dunnettreader + article + history_of_science   76

Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
M. Ali Khan, The Irony in/of Economic Theory | JSTOR - MLN Vol. 108, No. 4 (Sep., 1993)
MLN, Vol. 108, No. 4, French Issue (Sep., 1993), pp. 759-803 -- DOI: 10.2307/2904961 -- via Eric Schliesser, attack on lack of reflexive thought by economists about the nature of their own enterprise and the assumptions undergirding their work -- starts with Samuelson's justification of the language of mathematics, and includes discussion of Kenneth Boulding's attack on his own profession for its failure to engage in philosophy of science, referring back positively to Veblen's critique -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  economic_models  history_of_science  history-and-social_sciences  economic_history  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  mathematization  Methodenstreit  Samuelson  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy" by | Phronesis 50.1 (2005): 1-42.
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own development required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius who all looked to contemporary technology to supply that model. However, they did not all agree on what kind of device should be used. In this paper I explore the way these ancients made use of technology as a model for the developing embryo. However, my purpose here is more than just the historical interest of knowing which devices were used by whom and how each of them worked; I shall largely ignore the details of how the various devices actually worked. Instead I shall look at the use of technology from a philosophical perspective. As we shall see, the different choices of device reveal fundamental differences in the way each thinker understood the nature of biological development itself. Thus, the central aim of this paper is to examine, not who used what devices and how they worked, but why they used those particular devices and what they thought their functioning could tell us about the nature of embryological phenomena. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  ancient_Greece  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  embryology  scientific_culture  scientific_method  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry. "Organismal Natures" | Apeiron: a journal for ancient philosophy and science (2008): 47-74.
Aristotle agrees with the negative conclusion of Galen that the growth and development of living things cannot be due to material forces operating according to chance. For Aristotle, the process of development is structured according to the form of the organism being generated by it. Development ‘follows upon’ the organism’s substantial being and exists for the sake of it rather than vice versa. This confers a certain order and direction on the process that cannot be accounted for in terms of the random motions of atoms or the undirected actions of Love and Strife (Empedocles). He accepts that natural generation involves material-level forces of the sort Democritus proposed; however, he insists that when operating by themselves these undirected causes would only produce a living thing by chance. And generation is far too regular for that. But Aristotle rejects the further inference — endorsed by Galen — that the teleological structure imposed on a developing organism must be traced to an intelligent agent that puts the organism together according to its end like some kind of internalized Demiurge. Nature, Aristotle says, does not deliberate. -- By invoking ‘natures’ as the cause of development, Galen says, Aristotle offers an account which is entirely vacuous. On the other hand, Denis Walsh has recently argued that the concept of Aristotelian natures plays the same role in development as the modern concept of phenotypic plasticity and that in this sense Aristotelian natures have an indispensable role to play contemporary evolutionary biology. -- My aim in this paper is not to defend an Aristotelian approach to modern biology but rather to explore the concept of organismal natures in the context of Aristotle’s teleology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  teleology  design-nature  materialism  Democritus  Empedocles  Galen  forms  evolutionary_biology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Aristotle's Pluralistic Realism" | The Monist 94.2 (2011): 198-222
The University of Western Ontario -- In this paper I explore Aristotle’s views on natural kinds and the compatibility of pluralism and realism, a topic that has generated considerable interest among contemporary philosophers. I argue that, when it came to zoology, Aristotle denied that there is only one way of organizing the diversity of the living world into natural kinds that will yield a single, unified system of classification. Instead, living things can be grouped and regrouped into various cross-cutting kinds on the basis of objective similarities and differences in ways that subserve the explanatory context. Since the explanatory aims of zoology are diverse and variegated, the kinds it recognizes must be equally diverse and variegated. At the same time, there are certain constraints on which kinds can be selected. And those constraints derive more from the causal structure of the world than from the proclivities of the classifier (hence the realism). This distinguishes Aristotle’s version of pluralistic realism from those contemporary versions (like Dupré’s “promiscuous realism”) that treat all or most classifications of a given domain as equally legitimate and not just a sub-set of kinds recognized by the science that studies it. By contrast, Aristotle privileges scientifically important kinds on the basis of their role in causal investigations. On this picture natural kinds are those kinds with the sort of causal structure that allows them to enter into scientific explanations. In the final section I argue that Aristotle’s zoology should remain of interest to philosophers and biologists alike insofar as it combines a pluralistic form of realism with a rank-free approach to classification. - didn't download
article  intellectual_history  Aristotle  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  ancient_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  natural_kinds  classification  species  explanation  causation  biology  animals  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Heyd - From a Rationalist Theology to Cartesian Voluntarism: David Derodon and Jean-Robert Chouet | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1979), pp. 527-542
Shift from proto Leibniz determinism to extreme Voluntarism - 1660 and later in Geneva - Chouet introduced Cartesian mechanism to French Reformed - a perspective on the relationship between theology and 17thC mechanical philosophy -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  17thC  Geneva  Calvinist  rational_religion  God-attributes  determinism  voluntarism  laws_of_nature  Descartes  Cartesian  mechanism  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Benjamin Milner - Francis Bacon: The Theological Foundations of Valerius Terminus | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 58, No. 2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 245-264
Why Bacon thought he needed theological foundations to his advancement of learning and natural philosophy program & why he never finished or published that work. Bibliography has a lot of antiquity and 17thC scepticism or atheism as well as Calvinist and Puritan stuff -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  science-and-religion  history_of_science  17thC  Bacon  atheism_panic  scepticism  Calvinist  Puritans  curiosity  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Geraldine Barnes - Curiosity, Wonder, and William Dampier's Painted Prince | JSTOR: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Vol. 6, No. 1 (Spring - Summer, 2006), pp. 31-50
Dampier was a "buccaneer", sometime Admiralty sponsored explorer, and his "painted prince" a tatooed native brought back from a voyage, who died in 1692. Most of the publicity involving Dampier (recounting his travels, a medallion by Evelyn) in the 1690s. The article deals with growing cultural practices associated with exploration, from the voyages themselves and publishing and images associated with them to growth in consumer interest and the virtuoso and collector crazes. -- references to Swift and Gulliver -- also probably relevant to Three Hours after Marriage
article  jstor  cultural_history  history_of_science  exploration  17thC  18thC  natural_history  comparative_anthropology  curiosity  virtuosos  collections  consumerism  Swift  Gulliver  Arbuthnot  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Harrison - Descartes on Animals | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 167 (Apr., 1992), pp. 219-227
Some support for Cottingham thesis that Descartes wasn't the monster toward animals that Cartesians like Malebranche were. Further bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  moral_philosophy  natural_philosophy  17thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  animals  reason  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Harrison - “Science” and “Religion”: Constructing the Boundaries | JSTOR: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 86, No. 1 (January 2006), pp. 81-106
Since "science" didn't emerge as distinct until 19thC, how does "history of science" deal with the past both in re science and in re other subjects and activities including "religion" -- which is itself a concept with a fairly recent history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
NATHANIEL WOLLOCH - Edward Gibbon's Cosmology | JSTOR: International Journal of the Classical Tradition, Vol. 17, No. 2 (JUNE 2010), pp. 165-177
This article is a study of Edward Gibbon's view of the human mastery and cultivation of nature as a sign of cultural progress. It examines the sources of Gibbon's views on this issue, and specifically the influence of the traditional Western anthropocentric cosmology on his historiographical interpretations. Gibbon's views on the command of nature are highlighted as forming a central part of his general historiographical and philosophical world view. He is depicted as situating the common early modern praise of mastering nature within a distinctly historiographical context. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  historiography-18thC  Gibbon  progress  Western_civ  nature-mastery  natural_history  Enlightenment_Project  environment  eco-theology  cosmology  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Schaffer - Dévots et philosophes mécanistes: Ames et esprits dans la philosophie de la Nature, à l'époque de la Restauration anglaise | JSTOR: Ethnologie française, nouvelle serie, T. 23, No. 3 (Septembre 1993), pp. 316-335
Recent historiography of the Scientific Revolution has challenged the assumption that the achievements of seventeenth-century natural philosophy can easily be described as the mechanization of the world-picture. The clock-work world was triumphant and inevitably so. However, a close examination of one key group of natural philosophers working in England during the 1670s shows that their program necessarily incorporated souls and spirits, attractions and congruities, within both their ontology and their epistemology. Any natural philosophical strategy which excluded spirits and sympathies from its world was condemned as tending to subversion and irreligion. Through a description of the historical context of experimental work, the present article sets out to show how a philosophy of matter and spirit was deliberately constructed by the end of the seventeenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  17thC  British_history  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  mechanism  soul  mind-body  Boyle  More_Henry  scepticism  atheism_panic  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. R. Jacob - Boyle's Atomism and the Restoration Assault on Pagan Naturalism | JSTOR: Social Studies of Science, Vol. 8, No. 2 (May, 1978), pp. 211-233
This paper places Boyle's atomism in its social context, and describes the political motives which underlay it. Boyle's physico-theology was designed to answer the ideological challenges thrown up by the turbulent events of mid-seventeenth-century England. After the Restoration, Boyle and the Royal Society continued to use his natural philosophy to this end. One important example is Boyle's A Free Enquiry... (written in 1666, but not published until 1686). This addresses itself to the heretical implications of scholastic natural philosophy. Scholasticism, argues Boyle, assumes a universe in which a purposive rationality works quite apart from God and divine providence, and in which there is no distinction between 'nature' and 'providence'; this may lead to some form of 'paganizing naturalism', and so must be overthrown. Boyle's strategy is first to show that the scholastic conception is not scientifically valid, and then to offer his corpuscular philosophy as a superior alternative. However, Boyle's real enemy was not scholastic theory per se, but those who relied on it - papists and paganizing deists. In showing that both cherished outmoded assumptions about nature, Boyle attacked both kinds of idolatry simultaneously. The timing of the appearance of A Free Enquiry also added to its effectiveness as a shrewd piece of Anglican apologetics. It was published just when, because of James II's religious policy, the threat of subversion by papists and 'atheists' bulked larger than ever before in the minds of Anglican churchmen. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  church_history  natural_philosophy  17thC  Boyle  corpuscular  experimental_philosophy  Royal_Society  pagans  Deism  scholastics  anti-Catholic  natural_religion  Providence  God-attributes  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Political Science and the Enlightenment of Enthusiasm | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 51-69
I provide a narrative of the emergence of an expressly articulated @'political science@' in the Scottish Enlightenment. Political science was designed by Hume, Smith, and others to advance both a Newtonian method for the study of politics and a politics of moderation whose tasks included a critique of enthusiasm. In this way, poltiical science, moderation, and (anti)enthusiasm were conceptually connected. The emergence of political science, understood in this way, required a number of conceptual changes in a structure of argument shaped largely by Locke. These conceptual changes, in turn, fixed a rhetorical framework for persistent debates over the methodological and political identity of political science, even as ideology literally replaced enthusiasm. These persistent debates reveal the relevance of the history of political science as a forum for remembrance, reflection, and critique. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  18thC  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  science_of_man  social_sciences  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Smith  enthusiasm  Newtonian  ideology  Locke  rhetoric-political  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin - Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and Its Therapies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 131-154
During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. René Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim and, on that basis, he offered practical medical advice to others and advertised the expectation that, taking his own advice, he would live a very long time. This paper describes what Cartesian medicine looked like in practice and what that practice owed to the power of modernist Reason. -- huge bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  17thC  Descartes  Bacon  natural_philosophy  physiology  psychology  emotions  mind-body  diet  aging  humours  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Gorham - Mind-Body Dualism and the Harvey-Descartes Controversy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Apr., 1994), pp. 211-234
Looks quite helpful - different explanations of Descartes concern with Harvey showing heart as autonomic engine of circulation -- some attribute it to rationalist vs empiricist methodology, others to different ways of being empiricist, others to Descartes's metaphysical objection that an apparently self generating motion didn't fit with his mechanism hypothesis -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  physiology  anatomy  experimental_philosophy  rationalist  empiricism  mind-body  17thC  Descartes  Harvey  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Observation and Experiment in 17thC Anatomy | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2008
(1) Observation and Experiment in Mechanistic Anatomy (pp. 531-532) Domenico Bertoloni Meli and Rebecca Wilkin. *-- (2) Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks (pp. 533-567) Rebecca M. Wilkin. *-- (3) Harvey's and Highmore's Accounts of Chick Generation (pp. 568-614) Karin J. Ekholm. *-- (4) Experimenting with Chymical Bodies: Reinier de Graaf's Investigations of the Pancreas (pp. 615-664) Evan R. Ragland. *-- (5) The Collaboration between Anatomists and Mathematicians in the Mid-17thC with a Study of Images as Experiments and Galileo's Role in Steno's "Myology" (pp. 665-709) Domenico Bertoloni Meli
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  experimental_philosophy  anatomy  physiology  mechanism  corpuscular  17thC  Descartes  Malebranche  Harvey  chemistry  mathematics  Galileo  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Epicureanism in Renaissance Moral and Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1992), pp. 573-583
Short but looks helpful - compares Lorenzo Valla attack on Aristotelian virtue ethics and Scholastics Christian Aristotelian hybrid with far more extensive engagement by Gassendi with Epicureanism. But both contributed to Christianity incorporating some notions of pleasure into sin and salvation. -- not much bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  theology  15thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Italy  France  Gassendi  Epicurean  virtue_ethics  Aristotelian  sin  salvation  pleasure  hedonistic  Christianity  materialism  corpuscular  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Carole Rawcliffe - 'Delectable Sightes and Fragrant Smelles': Gardens and Health in Late Medieval and Early Modern England | JSTOR: Garden History, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Spring, 2008), pp. 3-21
In an age before the development of the microscope and the advent of modern medicine, gardens constituted a frontline defence in the battle against disease. This was in part because of the religious symbolism of the 'Fall' and of the expulsion from Paradise. But Englishmen and women were also becoming increasingly familiar with Classical Greek medical theory, which emphasized the close relationship between health and the environment, while also stressing the dramatic impact of both scent and sight upon human physiology and psychology. Whereas foul odours (miasmas) were believed to spread sickness, floral perfume, fresh air and a verdant landscape helped to prevent it by promoting physical and mental stability. The onset of plague (1348-50) created a rapidly expanding popular market for advice literature, which, in turn, informed manuals on the design and cultivation of gardens. A study of late medieval monastic houses and hospitals reveals the extent to which these ideas were translated into practice, so that the sick might enjoy the medicinal benefits of green space, and the healthy engage in recreation for mind and body. -- didn't download
article  jstor  British_history  medieval  16thC  17thC  cultural_history  history_of_science  medicine  botany  gardens  psychology  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Jenner - The Politics of London Air John Evelyn's Fumifugium and the Restoration | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 535-551
Historians have commonly described John Evelyn's pamphlet about London smoke pollution, Fumifugium, as a precocious example of environmental concern. This paper argues that such an interpretation is too simple. Evelyn's proposals are shown to be closely related to political allegory and the panegyrics written to welcome the newly restored Charles II. However, the paper also shows that Fumifugium was not simply a literary conceit; rather it exemplified the mid-seventeenth-century English interest in the properties of air that is visible in both the Hartlib circle and the early Royal Society. --didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  political_culture  history_of_science  British_history  Restoration  environment  London  pollution  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  Hartlib_Circle  Royal_Society  Evelyn  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhoda Rappaport - G.-F. Rouelle: An Eighteenth-Century Chemist and Teacher | JSTOR: Chymia, Vol. 6 (1960), pp. 68-101
Interesting from vantage of Paris public audiences for scientific lectures, both teaching and more society entertainment. Chemistry still closely connected with medicine, pharmacy, apothecary professions. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  18thC  France  Paris  French_Enlightenment  chemistry  medicine  science-public  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jon Eklund - Of a Spirit in the Water: Some Early Ideas on the Aerial Dimension | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Dec., 1976), pp. 527-550
In tracking 18thC developments in chemistry, looks at work on composition -- trying to understand the active elements and the way they act -- in various mineral waters or "spaw water" -- of interest long before Boyle and well after 18thC -- of application in methodology to work on composition of gases -- see re attitudes and understanding re both physiology of disease and curative process of spas that Bolingbroke and both his wives attended -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  chemistry  medicine  18thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  leisure  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhoda Rappaport - Hooke on Earthquakes: Lectures, Strategy and Audience | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 19, No. 2 (Jul., 1986), pp. 129-146
Separating Hooke's prescient geology and fossil theories from his other speculative evidence, his manner of presentation etc -- an interesting angle on the scientific culture and social processes of knowledge production and communication
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  Hooke  geology  paleontology  cosmology  sociology_of_knowledge  Royal_Society  virtuosos  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Science and Civilization under William and Mary | JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 43, No. 2, Jul., 1989
TOC -- (1) The Crown, the Public and the New Science, 1689-1702 (pp. 99-116) M. C. W. Hunter. (2) William III and His Two Navies (pp. 117-132) J. R. Bruijn. (3) 'Bright Enough for All Our Purposes': John Locke's Conception of a Civilized Society (pp. 133-153) J. M. Dunn. (4) Clockmaking in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 155-165)
J. H. Leopold. (5) The Glorious Revolution and Medicine in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 167-190) Simon Schaffer. (6) Leeuwenhoek and Other Dutch Correspondents of the Royal Society (pp. 191-207) L. C. Palm. (7) Christiaan Huygens and Newton's Theory of Gravitation (pp. 209-222) H. A. M. Snelders. (8) Huygens' 'Traité de la Lumière' and Newton's 'Opticks': Pursuing and Eschewing Hypotheses (pp. 223-247) A. E. Shapiro. (9) The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1988. Antoni van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 (pp. 249-273) A. R. Hall
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  science-and-politics  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  Glorious_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  community-virtual  Locke  British_Navy  William_III  Nine_Years_War  technology  instruments  Huygens  Newton  medicine  university  optics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Mayhew - Mapping Science's Imagined Community: Geography as a Republic of Letters, 1600-1800 | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 73-92
This paper extends discussions of the sociology of the early modern scientific community by paying particular attention to the geography of that community. The paper approaches the issue in terms of the scientific community's self image as a Republic of Letters. Detailed analysis of patterns of citation in two British geography books is used to map the 'imagined community' of geographers from the late Renaissance to the age of Enlightenment. What were the geographical origins of authors cited in geography books and how did this change over time? To what extent was scholarship from other cultural arenas integrated into European geography? Such an analysis draws on and interrogates recent work in the history of science and in the history of scholarship more broadly, work which has made important contributions to our understanding of the historical geography of scholarly communities in early modern Europe. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  17thC  18thC  Republic_of_Letters  cultural_history  geography  cosmopolitanism  community-virtual  professionalization  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Miscellaneous Methods: Authors, Societies and Journals in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 159-186
Historians of science have long acknowledged the important role that journals play in the scientific enterprise. They both secure the shared values of a scientific community and certify what that community takes to be licensed knowledge. The advent of the first learned periodicals in the mid-seventeenth century was therefore a major event. But why did this event happen when it did, and how was the permanence of the learned journal secured? This paper reveals some of the answers. It examines the shifting fortunes of one of the earliest of natural-philosophical periodicals, the "Philosophical Transactions," launched in London in 1665 by Henry Oldenburg. The paper shows how fraught the enterprise of journal publishing was in the Europe of that period, and, not least, it draws attention to a number of publications that arose out of the commercial realm of the Restoration to rival (or parody) Oldenburg's now famous creation. By doing so it helps restore to view the hard work that underpinned the republic of letters. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  journals-academic  publishing  satire-and-science  professionalization  academies  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Naylor - Introduction: Historical Geographies of Science: Places, Contexts, Cartographies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 1-12
