisprudence: Ristroph affirms this; I disagree. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  Hobbes  17thC  political_philosophy  social_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  sovereignty  authority  obligation  punishment  resistance  liberalism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron -Judicial Review and Judicial Supremacy (Nov 2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-57 -- This paper attempts to identify a particular constitutional evil -- namely, judicial supremacy -- and to distinguish the objection to judicial supremacy from the broader case that can be made against judicial review. Even if one supports judicial review, one ought to have misgivings about the prospect of judicial supremacy. The paper associates judicial supremacy with three distinct tendencies in constitutional politics: (1) the temptation of courts to develop and pursue a general program (of policy and principle of their own) rather than just to intervene on a piecemeal basis; (2) the tendency of the highest court to become not only supreme but sovereign, by taking on a position of something like broad sovereignty within the constitutional scheme (thus confirming Thomas Hobbes in his conviction that the rule of law cannot be applied at the highest level of political authority in a state because any attempt to apply it just replicates sovereignty at a higher level)); (3) the tendency of courts to portray themselves as entitled to "speak before all others" for those who made the constitution, to take on the mantle of pouvoir constituant and to amend or change the understanding of the constitution when that is deemed necessary. -- Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: constitutions, Hobbes, judicial review, judicial supremacy, judges, judiciary, popular constitutionalism, rule of law, Sieyes, sovereignty -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  government-forms  Hobbes  Sieyes  sovereignty  authority  democracy  accountability  constitutions  constitutionalism  judicial_review  judiciary  conflict  public_policy  public_opinion  change-social  political_change  policymaking  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Was Origen the Caitlyn Jenner of the Transabled? | The American Conservative - June 2015
I’m afraid I’m going to re-enter the fray. Rod Dreher has a piece today wondering whether the next step in our cultural development (or decline) will be the… Another superb piece by Millman illustrating how Dreher's hostility to changing cultural norms gets wrapped in a blanket condemnation of "modernity" (and liberalism, individualism, autonomy, and generally Enlightenment values) yet Dreher is committed to Enlightenment benefits of increased knowledge, and insists on liberalism's commitment to personal religious liberty. So it basically comes down to liberty for me but not for thee, with the Church authority for norm-setting both impervious to scientific and cultural change, and claiming an extension over those who don't recognize the Chyrch's authority. The example of Origen, whose spiritual commitment led to self-castration, and who wasn't condemned by the senior hierarchy (prior to the Church legislating on a range of norms dealing with the body and especially sexuality and gender, which was one reason Origen was never made a saint). Millman also has a lengthy passage from Tolstoy about a priest, sexual tension, spiritual demands and self-mutilation, with Tolstoy's final conclusion that this sort of psychological turmoil wasn’t the praiseworthy attitudes and action of a saint but self-absorbed cintra Christ's teaching. Tl; dr -- Dreher can't have it both ways (or in his case what seems like an ever-growing laundry list of contradictory ways). -- saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  sexuality  gender  gender-and-religion  norms  Early_Christian  theology  declinism  modernity  liberalism  Orthodox_Christianity  authority  individualism  autonomy  culture_wars  culture-American  cultural_change  cultural_authority  psychology  identity  biology  physiology  neuroscience  Tolstoy  religious_experience  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_liberties  bill_of_rights  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
R.I. Moore - The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Authority and Deviance in Western Europe 950-1250, 2nd ed (2007) | Wiley Online Library
The 10th to 13thCs in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a a classic in medieval history, Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, "A Persecuting Society". Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the "persecuting society" accordingly, addressing criticisms of the 1st ed. -- free access to pdfs of new preface, a final bibliographical essay & the bibliography & index -- downloaded all pdfs but index to Air
books  bibliography  medieval_history  religious_history  political_history  social_history  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  persecution  heterodoxy  heresy  Judaism  Inquisition  Papacy  religious_culture  civil_liberties  authority  deviance  norms  hierarchy  Crusades  power  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephanie Snow, review - Michael Brown, Performing Medicine: Medical Culture and Identity in Provincial England, c.1760-1850 (Manchester University Press, 2011) | Reviews in History
Dr Stephanie Snow, Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester -- Brown takes a cultural historical approach (..) the ways in which medical identity and culture were transformed over the period from the late 18thC importance of liberal learning and the values of gentility and politeness to the early 19thC focus on vocationally specific forms of knowledge and association. (..) Through a case study of the social and intellectual activities of medical practitioners in the city of York, (..) crucial shifts in the culture of medicine between the 1760s and the 1850s. York (..) a geographical midway point between two key medical metropolises – London and Edinburgh; it did not experience the transformations associated with the processes of industrialization; yet it was shaped by many of the specific characteristics of the period such as political factionalism, the urban renaissance movement and ideologies of socio-scientific progressivism. (..) the ways through which medical practitioners fashioned their identities through public displays of knowledges such as botany, natural history, poetry and literature. Improvements in the health of the population (..) were principally due to the civic improvements in York such as paving and new drains as well as inoculation and other medical advances. [In the later 1830s] successive enactments of medical identity and authority set the stage for a new compact between medicine and society in which medical practitioners were nationally cast as experts in medical science with a collective desire and duty to alleviate disease and suffering. The transformations (..) are underlined by the public’s acceptance of the Medical School’s authority, under the provisions of the Anatomy Act, to dissect the body of a local man who had drowned in the river Ouse in 1835. Only 3 years earlier, (..) popular resistance to such activities during the cholera epidemic was high indeed. (..)case for the relevance of this history to the present dilemmas and controversies over professionalism and medicine and rightly stresses the social and political contingency of medical ideas and values. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  medicine  professionalization  scientific_culture  public_health  politeness  gentility  networks-social  networks-information  authority  improvement  urbanization  education-training  education-professional  public_policy  public_opinion  status  self-fashioning  identity  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
The Irrelevance of Legitimacy by Xavier Marquez :: SSRN - Sept 2014
Xavier Marquez , Victoria University of Wellington - September 17, 2014 --  Both popular and academic explanations of the stability, performance, and breakdown of political order make heavy use of the concept of legitimacy. But prevalent understandings of the idea of legitimacy, while perhaps useful and appropriate ways of making sense of the political world in ordinary public discourse, cannot play the more rigorous explanatory roles with which they are tasked in the social sciences. To the extent that the concept of legitimacy appears to have some explanatory value, this is only because explanations of social and political order that appeal to legitimacy in fact conceal widely different (and often inconsistent) accounts of the mechanisms involved in the production of obedience to authority and submission to norms. I suggest in this paper that explanatory social science would be better off abandoning the coarse concept of legitimacy for more precise accounts of the operation of these mechanisms in particular contexts. -- Keywords: legitimacy, Max Weber, social explanation, norms, David Beetham - Posted: March 22, 2012 ; Last revised: Sept 25, 2014 -- downloaded to Dropbox
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  political_science  political_sociology  social_theory  government-forms  authority  legitimacy  public_opinion  causation-social  norms  mechanisms-social  Weber  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Talal Asad - Historical notes on the idea of secular criticism « The Immanent Frame - Jan 2008
I have tried to underline the very different understandings people have had of it in Western history, understandings that can’t be reduced to the simple distinction between secular criticism (freedom and reason) and religious criticism (intolerance and obscurantism). The practice of secular criticism is now a sign of the modern, of the modern subject’s relentless pursuit of truth and freedom, of his or her political agency. It has almost become a duty, closely connected to the right to free expression and communication. But every critical discourse has institutional conditions that define what it is, what it recognizes, what it aims at, what it is destroying – and why. Neither philosophical nor literary criticism can successfully claim to be the privileged site of reason. It matters whether the criticism/critique in question is conducted in the form of parody and satire, confession of sins, political auto-critique, professional criticism, or speech under analysis. One might say that if these are all possible instances of critique/criticism, then what we have here is a family concept for which it is not possible to provide a single theory because the practices that constitute them differ radically. And yet there is, perhaps, something distinctive after all about the historical concept of “critique” that Foucault wanted to identify, something other than the varieties of critical practice to which I have pointed: In some areas of our modern life, there is the insistent demand that reasons be given for almost everything. The relation to knowledge, to action, and to other persons, that results when this demand is taken as the foundation of all understanding, is perhaps what Foucault had in mind when he spoke of critique. “The critical attitude” is the essence of secular heroism. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
critique  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_method  Popper  Kant  Foucault  secularism  secular_humanism  concepts-change  Koselleck  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology-social  scientific_culture  political_culture  authority  genealogy-method  individualism  agency  Enlightenment-ongoing  Bayle  scepticism  Republic_of_Letters  disciplines  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
LLOYD BOWEN -- ROYALISM, PRINT, AND THE CLERGY IN BRITAIN, 1639–1640 AND 1642. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 297-319. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
LLOYD BOWEN - University of Cardiff -- Charles I and his clerical supporters are often said to have been wary of print and public discussion, only entering the public sphere reluctantly and to comparatively little effect during the political crisis of 1642. This article challenges such views by focusing on the neglected role of official forms of print such as proclamations, declarations, and state prayers and their promulgation in the nation's churches. It traces the ways in which the king utilized the network of parish clergy to broadcast his message and mobilize support during the Scottish crisis of 1639–40 and again in the ‘paper war’ of 1642. The article argues that traditional forms of printed address retained their potency and influence despite the proliferation of polemical pamphlets and newsbooks. The significance of these mobilizations is demonstrated by the profound disquiet they caused among the king's Covenanter and parliamentarian opponents as well as the ‘good effects’ they had in generating support for the royalist cause. -* I am most grateful to Mark Stoyle, Mark Kishlansky, John Walter, Jacqueline Eales, and the anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier drafts of this article. -- available for download
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Charles_I  propaganda  monarchy  Church_of_England  clergy  parish  politics-and-religion  political_culture  public_opinion  religious_culture  authority  political_order  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  prayers-state  religion-established  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review Essay: Legal Thought in Enlightenment's Wake by Jeffrey A. Pojanowski :: SSRN - 4 Jurisprudence, 2013, Forthcoming
Notre Dame Legal Studies Paper No. 12-80 -- This review essay considers Steven D. Smith’s most recent book, The Disenchantment of Secular Discourse. Rather than focusing on the book’s argument about the practices and pathologies of the public square, this essay uses Smith’s chapter on scientific thought as a platform for exploring connections between Disenchantment and Smith’s prior work in legal theory. The catalyst for these reflections is Scandinavian legal realism. Considering these elements together sheds light on both the limits and virtues of central ideas about legal obligation and authority in contemporary jurisprudence. Such perspective points to a broader argument that jurisprudential debates about methodology and concepts may be as much about how we read the universe as they are about how we understand law. -- Keywords: jurisprudence, legal theory, obligation, authority, conceptual analysis, legal positivism
books  reviews  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  obligation  secularism  secularization  legal_realism  authority  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  legal_culture  positivism-legal  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
JON GARTHOFF - LEGITIMACY IS NOT AUTHORITY | JSTOR: Law and Philosophy, Vol. 29, No. 6 (November 2010), pp. 669-694
The two leading traditions of theorizing about democratic legitimacy are liberalism and deliberative democracy. Liberals typically claim that legitimacy consists in the consent of the governed, while deliberative democrats typically claim that legitimacy consists in the soundness of political procedures. Despite this difference, both traditions see the need for legitimacy as arising from the coercive enforcement of law and regard legitimacy as necessary for law to have normative authority. While I endorse the broad aims of these two traditions, I believe they both misunderstand the nature of legitimacy. In this essay I argue that the legitimacy of a law is neither necessary nor sufficient for its normative authority, and I argue further that the need for legitimacy in law arises regardless of whether the law is coercively enforced. I thus articulate a new understanding of the legitimacy and authority of law. -- didn't download -- bibliography heavily classic modern and contemporary philosophers
article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  institutions  authority  legitimacy  legal_culture  legal_validity  liberalism  social_contract  consent  reasons  enforcement  deliberation-public  Habermas  democracy  norms  normativity  obligation  Enlightenment  Locke  Mill  Rawls  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"LEGITIMATION" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- This article identifies 3 conceptions of legitimation - pre-modern, modern, and post-secular - -- Pre-modern conceptions of legitimation consider governments and rulers legitimate if they are ordained by God or if the political system is ordered in accordance with the normative cosmic order. Contemporary proponents of the pre-modern conception range from those in the US who maintain that the government has been legitimated by the “Judeo-Christian tradition” to those in predominantly Muslim countries like Iran that have constitutional theocracies. -- the prevailing modern conception of legitimation in constitutional democracies stems from the “consent of the governed,” which includes 2 principles of legitimation - democracy (or popular sovereignty) and constitutionalism (or the rule of law). The critical challenges to these principles include the internal challenges of identity politics and religious fundamentalism and the external challenge of globalization. The dramatic return of religion and the surprising rise of political theology are two prominent developments supporting a shift to a post-secular conception of legitimation and a new post-secular social imaginary. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "LEGITIMATION" Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Ed. Michael T. Gibbons, Diana Coole, & Kennan Ferguson. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  legitimacy  authority  divine_right  divine_command  democracy  constitutionalism  consent  social_contract  rule_of_law  post-secular  modernity  secularization  secularism  constitutional_law  government-forms  accountability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott J. Shapiro - Authority (2000) :: SSRN
C 2000

Stanford/Yale Jr. Faculty Forum Research Paper 00-05; Cardozo Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 24 -- the so-called "paradox of authority" was first developed in the late 18th Century by the anarchist theorist William Godwin and later popularized by Robert Paul Wolff in the 1960's. Their aim was to demonstrate that legitimate authority is impossible. As they argued, the problem with all authorities is that they claim the right to demand obedience even when they are wrong. However, people should never act in ways they believe to be wrong. Hence, people should never recognize the right of authorities to demand their obedience. This paper discusses the many "solutions" that have been offered on authority's behalf. The responses fall roughly into two groups: those who believe that problems arise due to certain naive views about the nature of authority and rationality and that revision in our understanding is required, and those who maintain that the puzzle can be unraveled without any radical changes. --, the paper accepts that the paradox (or, as it is shown, paradoxes) of authority cannot be solved within standard theories of rationality and morality. Which revisions are necessary, it is claimed, depends on one's underlying theory of legitimacy.
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  authority  obligation  legitimacy  instrumentalist  autonomy  action-theory  rationality  decision_theory  deliberation-public  paradox  anarchy  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Constitutionalism: A Skeptical View (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-87 - May 1, 2012 -- This paper examines the ideology that goes by the name of "constitutionalism." The first part of the paper considers the significance of "written constitutions" The second part of the paper casts a skeptical eye at conceptions of constitutionalisim that emphasize "limited" government. Once "limited government" is contrasted carefully with "restrained government" (restraints upon specific actions by government) and with "controlled government" (e.g. insistence upon democratic control), we see that the association of constitutionalism with general limitations on the scope of government ought to make it a much more controversial ideal than the general anodyne acceptance of the term "constitutionalism" might lead us to expect. Finally, the anti-democratic implications of constitutionalism are explored. The paper argues that, by insisting on limited government, constitutionalism downplays the important role that constitutions have to perform in the modern world in establishing and securing specifically democratic authority. -- Keywords: authority, constitution, constitutionalism, constitutional law, democracy, judicial review, limited government, rights, written constitution
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  constitutionalism  government-forms  democracy  judicial_review  constitutional_law  authority  legitimacy  political_participation  rights-legal  natural_rights  limited_government  accountability  constitutions  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Legal Positivism and 'Explaining' Normativity and Authority (2006 last revised 2009) :: SSRN
American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Law, Vol. 5, No. 2, Spring 2006 -- Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 09-05 -- It has become increasingly common for legal positivist theorists to claim that the primary objective of legal theory in general, and legal positivism in particular, is "explaining normativity." The phrase "explaining normativity" can be understood either ambitiously or more modestly. The more modest meaning is an analytical exploration of what is meant by legal or moral obligation, or by the authority claims of legal officials. When the term is understood ambitiously - as meaning an explanation of how conventional and other empirical facts can give rise to moral obligations - as many legal positivist theorists seem to be using the phrase, the project is contrary to basic tenets of legal positivism, and has regularly led theorists to propose doubtful theories that ignore "is"/"ought" divisions. -- Keywords: legal positivism, analytical legal theory, natural law theory -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  analytical_philosophy  positivism-legal  natural_law  is-ought  normativity  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  obligation  authority  legitimacy  constructivism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Patriarcha, or the Natural Power of Kings - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha; of the Natural Power of Kings. By the Learned Sir Robert Filmer Baronet (London: Richard Chiswell, 1680). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/221> -- In the aftermath of the English Revolution which saw the execution of a king and the creation of a Commonwealth and the restoration of the monarchy, Filmer wrote a solid defense of the divine right of kings which in turn prompted John Locke to write a riposte – part 1 of the Two Treatises of Government. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  monarchy  Absolutism  hierarchy  social_order  family  authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  divine_right  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  English_Civil_War  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  political_press  Tories  High_Church  resistance_theory  Locke-1st_Treatise  Tyrrell  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Adams, Revolutionary Writings, ed. C. Bradley Thompson - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Revolutionary Writings of John Adams, Selected and with a Foreword by C. Bradley Thompson (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/592> -- This volume contains the principal shorter writings in which Adams addresses the prospect of revolution and the form of government proper to the new United States. There are pieces on the nature of the British Constitution and the meaning of rights, sovereignty, representation, and obligation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  Adams_John  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  US_constitution  American_colonies  US_politics  American_Revolution  citizenship  natural_rights  civil_liberties  sovereignty  representation  representative_institutions  obligation  authority  legitimacy  Early_Republic  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Cesare Bonesana di Beccaria, An Essay on Crimes and Punishments... With a Commentary by M. de Voltaire - Online Library of Liberty
Cesare Bonesana di Beccaria, An Essay on Crimes and Punishments. By the Marquis Beccaria of Milan. With a Commentary by M. de Voltaire. A New Edition Corrected. (Albany: W.C. Little & Co., 1872). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2193> -- An extremely influential Enlightenment treatise on legal reform in which Beccaria advocates the ending of torture and the death penalty. The book also contains a lengthy commentary by Voltaire which is an indication of high highly French enlightened thinkers regarded the work.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Beccaria  Voltaire  crime  criminal_justice  punishment  torture  capital_punishment  treason  heresy  tolerance  authority  church_courts  legal_history  legal_system  Absolutism  authoritarian  tyranny  reform-political  reform-legal  social_sciences  social_order  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks [1771], ed. Aaron Garrett - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks; or, An Inquiry into the Circumstances which give rise to Influence and Authority in the Different Members of Society, edited and with an Introduction by Aaron Garrett (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/287> -- The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks is one of the major products of the Scottish Enlightenment and a masterpiece of jurisprudence and social theory. Millar developed a progressive account of the nature of authority in society by analyzing changes in subsistence, agriculture, arts, and manufacture. The book is perhaps the most precise and compact development of the abiding themes of the liberal wing of the Scottish Enlightenment. Drawing on Smith’s four-stages theory of history and the natural law’s traditional division of domestic duties into those toward servants, children, and women, Millar provides a rich historical analysis of the ways in which progressive economic change transforms the nature of authority. In particular, he argues that, with the progress of arts and manufacture, authority tends to become less violent and concentrated, and ranks tend to diversify. Millar’s analysis of this historical progress is nuanced and sophisticated; for example, his discussion of servants is perhaps the best developed of the “economic” arguments against slavery. -- 1st edition 1771 - he published 2 more in his lifetime, the latest edition being more "scientific", e.g. removing some references that were less reliable, more speculative, or not in keeping with a more sober tone -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  stadial_theories  social_order  social_sciences  social_process  change-social  political_economy  art_history  literary_history  civilizing_process  civil_society  family  authority  hierarchy  commerce  industry  trade  progress  slavery  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations [1737] with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull trans., eds. Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder - Online Library of Liberty
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations, with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull. Translated from the Latin by George Turnbull, edited with an Introduction by Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2305> -- The natural law theory of Johann Gottlieb Heineccius was one of the most influential to emerge from the early German Enlightenment. Heineccius continued and, in important respects, modified the ideas of his predecessors, Samuel Pufendorf and Christian Thomasius. He developed distinctive views on central questions such as the freedom of the human will and the natural foundation of moral obligation, which also sharply distinguished him from his contemporary Christian Wolff. The Liberty Fund edition is based on the translation by the Scottish moral philosopher George Turnbull (1698–1748). It includes Turnbull’s extensive comments on Heineccius’s text, as well as his substantial Discourse upon the Nature and Origin of Moral and Civil Laws. These elements make the work into one of the most extraordinary encounters between Protestant natural law theory and neo-republican civic humanism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Germany  Heineccius  Pufendorf  Thomasius  Wolff  Turnbull_George  natural_law  international_law  legal_theory  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  obligation  free_will  state-of-nature  government-forms  authority  legitimacy  natural_rights  natural_religion  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law [c 1750, tran 1763], trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. Peter Korkman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law, trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. and with an Introduction by Peter Korkman (Indianpolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1717> -- The basis of this version of The Principles of Natural and Politic Law is Thomas Nugent’s 1763 English translation, which became a standard textbook at Cambridge and at many premier American colleges, including Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania. The first scholarly work on Burlamaqui was written by an American, M. Ray Forrest Harvey, who in 1937 argued that Burlamaqui was well known among America’s Founding Fathers and that his writings exerted considerable influence on the American constitutional system. In his introduction, Nugent said of Burlamaqui: “His singular beauty consists in the alliance he so carefully points out between ethics and jurisprudence, religion and politics, after the example of Plato and Tully, and the other illustrious masters of antiquity.”
