dunnettreader + augustine + kindle-available   5

Samuel Moyn review of Larry Siedentop's Invention of the Individual" - Did Christianity Create Liberalism? | Boston Review
Very interesting re the (19thC) "French" approach to liberalism -- historicist stressing process, contingency. Contrast with Anglo-Saxon social contract that takes the individual as its (unexamined) premiss, as does economic theory based on satisfying individual preferences etc. LS wrote an important article on the French approach. So Moyn sees LS as working to update and revise Guizot. Problem is LS (and all those claiming Christianity the basis of individual "natural rights") can't explain how the next world focus of Jesus and Paul became a this-world focus with the role of the individual as foundational. Moyn critiques the steps LS takes starting with the moral revolution of Augustine and working through the Middle Ages.
theology  natural_law  France  Instapaper  liberty  medieval_history  political_philosophy  Augustine  Guizot  liberalism  social_theory  historiography-19thC  individualism  medieval_philosophy  reviews  EF-add  social_contract  Constant  books  natural_rights  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  Augustinian  kindle-available  19thC  from instapaper
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Garry Wills - Augustine's "Confessions" - The “great sinner” myth « The Immanent Frame - March 21 2011
Excerpted from Augustine’s Confessions: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- popular version of Augustine as a sex hound, and that he had an obsession with chastity that had pernicious effects on readers through the centuries doesn't match a review of his writings on sin, etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  original_sin  depravity  Biblical_exegesis  theology  Catholic-doctrine  Christianity  sexuality  chastity  celibacy  sex-religious_attitudes  guilt  spirituality  prayers  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristen Irwin, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, The Mighty and the Almighty: An Essay in Political Theology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The Mighty and the Almighty takes on the task of theorizing a political theology for the Christian. [T]his book originated in his 1998 Stone Lectures at Princeton... [and] retains both the advantages and the disadvantages of its original lecture format: astonishingly clear and accessible, but a relatively light sketch ...Despite the specifically Christian orientation of his project, Wolterstorff asks for the attention of the nonreligious: "In a participatory democracy such as ours, it's important that we each be open with and open to our fellow citizens concerning the deep sources of how we think about political issues". -- Though political theology is not nearly so popular as in the days of Augustine or Calvin -- two of Wolterstorff's foils -- Wolterstorff argues that it's overdue for careful contemporary consideration.-- a substantive account of the relationship between political authority and divine authority. -- The most innovative part of the book is Wolterstorff's use of the above distinction to offer a rereading of Romans 13... Rather than counseling universal submission to civil authorities, Wolterstorff argues, Paul is counseling submission to civil authorities insofar as they are executing "the God-assigned task of government to curb injustice. . . . to protect the rights of the public". Government clearly has the positional authority to issue whatever directives it deems appropriate to its citizens, but insofar as its directives violate justice or the rights of the public, government forfeits its performance-authority. The corollary is that "the directives that the government issues to the public for the purpose of curbing injustice are binding". -- In other words, the political authority of the state as the institution responsible for "protecting members of the public from being wronged by their fellows" can be derived both from natural rights, and from divine authority.
books  reviews  kindle-available  political_philosophy  political-theology  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  authority  obligation  natural_rights  Early_Christian  Paul  Augustine  Calvinist  resistance_theory  passive_obedience  justice  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader

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