Issue TOC -- (1) Locating Field Science: A Geographical Family Expedition to Glen Roy, Scotland (pp. 13-33) Hayden Lorimer and Nick Spedding. (2) From Lake Nyassa to Philadelphia: A Geography of the Zambesi Expedition, 1858-64 (pp. 35-52) Lawrence Dritsas. (3) Natural History Societies in Late Victorian Scotland and the Pursuit of Local Civic Science (pp. 53-72) Diarmid A. Finnegan. (4) Mapping Science's Imagined Community: Geography as a Republic of Letters, 1600-1800 (pp. 73-92) Robert Mayhew. (5) Talk and Testimony: Geographical Reflections on Scientific Habits. An Afterword (pp. 93-100) David N. Livingstone
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  17thC  18thC  19thC  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Introduction by Richard Sorrenson to Issue: Did the Royal Society Matter in the 18thC? | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 130-132
Nice overview of utility how Royal Society saw itself and others saw it -- to society, to the state, sociability of clubs, interest in "wonder" of natural world, and reputation and acknowledgement local and international. Ftnts have good recent works.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  18thC  British_history  Royal_Society  clubs  sociability  Republic_of_Letters  experimental_philosophy  natural_history  virtuosos  Newtonian  technology  academies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers and Robert J. Mayhew - Rethinking 'Disciplinary' History: Geography in British Universities, c.1580-1887 | JSTOR: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2002), pp. 11-29
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Against a background of recent work in the history of geography and of geographical knowledge, the paper considers evidence for the place of geography within British universities before the formal establishment of the first departments of geography. Attention is paid to geography's discursive connections with other subjects within given university curricula, and to the values placed upon its teaching by contemporaries. The paper argues that extant historiographies for British geography should be revised in the light of such evidence. More importantly, the paper raises questions about the sites and intellectual spaces in which geography has been situated and about the content, nature and purpose of writing geography's 'disciplinary' history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  colonialism  exploration  public_sphere  university  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  education  Royal_Society  military_history  maps  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
J. C. Pinto de Oliveira: Carnap, Kuhn, and revisionism: on the publication of Structure in Encyclopedia | JSTOR: Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie, Vol. 38, No. 1 (April, 2007), pp. 147-157
Didn't download paper -- reacting to Michael Friedman -- In recent years, a revisionist process focused on logical positivism can be observed, particularly regarding Carnap's work. In this paper, I argue against the interpretation that Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions having been published in the International Encyclopedia of Unified Science, co-edited by Carnap, is evidence of the revisionist idea that Carnap "would have found Structure philosophically congenial". I claim that Kuhn's book, from Carnap's point of view, is not in philosophy of science but rather in history of science (in the context of a sharp discovery—justification distinction). It could also explain the fact that, despite his sympathetic letters to Kuhn as editor, Carnap never refers to Kuhn's book in his work in philosophy of science.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  Carnap  Kuhn  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael Friedman: Kant, Kuhn, And The Rationality Of Science* | JSTOR: Philosophy of Science, Vol. 69, No. 2 (June 2002), pp. 171-190
Downloaded pdf to Note -- This paper considers the evolution of the problem of scientific rationality from Kant through Carnap to Kuhn. I argue for a relativized and historicized version of the original Kantian conception of scientific a priori principles and examine the way in which these principles change and develop across revolutionary paradigm shifts. The distinctively philosophical enterprise of reflecting upon and contextualizing such principles is then seen to play a key role in making possible rational intersubjective communication between otherwise incommensurable paradigms.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  Logical_Positivism  sociology_of_knowledge  historicism  Kant  Carnap  Kuhn  a_priori  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Jason Goldberg: Historicism, Entrenchment, and Conventionalism | JSTOR: Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie, Vol. 40, No. 2 (December 2009), pp. 259-276
Downloaded pdf to Note -- . V. Quine famously argues that though all knowledge is empirical, mathematics is entrenched relative to physics and the special sciences. Further, entrenchment accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Michael Friedman challenges Quine's view by appealing to historicism, the thesis that the nature of science is illuminated by taking into account its historical development. Friedman argues on historicist grounds that mathematical claims serve as principles constitutive of languages within which empirical claims in physics and the special sciences can be formulated and tested, where these mathematical claims are themselves not empirical but conventional. For Friedman, their conventional, constitutive status accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Here I evaluate Friedman's challenge to Quine and Quine's likely response. I then show that though we have reason to find Friedman's challenge successful, his positive project requires further development before we can endorse it. -- 88 references
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  Quine  Carnap  Kuhn  historicism  empiricism  Logical_Positivism  naturalism  mathematics  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
James Chandler - Edgeworth and the Lunar Enlightenment (2011) | Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE - James Chandler. "Edgeworth and the Lunar Enlightenment." Eighteenth-Century Studies45.1 (2011): 87-104. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Maria Edgeworth was arguably the most important novelist writing in English during the early Regency period. Her narrative art was informed by her influential educational theories, and in its turn it decisively shaped the very different oeuvres of Jane Austen and Sir Walter Scott, whose successes in fiction would somewhat eclipse hers. If Edgeworth’s novels came to seem puzzling in their design, the reason may lie in the distinctive disciplinary context from which they emerged. For Edgeworth followed her highly accomplished and polymath father in engaging with the projects of the Lunar Society of Birmingham, which included diverse intellectuals such as James Watt, Erasmus Darwin, and Joseph Priestley. The Lunar commitment to improvement through experiment, I argue, not only set the terms for the agricultural, mechanical, and educational efforts carried out by Richard Edgeworth and his daughter on their Irish estate, it also helps to make sense of the novels and tales Maria wrote there, especially her remarkable analysis of contemporary fashionable life inBelinda (1801).
article  Project_MUSE  18thC  cultural_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  belles-lettres  English_lit  novels  Edgeworth  Lunar_Society  learned_societies  improvement  education  education-women  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Noah Heringman: The Style of Natural Catastrophes (2003)
JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 66, No. 1/2 (2003), pp. 97-133 -- discusses David Mallett 1728 poem as well as 1750s eartquakes
article  jstor  literary_history  history_of_science  18thC  Britain  nature  catastrophe  geology  style  aesthetics  sublime  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
P. Fontes da Costa: The Culture of Curiosity at The Royal Society in the First Half of the Eighteenth Century (2002)
JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 56, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 147-166 -- This paper is concerned with the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the meetings of The Royal Society during the first half of the eighteenth century. It is argued that these activities cannot, as some historians have maintained, be viewed as a mere opportunity for the entertainment of the Fellows. Instead, the reports and exhibitions fulfilled multiple roles, including the promotion of inquiry, education, polite discourse, as well as entertainment, aspects that were intimately connected during that period. Some of the individual and collective interests involved in the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the Society are also discussed. It is argued that these interests should be considered within the broad context of the culture of curiosity at The Royal Society in this period.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  cultural_history  18thC  Britain  Royal_Society  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bernard Fay: Learned Societies in Europe and America in the Eighteenth Century (1932)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jan., 1932), pp. 255-266 -- highlights importance of Freemasonry -- suggests 2 streams of Freemasonry in 18thC (1) learning and useful knowledge (stress useful - Ramsay may have been a long-time promoter, since 1730s, of Encyclopédie type project) and (2) mystic with alchemy focus. Focus on local societies on both sides of Atlantic with lists and dates formed. Contrast with more formal and "rigid" scientific Royal Society.
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-American  Scottish_Enlightenment  Britain  France  American_colonies  academies  Royal_Society  Encyclopédie  learned_societies  Republic_of_Letters  history_of_science  technology  Freemasonry  Franklin_Ben  Ramsay  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gary Marker: Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is? | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Marker, Gary. “Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is?.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/35. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This strange symbiosis of Russia and Europe, at least from the sixteenth century onward, has been conveyed primarily through metaphors of teleology: primitive (or not), uncivil (or not); ignorant, crude, superstitious, uneducated, undeveloped. In short, backward. For European (and many Russian) literati “backward” and “Russian” were virtually interchangeable in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and as such they resided in a state of misfortune needing to be overcome.