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - The Stupidest Thing I Have Ever Read | Slacktavist June 2014
-- This is from Religion Dispatches, by Patricia Miller titled, “The Story Behind the Catholic Church’s Stunning Reversal on Contraception” -- Here’s Miller: "The [papal] commission voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the ban against artificial means of birth control be lifted. -- Unhappy with the direction of the commission, the Vatican packed the last commission meetings with 15. But even the bishops voted 9 to 3 (3 abstained) to change the teaching, -- Despite the commission’s years of work and theologically unassailable conclusion that the church’s teaching on birth control was neither infallible nor irreversible, Pope Paul VI stunned the world on July 29, 1968, when he reaffirmed the church’s ban on modern contraceptives in Humanae Vitae. -- The pope had deferred to a minority report prepared by 4 conservative theologian priests that said the church could not change its teaching on birth control because admitting the church had been wrong about the issue for centuries would raise questions about the moral authority of the pope, especially on matters of sexuality, and the belief that the Holy Spirit guided his pronouncements. “The Church cannot change her answer because this answer is true. … It is true because the Catholic Church, instituted by Christ … could not have so wrongly erred during all those centuries of its history,” they wrote. As one of the conservative theologians famously asked one of the female members of the commission, what would happen to “the millions we have sent to hell” for using contraception if the teaching were suddenly changed.
religious_history  church_history  Catholics  Papacy  papal_infallibility  20thC  sexuality  feminism  patriarchy  women-work  women-rights  family  authority  tradition  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. Prior, review - Bernard Capp. England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and Its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660 | H-Net Reviews May 2013
Capp’s new book adds significant depth and nuance to our view of this period, ... Broadly speaking, the reformers were motivated by godly zeal and the desire to establish a civic commonwealth that was animated by humanist values, such as civility and good order. In this sense, the aims of the reformers agreed with the social values of the nobility, magistrates, and city corporations... However, ..a spectrum, along which positions were defined by the relative proportion of godliness to civility. The book is divided into three parts. The first concentrates on the various loci of political power, ...legislative reform carried on by the interregnum parliaments, by the government and the church at the county and local levels, and in an excellent chapter by propaganda and the press. The second part consists of six detailed chapters that take up the puritan “reformation of manners.” The third part of the book looks in some detail at local contexts, illustrating that reform proceeded very much according to the whims and will of local magistrates. Reformers had to contend with a series of structural and practical obstacles. ?..interregnum politics was fragmented. Parliament never really recovered from Pride’s Purge ... In spite of the desire to limit religious expression, a fervent climate of sectarianism remained. The Cromwellian state was obliged to settle for ad hoc compromises on a range of issues. ?...surely all of this detail adds up to something larger. ?...goes some way toward challenging the view that one major effect of the civil war was that the “state” emerged in its modern form. That is, politics transcended confessionalism and embraced legal values, secularism, and the rigid control of religion by the state. By contrast, Capp’s work suggests that religious dispute continued to destabilize politics at all levels, and that the state, if it existed at all, was obliged to defer to local custom.
books  reviews  historiography  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  sectarianism  state-building  nation-state  local_government  local_politics  reformation_of_manners  authority  authoritarian  church_history  commonwealth  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. A. Prior - Ecclesiology and Political Thought in England, 1580-c. 1630 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 2005), pp. 855-884
This article examines the ways in which debates on ecclesiology in the Church of England served as a venue for the examination of political precept. It argues in particular that polemical sources - whether sermons, pamphlets, or longer works - reveal that discussion of conformity, the nature of the church, and its doctrine and discipline led to a broader examination of law, sovereignty, parliament, and the political costs of religious discord. Underlying the dispute was a fundamental tension over civil and sacred authority, and the relationship between politics - the realm of human custom and history - and doctrine - the realm of the divine and immemorial. The article offers a number of revisions to current discussions of the history of political thought, while pointing to the importance of religious discourse for our understanding of the political tensions that existed in the years prior to the English civil war. -- extensive bibliography across political and religious history and political thought, theology and ecclesiology -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_lit  ecclesiology  Laudian  Calvinist  Puritans  godly_persons  theocracy  Erastianism  political_philosophy  political_press  political_culture  politics-and-religion  divine_right  monarchy  commonwealth  authority  legitimacy  sovereignty  Parliament  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's 2009 Voltaire lecture on 'The Guilt of Science?: Race, Science and Darwinism'
By the end of the eighteenth century, then, scientists had constructed a taxonomy of nature into which humans could be fitted and out of which emerged the categories of race. This seems to lend credibility to the view that it is modernity itself, and in particular the Enlightenment, that give rise both to the idea of race and to the practice of racism. ‘Eighteenth century Europe was the cradle of racism’, the historian George Mosse, argues because ‘racism has its foundations’ in the Enlightenment ‘preoccupation with a rational universe, nature and aesthetics.’ To see why this is not the case, we need to look more closely at how Enlightenment thinkers viewed the concept of human differences. -- If any event could demonstrate the folly of giving into unreason, it is surely Nazism and the Holocaust. Yet now it is regarded as an expression of too much reason.There is no intrinsic link between the idea of race and a rational or scientific view of the world. On the contrary: what made ideas of race plausible were the growth of political sentiments hostile to both the rationalism and the humanism of the Enlightenment.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  racialism  species  biology  evolutionary_biology  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  reason  Nazis  Holocaust  imperialism  slavery  civilizing_process  human_nature  diversity  historiography-18thC  social_theory  Social_Darwinism  Herder  Linnaeus  Locke  essentialism  essence  climate  stadial_theories  Romanticism  social_order  progress  atheism_panic  authority  class_conflict  bourgeoisie  liberalism  capitalism  equality  stratification  scientism  science_of_man  science-and-religion  positivism  social_sciences  France  Britain  British_Empire  Germany  Great_Powers  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop - CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM | Pandaemonium Jan 2014
Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop -- ‘The characteristic of historical writing in recent centuries’, Siedentop observes, ‘is an inclination to minimize the moral and intellectual distance between the modern and the ancient world, while at the same time maximizing the moral and intellectual distance between modern Europe and the middle ages.’ I am not sure that it makes much sense to talk about a ‘characteristic of historical writing’ that stretches over ‘centuries’. This is particularly so given that one the characteristics of recent historiography has been the opposite: the tendency to blur the distinction between the Middle Ages and modernity. Inventing the Individual is very much part of this revisionist trend. The trouble is, in revising the previous approach Siedentop now makes the ancient world too alien and modernity not distinctive enough. -- at least it's a counter to the mournful Thomist condemnation of liberal individualism by MacIntyre, Taylor et al.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  political_philosophy  Christianity  liberalism  equality  free_will  original_sin  hierarchy  authority  individualism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Erin Taylor, review - David Owens, Shaping the Normative Landscape // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
Moral obligations arising from socially-structured transactions (like promising or consent) or involvements (like friendship) are notoriously difficult to theorize. Are such obligations explained by the goodness of the social practices that generate them? Or do they merely track the distinctive ways in which such social practices, once in place, make it possible to harm one another? On the one hand, social institutions like promising do seem desirable (and perhaps even morally necessary). The existence of that institution enables us to rely on others when we otherwise could not, and it thereby provides a foundation for social coordination. On the other hand, the wrong of breaking a promise is not primarily (if at all) a matter of undermining a useful social convention or free riding on the efforts of others who keep the institution alive. A broken promise wrongs the promisee in particular. Theories of the normativity of consent and associative obligations to kith and kin can be similarly divided. The intuitive appeal of both approaches has left many theorists at something of an impasse (or else just talking past each other). Shaping the Normative Landscape does two important things. First, it shows how these two general approaches can be reconciled. Second, it shows that some intractable difficulties across a wide range of normative phenomena have both an underlying unity and elegant solution. More importantly, the solution itself is intuitively appealing.
books  reviews  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  normativity  obligation  authority  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristen Irwin, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, The Mighty and the Almighty: An Essay in Political Theology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The Mighty and the Almighty takes on the task of theorizing a political theology for the Christian. [T]his book originated in his 1998 Stone Lectures at Princeton... [and] retains both the advantages and the disadvantages of its original lecture format: astonishingly clear and accessible, but a relatively light sketch ...Despite the specifically Christian orientation of his project, Wolterstorff asks for the attention of the nonreligious: "In a participatory democracy such as ours, it's important that we each be open with and open to our fellow citizens concerning the deep sources of how we think about political issues". -- Though political theology is not nearly so popular as in the days of Augustine or Calvin -- two of Wolterstorff's foils -- Wolterstorff argues that it's overdue for careful contemporary consideration.-- a substantive account of the relationship between political authority and divine authority. -- The most innovative part of the book is Wolterstorff's use of the above distinction to offer a rereading of Romans 13... Rather than counseling universal submission to civil authorities, Wolterstorff argues, Paul is counseling submission to civil authorities insofar as they are executing "the God-assigned task of government to curb injustice. . . . to protect the rights of the public". Government clearly has the positional authority to issue whatever directives it deems appropriate to its citizens, but insofar as its directives violate justice or the rights of the public, government forfeits its performance-authority. The corollary is that "the directives that the government issues to the public for the purpose of curbing injustice are binding". -- In other words, the political authority of the state as the institution responsible for "protecting members of the public from being wronged by their fellows" can be derived both from natural rights, and from divine authority.
books  reviews  kindle-available  political_philosophy  political-theology  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  authority  obligation  natural_rights  Early_Christian  Paul  Augustine  Calvinist  resistance_theory  passive_obedience  justice  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexandre Kojeve, The Notion of Authority (trans Hager Weslati) | Kindle Store Amazon.com:
Alexandre Kojève has been an often subterranean influence on twentieth century thought. With his profound interpretation of Hegel he became a key reference for such varied thinkers as Jean-Paul Sartre, André Breton, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Leo Strauss. He returned to prominence after the collapse of the Soviet Union, as the surprise inspiration for Francis Fukuyama's notorious thesis in The End of History.

In The Notion of Authority, written in the 1940s in Nazi-occupied France, he uncovers the conceptual premises of four primary models of authority and examines the practical application of their derivative variations from the Enlightenment to Vichy France. This foundational text, here translated into English for the first time, is the missing piece in any discussion of sovereignty and political authority, ready to take its place alongside the work of Weber, Arendt, Schmitt, Agamben or Dumézil. The Notion of Authority is a short and sophisticated introduction to Kojève's philosophy of right, while in the context of his biography its significance resides in the fact it captures his puzzling intellectual interests at a time when he retired from the profession of philosophy and was about to become one of the pioneers of the Common Market and the idea of the European Union.
books  kindle-available  20thC  intellectual_history  social_theory  political_philosophy  sovereignty  authority  Hegelians-French  Hegelian  philosophy_of_history  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Allen Buchanan - Political Legitimacy and Democracy | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 112, No. 4 (July 2002), pp. 689-719
No abstract, excerpt from introduction -- The term ‘political legitimacy’ is unfortunately ambiguous. One serious source of confusion is the failure to distinguish clearly between political legitimacy and political authority and to conflate political authority with authoritativeness. I will distinguish between (1) political legitimacy, (2) political authority, and (3) authoritativeness. I will also articulate two importantly different variants of the notion of political authority. Having drawn these distinctions, I will argue first that political legitimacy, rather than political authority, is the more central notion for a theory of the morality of political power. My second main conclusion will be that where democratic authorization of the exercise of political power is possible, only a democratic government can be legitimate.

Another ambiguity is also a source of confusion. Sometimes it is unclear whether ‘legitimacy’ is being used in a descriptive or a normative sense. In this article I am concerned exclusively with legitimacy in the normative sense, not with the conditions under which an entity is believed to be legitimate. However, a normative account of legitimacy is essential for a descriptive account. Unless one distinguishes carefully between political legitimacy, political authority, and authoritativeness, one will not be clear about what beliefs in legitimacy are beliefs about. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  authority  legitimacy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue - Civic Republicanism and Political Philosophy | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 84, No. 1, JANUARY 2001
(1) Cosmopolitan Republicanism: Citizenship, Freedom and Global Political Authority (pp. 3-21) James Bohman. *--* (2) On the Modern Relevance of Old Republicanism (pp. 22-44) Alain Boyer. *--* (3) Republican Liberty and Resilience (pp. 45-59)
Geoffrey Brennan and Alan Hamlin. *--* (4) Self-government: The Master Trope of Republican Liberty (pp. 60-76) Vivienne Brown. *--* (5) Pettit's Republic (pp. 77-97) John Ferejohn. *--* (6) Domination: A Preliminary Analysis (pp. 98-112)
Francis N. Lovett. *--* (7) Prospects for a Contemporary Republicanism (pp. 113-130) Gurpreet Rattan
journal  article  jstor  political_philosophy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  neo-republicanism  domination  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  cosmopolitanism  citizens  political_participation  governance  global_governance  sovereignty  authority  Pettit  Rawls 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony J. La Vopa - The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer" from Luther to Kant | JSTOR - Huntington Library Quarterly (1997)
The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer": On the Career of a German Epithet from Luther to Kant -- Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, Enthusiasm and Enlightenment in Europe, 1650-1850 (1997), pp. 85-115 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  religious_culture  religious_belief  enthusiasm  Pietist  Reformation  politics-and-religion  sectarianism  Luther  Kant  imagination  rationality  rational_religion  clergy  authority  self  self-knowledge  self-control  public_sphere  public_disorder  status  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Laura Brace, The Idea of Property in Seventeenth-Century England: Tithes and the Individual | JSTOR: Church History, Vol. 68, No. 3 (Sep., 1999), pp. 719-721
Against a Macpherson notion of possessive individualism that's concerned with economics, Brace puts property in a web of political, moral and religious relations and conflicting values. More an essay that presents the issues than provides analysis, but an important period in development of sectarian and ideological conflict that doesn't map neatly on our contemporary categories.
books  reviews  17thC  British_politics  church_history  social_order  property  political_culture  religious_culture  authority  moral_economy  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy Stanton - Authority and Freedom in the Interpretation of Locke's Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 6-30
This essay argues that many modern discussions of Locke's political theory are unconsciously shaped by an imaginative picture of the world inherited from the past, on which authority and freedom are fundamentally antipathetic. The consequences of this picture may be seen in the distinction made customarily in Locke studies between the 'authoritarian' Locke of Two Tracts on Government, for whom authority descends from God, and the later, 'liberal,' Locke, for whom authority arises from the will and agreement of individuals, and felt in the emphases placed on consent and resistance in most interpretations of Lockean political thought. The essay examines the composition and contours of this picture and, by holding up a mirror to contemporary Locke scholarship, draws attention to some of the ways in which it unwittingly distorts Locke's thinking. -- paywall Sage -- something similar in terms of binaries and ignoring different audiences in contemporary reading of others of the period including Bolingbroke
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Locke  tolerance  liberty  social_contract  majoritarian  authority  Bolingbroke 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tracy B. Strong - How to Write Scripture: Words, Authority, and Politics in Thomas Hobbes | JSTOR: Critical Inquiry, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 128-159
See re Pettit and Skinner treatment of Hobbes, rhetoric and "constructivist" approach to social and political reality, sovereignty, authority erc -- downloaded pdf to Note -- followed up with comment be Victoria Silver and response
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_belief  Biblical_authority  rhetoric-political  hermeneutics  authority  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political-theology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - Delicate Discriminations: Thomas Hobbes's Science of Politics | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Oct., 2003), pp. 91-114
In the following, I argue that the Cold War image of Hobbes that presents him as a proponent of a state-centered conception of political power is misguided: it overlooks the aesthetic dimensions of 'representation' (a term that Hobbes infamously introduces in Leviathan, Chapter XVI) that, for someone writing in the seventeenth century, could not be distinguished from an account of 'political representation.' By focusing on Hobbes's scientific experiments in optics (within the Mersenne Circle) and the trompe-l'oeil artistic heritage whence these experiments derive, I show how Hobbes could not have been the kind of nominalist many historians of political thought make him out to be. Furthermore, Hobbes's persistent use of the theatre metaphor exemplifies a twinned aesthetic and political aspect of representation suggesting that citizens do not stop 'representing' once they consent to a sovereign. Rather, as the frontispiece Hobbes designed for Leviathan suggests, the sovereign is perpetually visible and hence subject to the spectator's ongoing discrimination and evaluation. In this regard, the sovereign is as much a subject of the citizen's opinion as she is a centripetal force guaranteeing stability; and, as an object of aesthetico-political evaluation, the sovereign occasions the perpetual production and circulation of opinions rather than merely unifying individual wills into a coherent and stable whole. -- a useful point re Hobbes needing to account for change, though not sure where "nominalism" comes in, but this doesn't contradict a state centric notion of power
jstor  article  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  optics  representation  representative_institutions  political_spectacle  public_opinion  sovereignty  authority 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 18]: ALISDAIR MACINTYRE, ENLIGHTENMENT AND TRADITION | Pandaemonium August 2012
Abelard’s real renown was as the most brilliant philosopher and theologian of his age. His work was, however, highly controversial because it challenged orthodox opinion, particularly about the Trinity, which Abelard tried to derive through reason. Twice he was condemned for heresy, and twice he meekly accepted his condemnation. MacIntyre approves of both the condemnation and of Abelard’s submission to authority. Abelard and his principal accuser, the Cistercian abbot Bernard of Clairvaux, both agreed, MacIntyre suggests, ‘that the integrity of the life of enquiry requires such interventions by authority’. Abelard, like all heretics, had been driven by ‘pride of will’. Heresy, MacIntyre writes, ‘is always a sign of pride in choosing to elevate one’s own judgment above that of genuine authority’. What defines a tradition, and hence moral truth, is not just reason or dialogue or debate but ‘genuine authority’. The ‘open-endedness’ of MacIntyre’s traditions is clearly strictly circumscribed.

It was precisely the claim that truth could be defined by authority that philosophers began to challenge from the sixteenth century on, and that came to define the Enlightenment, a challenge without which, as Jonathan Israel observes, modern ideas of ‘universality, equality and democracy’ could not have emerged. In defending the authority of premodern traditions against the Enlightenment idea of autonomy, MacIntyre may be taking a stance against the subjectivity of moral claims that he so despises. But the question he never properly addresses is how those modern moral ideas with which he has great sympathy would ever have evolved at all had the authority of those premodern traditions not been challenged in the first place.
books  bookshelf  moral_philosophy  Catholics  Papacy  Aquinas  authority  tradition  Burke  Enlightenment  liberalism  secularism  virtue_ethics  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: Two Concepts of Trust (2009)
JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 71, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 492-505 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Debates around political trust, notwithstanding ostensible disagreements, have converged on a conceptualization that is more psychological and economic than political. By contrast, classic debates in the history of political thought featured an agency-centered approach revolving around two concepts of trust, the discretionary and the accountable. Exploring the dynamic tension between discretion and accountability and restoring the latter to its historic significance for democratic theory would remedy some defects of the recent literature on trust. In particular, some rational-choice studies, though bearing important criticisms of alternative accounts of trust, have settled on vague and potentially selfdefeating prescriptions for psychologically distrusting and institutionally disempowering government.
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_culture  trust  institutions  fiduciary  authority  rational_choice  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Very Order of Things: Rousseau's Tutorial Republicanism (2005)
JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 235-261 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Rousseau's political theory has seemed to many to contemplate the radical transformation of human character through invasive governmental practices. But a classical republican reading of his general concern with moeurs and his developed conception of statecraft shows why he called for regulating or redirecting psychic dispositions, not destroying and then reconstructing them. Intimately related to this theme of moral economy are Rousseau's ideas on liberty and authority, which evince a deep-seated, complex Platonism. Far from displacing the modern categories of natural law, however, Rousseau's classical republicanism was meant to supply critical force for their revision. Thus the more instructive antinomy for students of Rousseau's politics is not Plato and Hobbes but rather Plato and Machiavelli, for the outstanding interpretive dilemma concerns the precise nature of republican authority.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  France  Rousseau  Plato  Hobbes  Machiavelli  republicanism  liberty  authority  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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