dunnettreader + article + imagination   14

Petersen
How do modern individuals form a sense of the vast societies in which they live? Social cognition has evolved to make sense of small, intimate social groups; but in complex mass societies, comparable vivid social cues are scarcer. Extant research on political attitudes and behavior has emphasized media and interpersonal networks as key sources of cues. Extending a classical argument, we provide evidence for the importance of an alternative and internal source: imagination. With a focus on social welfare, we collected survey data from two very different democracies; the United States and Denmark, and conducted several studies using explicit, implicit, and behavioral measures. By analyzing the effects of individual differences in imagination, we demonstrate that political cognition relies on vivid, mental simulations that engage evolved social and emotional decision-making mechanisms. It is in the mind's eye that vividness and engagement are added to people's sense of mass politics. - didn't download
political_spectacle  moral_psychology  jstor  images-political  imagined_communities  political_science  article  imagination  symbols-political  political_culture  social_psychology  mass_culture  discourse-political_theory  comparative_politics  politics-and-aesthetics  political_sociology  bibliography  political_press 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Spencer J. Pack, Eric Schliesser - Smith's Humean Criticism of Hume's Account of the Origin of Justice (2006) | Project MUSE
From: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Volume 44, Number 1, January 2006 pp. 47-63 | 10.1353/hph.2006.0004 *--* It is argued that Adam Smith criticizes David Hume's account of the origin of and continuing adherence to the rule of law for being not sufficiently Humean. ["Humean" is used for his tendency to use proto-evolutionary explanations of social phenomena in terms of psychological and material factors acting on individuals rather than rationalistic explanations] Hume explained that adherence to the rule of law originated in the self-interest to restrain self-interest. [Treatise 3.2.2,13-14, 316] [Smith says Hume's account is "too refined - TMS II, ii.3.5 ] According to Smith, Hume does not pay enough attention to the "unsocial" passion of resentment and the passion of admiration, which have their source in the imagination. Smith's offers a more naturalistic and evolutionary account [more Humean than Hume] of the psychological pre-conditions of the establishment and morality of justice. Yet, Smith's account also makes room for a thin conception of Lockean natural right to property, while rejecting the contractualist and rationalistic elements in Locke. It emerges that Smith severs the intimate connection that Hobbes and Hume made between justice and property. - paywall
article  paywall  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  Smith  Hume  justice  passions  imagination  resentment  property  property_rights  self-interest  Hobbes  self-protection  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Anthony J. La Vopa - The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer" from Luther to Kant | JSTOR - Huntington Library Quarterly (1997)
The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer": On the Career of a German Epithet from Luther to Kant -- Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, Enthusiasm and Enlightenment in Europe, 1650-1850 (1997), pp. 85-115 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  religious_culture  religious_belief  enthusiasm  Pietist  Reformation  politics-and-religion  sectarianism  Luther  Kant  imagination  rationality  rational_religion  clergy  authority  self  self-knowledge  self-control  public_sphere  public_disorder  status  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Lamb - Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder | Eighteenth-Century Studies -2011
Project MUSE - Jonathan Lamb. "Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder." Eighteenth-Century Studies 45, no. 1 (2011): 53-69 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Imagination can put the world together or tear it apart, depending on how it works. Comparing the Cartesians and the empiricists of the eighteenth century, it is evident that the latter are more seriously invested in imagination than the former, partly because they rely on conjecture for the discovery of facts while the Cartesians use imagination to dispel the authority of sense impressions. Is it possible to suppose that when imagination becomes disordered, conjecture and factuality begin to be at odds? By using Northanger Abbey as a test case, the essay finds that there is a kind of fact-based empiricism (represented by Catherine Morland) that is hostile to conjecture but at the same time hospitable to romance. What are the implications of such a state of affairs for empirical truth and the probability of the novel?
article  Project_MUSE  lit_crit  epistemology  imagination  Cartesian  empiricism  18thC  19thC  Austen  novels  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Roger D. Lund - Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude
Roger D. Lund
Journal of the History of Ideas
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 53-74
True wit is Nature to advantage dress' d
What oft was thought but ne'er so well ecpress' d
Downloaded pdf to Note - duplicate somewhere in Dropbox EF libraries
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  faculties  reason  understanding  imagination  wit  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-emotions  gentleman  poetry  genius  creativity  Innovation  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  Locke  Malebranche  deception  Pope  Dryden  English_lit  French_lit  Addison  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Hoyt Trowbridge: Joseph Warton on the Imagination (1937)
JSTOR: Modern Philology, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Aug., 1937), pp. 73-87 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  aesthetics  lit_crit  18thC  imagination  Pope  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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