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Russia  Peter_the_Great  cultural_history  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  Franklin_Ben  nationalism  historians-and-state  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  development  modernization  academies  language-politics  education  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
John V. Pickstone: Working Knowledges Before and After circa 1800: Practices and Disciplines in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine (2007)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 98, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 489-516 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Historians of science, inasmuch as they are concerned with knowledges and practices rather than institutions, have tended of late to focus on case studies of common processes such as experiment and publication. In so doing, they tend to treat science as a single category, with various local instantiations. Or, alternatively, they relate cases to their specific local contexts. In neither approach do the cases or their contexts build easily into broader histories, reconstructing changing knowledge practices across time and space. This essay argues that by systematically deconstructing the practices of science and technology and medicine (STM) into common, recurrent elements, we can gain usefully “configurational” views, not just of particular cases and contexts but of synchronic variety and diachronic changes, both short term and long. To this end, we can begin with the customary actors’ disciplines of early modern knowledge (natural philosophy, natural history, mixed mathematics, and experimental philosophy), which can be understood as elemental “ways of knowing and working,” variously combined and disputed. I argue that these same working knowledges, together with a later mode—synthetic experimentation and systematic invention—may also serve for the analysis of STM from the late eighteenth century to the present. 
article  jstor  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  intellectual_history  natural_philosophy  medicine  physiology  technology  industry  Scientific_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  17thC  18thC  19thC 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
John V. Pickstone: Sketching Together the Modern Histories of Science, Technology, and Medicine (2011)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 102, No. 1 (March 2011), pp. 123-133 -- roundup and looking forward article in issue Focus: Between and Beyond “Histories of Science” and “Histories of Medicine” -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay explores ways to “write together” the awkwardly jointed histories of “science” and “medicine”—but it also includes other “arts” (in the old sense) and technologies. It draws especially on the historiography of medicine, but I try to use terms that are applicable across all of science, technology, and medicine (STM). I stress the variety of knowledges and practices in play at any time and the ways in which the ensembles change. I focus on the various relations of “science” and “medicine,” as they were understood for a succession of periods—from mainly agricultural societies, through industrial societies, to our biomedical present—trying to sketch a history that encompasses daily practices and understandings as well as major conceptual and technical innovations. The model is meant to facilitate inquiry across topics and across times, including those to come.
article  jstor  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  medicine  technology  biology  chemistry  physiology  natural_philosophy  mathematics  communication  IT  evolution  university  academies  education  industry  Industrial_Revolution  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Scientific_Revolution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook: The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution (2011)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 102, No. 1 (March 2011), pp. 102-108 -- Issue Focus: Between and Beyond “Histories of Science” and “Histories of Medicine” -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The “new philosophy” of the seventeenth century has continued to be explained mainly on its own terms: as a major philosophical turn. Twentieth-century modernism gave pride of place to big ideas and reinforced the tendency to explain the rise of science in light of new ideas. Such orientations subordinated medicine (and technology) to sciences that appeared to be more theoretical. In attempts to persuade historians of science of the importance of medicine, then, many authors took an approach arguing that the major changes in the history of medicine during the so-called scientific revolution arose from philosophical commitments. Yet because medicine is also intimately connected to other aspects of life, its histories proved to be recalcitrant to such reductions and so continue to offer many possibilities for those who seek fresh means to address histories of body and mind united rather than divided.
article  jstor  historiography  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  medicine  biology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  mind-body  psychology  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  cultural_history  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Gad Prudovsky: Can we Ascribe to Past Thinkers Concepts They had no Linguistic Means to Express? (1997)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 15-31 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article takes a clear-cut case in which a historian (Alexander Koyré) ascribes to a writer (Galileo) a concept ("inertial mass") which neither the writer nor his contemporaries had the linguistic means to express. On the face of it the case may seem a violation of a basic methodological maxim in historiography: "avoid anachronistic ascriptions!" The aim of the article is to show that Koyré's ascription, and others of its kind, are legitimate; and that the methodological maxim should not be given the strict reading which some writers recommend. More specifically, the conceptual repertoire of historical figures need not be reconstructed solely in terms of the social and linguistic conventions of their time and place.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  methodology  language  concepts  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers: Place and the "Spatial Turn" in Geography and in History (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 4 (Oct., 2009), pp. 637-658 - focuses om place and space in recent Enlightenment studies in history of science -- downloaded pdf to Note -- on "most downloaded" list on Project MUSE
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  Scientific_Revolution  history_of_science  geography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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