dunnettreader + augustine + commerce-doux   1

A. M. C. Waterman - Economics as Theology: Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations | JSTOR: Southern Economic Journal, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Apr., 2002), pp. 907-921
Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations may be read as a work of natural theology similar in general style to Newton's Principia. Smith's ambiguous use of the word "nature" and its cognates implies an intended distinction between a positive sense in which "natural" means "necessary" and a normative sense in which "natural" means "right." The "interest" by which humans are motivated is "natural" in the first sense, but it may not bring about social outcomes that are "natural" in the second sense. It will do so only if the social institutions within which agents seek their own "interest" are well formed. Smith provides a large-scale, quasi-historical account of the way in which well-formed institutions gradually develop as unintended consequences of private "interest." In so doing, he provides a theodicy of economic life that is cognate with St. Augustine's theodicy of the state as remedium peccatorum. -- interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  political_economy  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  Smith  theodicy  institutions  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_history  stadial_theories  self-interest  Augustine  natural_religion  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  commerce-doux  common_good  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: