dunnettreader + article + exclusion   2

Georges Gloukoviezoff - Les banques face à leurs clients: Salariés de banque et inclusion bancaire | La Vie des idées - 28 janvier 2013
English translation March 2014 -- http://www.booksandideas.net/When-French-Banks-Encounter-their.html -- Most banks have now abandoned their previous function of providing advice. Instead, they view their services as products designed to maximize profits. They have started invoking the client’s autonomy as a way of passing on the risk of financial exclusion to their customers. In what ways have bank employees reacted to these new circumstances? -- Georges Gloukoviezoff est docteur en économie et spécialiste des questions d’inclusion financière des particuliers. Il est membre de l’Observatoire national de la pauvreté et de l’exclusion sociale. Il a publié en octobre 2010 aux Presses Universitaires de France "L’Exclusion bancaire. Le Lien social à l’épreuve de la rentabilité". Il tient également un blog sur la page d’Alternatives Economiques. -- downloaded French version as pdf to Note
article  France  financial_system  banking  access_to_finance  access_to_services  labor  labor-service_sector  consumer_protection  risk_management  risk_shifting  knowledge_economy  knowledge_workers  financial_innovation  advisory_services  business_practices  business-norms  profit  profit_maximization  financial_regulation  customer_relations  exclusion  exclusion-economic  economic_sociology  poverty  workforce  know-how  services  services-worker_autonomy  managerialism  productivity  incentives-distortions  consumer-know-how  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Oona A. Hathaway, Scott J. Shapiro - Outcasting: Enforcement in Domestic and International Law :: SSRN - Yale Law Journal, Vol. 121, No. 2, p. 252, 2011
Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 240 -- This Article offers a new way to understand the enforcement of domestic and international law that we call “outcasting.” Unlike the distinctive method that modern states use to enforce their law, outcasting is nonviolent: it does not rely on bureaucratic organizations, such as police or militia, that employ physical force to maintain order. Instead, outcasting involves denying the disobedient the benefits of social cooperation and membership. Law enforcement through outcasting in domestic law can be found throughout history - from medieval Iceland and classic canon law to modern-day public law. And it is ubiquitous in modern international law, from the World Trade Organization to the Universal Postal Union to the Montreal Protocol. Across radically different subject areas, international legal institutions use others (usually states) to enforce their rules and typically deploy outcasting rather than physical force. Seeing outcasting as a form of law enforcement not only helps us recognize that the traditional critique of international law - that it is not enforced and is therefore both ineffective and not real law - is based on a limited and inaccurate understanding of law enforcement. It also allows us to understand more fully when and how international law matters. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 98 -- Keywords: international law, treaties, World Trade Organization, Enforcement, jurisprudence
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  international_system  international_law  international_organizations  treaties  enforcement  exclusion  excommunication  cooperation  punishment  sanctions  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: