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Special Issue - Michael Oakeshott | Cosmos + Taxis, Vol 1, Issue 3, 2014
Editorial Note - Gene Callahan and Leslie Marsh *-* (1) The Critique of Rationalism and the Defense of Individuality: Oakeshott and Hayek - Chor-Yung Cheung *-* (2) Jane Jacobs’ Critique of Rationalism in Urban Planning - Gene Callahan and Sanford Ikeda *-* (3) Oakeshott on Modernity and the Crisis of Political Legitimacy in Contemporary Western Liberal Democracy - Noël O’sullivan. &-* (4) Oakeshott and the Complex Ecology of the Moral Life - Kevin Williams. *-* (5) Homo Ludens and Civil Association: The Sublime Nature of Michael Oakeshott’s Civil Condition - Thomas J. Cheeseman *-* (6) The Instrumental Idiom in American Politics: The ‘City on the Hill’ as a Spontaneous Order - Corey Abel *-* (7) Dogmatomachy: Ideological Warfare - David D. Corey. *-* Oakeshott on the Rule of Law: A Defense - Stephen Turner -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  Academia.edu  article  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  political_culture  legitimacy  democracy  liberalism  Oakeshott  Jacobs_Jane  emergence  social_order  rationalist  modernity  Hayek  rule_of_law  Weber  fact-value  civil_society  associations  individualism  ideology  polarization  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom - Feb 2015 - Oxford University Press
Intermediate groups-- voluntary associations, churches, ethnocultural groups, universities, and more--can both protect threaten individual liberty. The same is true for centralized state action against such groups. Levy argues that, both normatively and historically, liberal political thought rests on a deep tension between a rationalist suspicion of intermediate and local group power, and a pluralism favorable toward intermediate group life, and preserving the bulk of its suspicion for the centralizing state. He studies this tension using tools from the history of political thought, normative political philosophy, law, and social theory. (..) retells the history of liberal thought and practice (..)from the birth of intermediacy in the High Middle Ages to the British Pluralists of the 20thC. (..) restores centrality to (..) ancient constitutionalism and to Montesquieu, (..) social contract theory's contributions to the development of liberal thought have been mistaken for the whole tradition. It discusses the real threats to freedom posed both by local group life and by state centralization, the ways in which those threats aggravate each other.(..) the elements of liberal thought concerned with the threats from each cannot necessarily be combined into a single satisfactory theory of freedom. (..) it must be lived with, not overcome. -- 3 parts and an epilogue Against Synthesis -history in Part 2 -- 4. Antecedents and Foundations -- 5. The Ancient Constitution, the Social Contract, and the Modern State -- 6. Montesquieu and Voltaire, Philosophes and Parlements -- 7. The Age of Revolutions -- 8. Centralization in a Democratic Age: Tocqueville and Mill -- 9. From Liberal Constitutionalism to Pluralism -- only in hardback so far
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may 2015 by dunnettreader

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