dunnettreader + article + free_will   20

John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, Stoics Against Stoics in Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill (2012) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/5 (2012), 935-52 -- In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ (ἐφ᾽ ἡμῖν) and that these things are the product of our choice (προαίρεσις). These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Cambridge Platonism, Epictetus, Freewill and Determinism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  determinism  free_will  late_antiquity  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  17thC  18thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Unknowable Truths and Omniscience: A Reply to Kvanvig | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 553-566
The various attribute debates in analytical_philosophy tend to be piecemeal. They also often smuggle in positions on heavily debated issues such as free_will. Helpful pulling apart various threads of theism debates on attributes, determinism and theodicy -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  God-attributes  free_will  theodicy  cosmology  determinism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Frans Svensson - THE ROLE OF VIRTUE IN DESCARTES' ETHICAL THEORY, OR: WAS DESCARTES A VIRTUE ETHICIST? | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3 (JULY 2010), pp. 215-236
Looks useful 1st by trying to set criteria to distinguish virtue ethics from concern with virtue in other metaethics (deontology, consequentialism, eudaimonia) - he then looks at Descartes's letters to Queen Christina , supplemented with some remarks on moral psychology in Passions of the Soul. Contra Lisa Shapiro in a recent Blackwell Companion, his verdict is No. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  metaethics  virtue_ethics  virtue  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  good  reason  reason-passions  free_will  Descartes  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche's Philosophy of Action (2009) :: SSRN - in Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Action, 2010
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 270 -- Nietzsche holds that people lack freedom of the will in any sense that would be sufficient for ascriptions of moral responsibility; that the conscious experience we have of willing is actually epiphenomenal with respect to the actions that follow that experience; and that our actions largely arise through non-conscious processes (psychological and physiological) of which we are only dimly aware, and over which we exercise little or no conscious control. At the same time, Nietzsche, always a master of rhetoric, engages in a “persuasive definition” (Stevenson 1938) of the language of “freedom” and “free will,” to associate the positive valence of these terms with a certain Nietzschean ideal of the person unrelated to traditional notions of free will. -- No of Pages: 18 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, free will, moral responsibility, freedom, philosophy of action, epiphenomenalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  action-theory  Nietzsche  free_will  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  mind  consciousness  physiology  psychology  naturalism  responsibility  guilt  freedom  epiphenomenal  aesthetics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Keim Campbell - Issue intro: New Essays on the Metaphysics of Moral Responsibility | JSTOR: The Journal of Ethics, Vol. 12, No. 3/4 (2008), pp. 193-201
This is the introduction to a volume of new essays in the metaphysics of moral responsibility by John Martin Fischer, Carl Ginet, Ishtiyaque Haji, Alfred R. Mele, Derk Pereboom, Paul Russell, and Peter van Inwagen. I provide some background for the essays, cover the main debates in the metaphysics of moral responsibility, and emphasize some of the authors' contributions to this area of philosophy. - didn't download
journal  article  jstor  moral_philosophy  metaethics  metaphysics  free_will  responsibility  human_nature  action-theory  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Claudia Blöser, Aron Schöpf and Marcus Willaschek - Autonomy, Experience, and Reflection. On a Neglected Aspect of Personal Autonomy | JSTOR: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Vol. 13, No. 3 (June 2010), pp. 239-253
The aim of this paper is to suggest that a necessary condition of autonomy has not been sufficiently recognized in the literature: the capacity to critically reflect on one's practical attitudes (desires, preferences, values, etc.) in the light of new experiences. It will be argued that most prominent accounts of autonomy—ahistorical as well as historysensitive—have either altogether failed to recognize this condition or at least failed to give an explicit account of it. -- discusses internalist (Frankfurt's "free_will" 1st and 2nd order desires that involves critical reflection; ahistorical, Taylor's "punctuated"?) and externalist (adds conditions of information not just psychology in determining values) - this paper adds ability to reflect on values and experience going forward when new experience doesn't fit with expectations from existing values --focus is on practical judgment without extending into a particular view of moral philosophy etc though points out where theorists in other areas have used a narrower notion of autonomy --bibliography may be useful eg Rawls -- didn't download
article  jstor  human_nature  free_will  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  autonomy  practical_reason  values  development-personal  bibliography  Taylor_Charles  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
George Soros - Fallibility, reflexivity, and the human uncertainty principle - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
Lead article for special issue devoted to Soros and epistemology in social sciences more broadly compared with natural sciences and Popper's version of falsibility in scientific method -- He's making progress in formalizing his theory and putting it in context of other theorists - sees his fallibility and reflexivity combination as major factor in "Knightian uncertainty" - Downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  scientific_method  falsification  deduction  Popper  Soros  uncertainty  economic_theory  economic_models  financial_economics  capital_markets  FX  EMH  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  complexity  equilibrium  reflexivity  ontology-social  free_will  financial_crisis  financial_system  fallibility  downloaded  EF-add  fundamentals  methodology  cognition  agency  intentionality 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Innocence of Becoming by Brian Leiter :: SSRN - Oct 2013
I offer an interpretation of Nietzsche’s striking idea of “the innocence of becoming” (die Unschuld des Werdens), and offer a partial defense of its import, namely, that no one is ever morally responsible or guilty for what they do and that the so-called “reactive attitudes” are always misplaced. I focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the arguments as set out in Twilight of the Idols. First, there is Nietzsche’s hypothesis, partly psychological and partly historical or anthropological, that the ideas of “free” action or free will, and of responsibility for actions freely chosen or willed, were introduced primarily in order to justify punishment (“[m]en were considered ‘free’ so that they might be judged and punished”). Call this the Genetic Thesis about Free Will. Second, there is Nietzsche’s claim that the moral psychology, or “psychology of the will” as he calls it, that underlies this picture is, in fact, false — that, in fact, it is not true that every action is willed or that it reflects a purpose or that it originates in consciousness. Call these, in aggregate, the Descriptive Thesis about the Will. (Here I draw on earlier work.) Finally, there is articulation of a programmatic agenda, namely, to restore the “innocence of becoming” by getting rid of guilt and punishment based on guilt — not primarily because ascriptions of guilt and responsibility are false (though they are), but because a world understood as “innocent,” one understood in terms of “natural” cause and effect, is a better world in which to live. I thus try to explain and defend Zarathustra’s recommendation: “Enemy’ you shall say, but not villain; sick you shall say, but not scoundrel; fool you shall say, but not sinner.” Nietzsche’s views are contrasted with those of important modern writers on these topics, including P.F. Strawson and Gary Watson. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  morality-Christian  accountability  moral_psychology  free_will  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols by Brian Leiter :: SSRN
Leiter, Brian, Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols (October 27, 2013). Topoi (Forthcoming). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2345957 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2345957 -- This review essay of Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Idols" (1888) is part of the journal TOPOI's "Untimely Reviews" series of classic works of philosophy. The journal explains the idea of the series this way: "We take a classic of philosophy and ask an outstanding scholar in the same field to review it as if it had just been published. This implies that the classical work must be contrasted with both past and current literature and must be framed in the wider cultural context of the present day. The result is a litmus test for the work itself: Failure in accounting for relevant issues raised by contemporary literature reveals that, in those respects, our classic has indeed been outpaced by later works. On the other hand, any success in capturing core topics of current discussion, or even anticipating and clarifying issues not yet well brought into focus by contemporary scholars, is the strongest proof of the liveliness of the work, no matter how long ago it was written." -- This essay tries to discharge the task for Nietzsche's TWILIGHT. Themes dealt with are Nietzsche's attacks on morality, on free will, on mental causation, on Socrates, and on Kant. Connections are drawn with contemporary work by Mark Johnston, David Rosenthal, and Daniel Wagner, among others. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  free_will  morality-Nietzche  Plato  Kant  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Millican - Hume, Causal Realism, and Causal Science | JSTOR: Mind, New Series, Vol. 118, No. 471 (Jul., 2009), pp. 647-712
The 'New Hume' interpretation, which sees Hume as a realist about 'thick' Causal powers, has been largely motivated by his evident commitment to causal language and causal science. In this, however, it is fundamentally misguided, failing to recognise how Hume exploits his anti-realist conclusions about (upper-case) Causation precisely to support (lower-case) causal science. When critically examined, none of the standard New Humean arguments—familiar from the work of Wright, Craig, Strawson, Buckle, Kail, and others—retains any significant force against the plain evidence of Hume's texts. But the most devastating objection comes from Hume's own applications of his analysis of causation, to the questions of 'the immateriality of the soul' and 'liberty and necessity'. These show that the New Hume interpretation has misunderstood the entire purpose of his 'Chief Argument', and presented him as advocating some of the very positions he is arguing most strongly against. -- paywall Oxford Journals 7 years until jstor
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  causation  scepticism  soul  free_will  determinism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sharon R. Krause : Two Concepts of Liberty in Montesquieu (2005) |T & F Online
Perspectives on Political Science, Volume 34, Issue 2, 2005, pages 88- 96, Available online: 07 Aug 2010, DOI: 10.3200/PPSC.34.2.88-96 -- political liberty (against abuse of government) and philosophical liberty (or freedom of will) -- Krause argues that, contra the deterministic reading of Montesquieu, philosophic liberty is important to him and how to make it work with political liberty
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  liberty  despotism  free_will  determinism  Montesquieu  natural_law  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Academia.edu  accountability  action-theory  aesthetics  agency  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  ancient_philosophy  animals  anti-Trinitarian  Aristotle  article  autonomy  Bayle  bibliography  books  British_history  Cambridge_Platonists  Cambridge_School  capital_markets  causation  Christianity  Cicero  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  clergy  cognition  complexity  consciousness  cosmology  court_culture  Cudworth  deduction  Descartes  despotism  determinism  development-personal  Donne  downloaded  economic_models  economic_theory  EF-add  EMH  emotions  empiricism  Epictetus  epiphenomenal  epistemology  equilibrium  Essay_on_Man  Europe-Early_Modern  fallibility  falsification  fate  financial_crisis  financial_economics  financial_system  find  fortune  freedom  freedom_of_conscience  free_will  fundamentals  FX  Germany  God-attributes  good  grace  Greek_lit  Grotius  guilt  heterodoxy  Horace  human_nature  Hume  Hume-causation  Hume-ethics  identity  intellectual_history  intentionality  journal  jstor  Justus_Lipsius  Kant  late_antiquity  Latin_lit  libertine  liberty  literary_history  Locke  Machiavelli  metaethics  metaphysics  methodology  mind  Montesquieu  morality-Christian  morality-Nietzche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  naturalism  natural_law  natural_religion  neo-Roman  Neostoicism  Nietzsche  normativity  ontology-social  pain  paywall  perception  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  physiology  Plato  Pocock  poetry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Popper  practical_reason  Providence  psychology  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  rational_religion  reason  reason-passions  reasons-externalism  reasons-internalism  reflexivity  Reformation  religious_belief  religious_history  Renaissance  republicanism  responsibility  reviews  rhetoric  scepticism  scientific_method  self  Seneca  Skinner  slavery  Socinians  Soros  soul  SSRN  status  Stoicism  Strauss  Taylor_Charles  theodicy  theology  uncertainty  values  virtue  virtue_ethics 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: